House of Commons Hansard #88 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was financial.

Topics

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Christine Moore Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, I find it interesting that the minister says I am not concerned about the Canadian Forces when he knows full well that I served in the Canadian Forces for three years. If anyone is concerned about the Canadian Forces, it is me.

The Conservatives are in Washington today to attend an emergency meeting on the problems and delays in the F-35 program. The Conservatives have to provide clear answers now.

How many F-35s is Canada buying? How much will those planes cost? When will they be available and operational?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, it is again a rhetorical rant from the no defence party opposite that we have heard time and time again. Those members have no plan B. Their plan B is not to buy equipment for the Canadian Forces.

Our associate minister is showing leadership on the Canadian file. He is meeting with our partners in the joint strike fighter program. They are working together.

Having served in the Canadian Forces, she should support those men and women who need this equipment. She should support the Canadian aerospace industry that will get huge advantages, in the millions of dollars, from the joint strike fighter program.

The Economy
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Ted Opitz Etobicoke Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the global economy remains uncertain, but Canada has been doing the right things.

While the NDP would ruin Canada with reckless and endless deficit spending, we are focused on jobs and economic growth with the right economic policies, and it is working. Over 610,000 new jobs were created since July 2009, the strongest job record in the G7.

Today, the latest evaluation of Canada's economy came with our GDP numbers. Would the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance please share details on Canada's performance?

The Economy
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Saint Boniface
Manitoba

Conservative

Shelly Glover Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, as everyone knows, we are focused on what matters to Canadian families, and that is creating a healthy economy and helping to create jobs on which families really depend.

We have taken the right and prudent steps to do that and we are getting results. Statistics Canada has announced that our economy grew 1.8% in the fourth quarter, among the strongest in the G7, and we are proud of that.

The economic action plan 2012 will keep on supporting jobs and growth and fight the NDP's job-killing agenda.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Jasbir Sandhu Surrey North, BC

Mr. Speaker, today we learned that the minister had given CSIS the go ahead to provide information to foreign intelligence agencies, even when doing so includes “substantial risk it will lead to torture”. The message the government is sending is that while Canada does not employ torture, it is okay to help others to do so.

This is a matter of right and wrong. Is it the minister's position that Canada now treats torture as a necessary evil?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Portage—Lisgar
Manitoba

Conservative

Candice Bergen Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, the member opposite is completely wrong. Our government does not condone and certainly does not engage in torture. The directives are very clear: CSIS will only share information in accordance with Canada's legal obligations.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Sylvain Chicoine Châteauguay—Saint-Constant, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government is running out of excuses to try to save face. The Conservatives seem to forget that international law is unambiguous. Torture is illegal, period.

What the Conservatives are proposing is tantamount to giving the green light to all the regimes that want to use torture, with information sent from this government to boot. Canadians expect their government to oppose torture unconditionally.

When will the minister reverse his decision and cancel this directive?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Portage—Lisgar
Manitoba

Conservative

Candice Bergen Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, the member opposite is being very misleading. We have very clear directives. We expect CSIS to comply and it does comply with those directives. There are Canadian laws that have to be upheld. We do not condone torture.

In all of our decisions regarding the safety of Canadians, that is our number one priority. Those directives are in line with that.

Government Priorities
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Laurin Liu Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the estimates provided this week indicate that the government will slash the budget of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency by 43%, even though the agency asked for more resources to better evaluate new oil sands projects.

The Conservatives say that there is no money and that cuts have to be made. However, they are spending millions of dollars on lobbying that will sabotage the environmental efforts of other countries.

Why are the profits of big oil companies being put ahead of the best interests of Canadians?

Government Priorities
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the premise of the question is false.

Either the member does not understand or cannot read the main estimates, or is being somewhat disingenuous in her question.

The differences in funding in the estimates are a result of programs that are sunsetting, in other words, coming to a predetermined end. Some of these programs will be renewed, of course. Others will be reshaped to better serve Canadians in the future.

The government is committed to environmental protection and to protecting jobs and the economy.

Government Priorities
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Laurin Liu Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister can rehearse his talking points all he wants, but the proof is in the pudding. The Conservatives have not been able to regulate the oil sands and that is why Americans have rejected Canadian oil.

At the end of the day, it is the Canadian economy that suffers. By placing all our bets on the oil sands, this has resulted in job losses in the manufacturing sector, jobs that are well-paying and family supporting.

Instead of cutting in the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, when will the government listen to our economic partners and when will the government put into place a sustainable plan for the development of our natural resources?

Government Priorities
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, again, my hon. colleague does not seem to understand the estimates. I would invite her to come to the environment committee on the 13th of this month when I will be available to explain all of the detail.

National Defence
Oral Questions

March 2nd, 2012 / 11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of National Defence. What will it be? Will he tell the brave men and women of the Canadian air force that they are going to get less than the 65 jet fighters that he promised them, or is he going to tell the brave men and women of our country, known as the Canadian taxpayers, that he is going to spend way more than the $9 billion that he promised them this project would cost?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I would tell the brave men and women of the Royal Canadian Air Force that we will invest in the proper equipment, the equipment that they in fact want, which is the joint strike fighter program.

This is a program the member opposite should be aware of because it actually started under the previous government. This program is moving forward with huge benefits for the Canadian aerospace industry. However, most important, we will have the right aircraft for the 21st century for those brave men and women so they can achieve mission success and come home safely to their families.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Scott Andrews Avalon, NL

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans refused to give a straight answer on the question of whether his government was changing DFO's fleet separation and owner-operator policies. If the minister goes ahead with these changes to this long-standing policy, it will mean the end of the inshore fishery in Newfoundland and Labrador and across all of Atlantic Canada. Large processing companies and corporations will take over the fishery and traditional independent fish harvesters will be a thing of the past.

Will the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries give us a straight answer? Is the government going to change the owner-operator policy and fleet separation policy, yes or no?