House of Commons Hansard #111 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was seniors.

Topics

Terry Fox Mile 0 Site
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Ed Holder London West, ON

Mr. Speaker, it was April 12, 1980 when Terry Fox dipped his artificial foot in the Atlantic Ocean off St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, to begin his journey across Canada to aid cancer research.

His Marathon of Hope, a 5,400 kilometre run on one leg, meant running a marathon every day for 143 days, perhaps the most outstanding feat of athleticism displayed by anyone ever.

Two weeks ago on the 32nd anniversary of the Marathon of Hope, I was in St. John's with the Minister of the Environment, responsible for Parks Canada, and Terry's family. Together we officially opened the Terry Fox Mile 0 site, featuring a bronze statue of Terry with a stunning view of St. John's harbour.

Terry Fox is a personal hero of mine and an inspiration to millions of people all around the world. He was an ordinary young man who showed extraordinary courage and determination. The Terry Fox Mile 0 site is a fitting tribute and a place where one can come to reflect and be inspired by this great Canadian.

I invite all Canadians to go to St. John's to see this magnificent tribute and read the inscription on the nearby cairn which states, “This is the place where a young man's dream began and a nation's hope lives on”.

Wheelchair Athlete
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Larry Miller Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to stand in the House today to recognize Josh Cassidy, who hails from Burgoyne in my riding of Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound.

Josh is on the Hill today for the Rolling Rampage event. He recently raced in the men's wheelchair division of the 116th Boston Marathon, winning and also setting a new world record.

Shortly after he was born, Josh was diagnosed with neuroblastoma, a cancer of the spine and abdomen, which resulted in the amputation of both of his legs.

Josh has been committed to working hard and has overcome many obstacles. Because of this, he beat the world record in the wheelchair division of the Boston Marathon by two seconds. He finished an astounding 3.14 minutes ahead of the second place contestant. Josh has firmly established himself as the frontrunner for the London Summer Olympic Games.

Josh is a shining example of what hard work can do if one puts one's mind to it. I congratulate him and wish him all the best in his future races. Constituents in Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound and indeed all Canadians are proud of Josh's accomplishments.

Workplace Safety
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Wayne Marston Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, ON

Mr. Speaker, if people were to travel to our community of Hamilton, Ontario and go to the corner of Main and Bay Streets, they would see a very stark monument.

It was made from a sheet of steel and has on it a visibly injured worker clinging by his fingers. This is a monument to workers injured or killed on the job or those suffering from occupational disease. It was erected on April 28, 1990.

The purpose of the monument's casting was not only to commemorate the loss of workers' lives but to remind us all of the risks taken by workers each and every day when they go to work.

Every day workers go to work expecting to return home to their families, but all too often they do not. In this modern age rush for productivity, mistakes are made and workers trying to meet the new realities of the modern workplace often pay the ultimate price.

April 28 is not just a day for workers to stop and remember those who are dead, but also for all of us to recommit to fight for safer workplaces for all Canadians.

Israel
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Mark Adler York Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, today we celebrate the 64th anniversary of the State of Israel.

Yom Ha'atzmaut, as it is called in Hebrew, marks the day in 1948 when modern day Israel was born out of the ashes of the Holocaust. Israel remains to this day the first and only pluralistic democratic nation in the Middle East.

Israel is one of Canada's greatest friends. We have a free trade agreement, knowledge exchange, and collaboration in science, technology and innovation. More importantly, we share the values of freedom, human rights, democracy and the rule of law.

While other nations deny Israel's very existence and the right of the Jewish people to a homeland, our Prime Minister has said:

Israel can rest assured that we will uphold its right to exist as an independent Jewish state as we continue in our efforts to promote peace and security in the region.

I would ask all members to stand with me in recognition and celebration of Israel's 64th independence day.

Chag Ha'atzmaut Sameach.

National Day of Mourning
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Nycole Turmel Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, on April 28, Canadians will mark our National Day of Mourning to honour all workers killed or injured at work.

This initiative was led by the Canadian Labour Congress and was officially recognized by our institutions with the passing of the Workers Mourning Day Act, which had been introduced by the former NDP member for Churchill, Rod Murphy.

This is an opportunity for us New Democrats, and for all members of this House, to show solidarity with victims, as well as their families, friends and colleagues. Every day, three working Canadians lose their lives on the job. This reminds us of the importance of creating safe and healthy workplaces.

More importantly, this reminds us of something that is crucial: we must never compromise when it comes to the health and safety of our workers—never.

Jan Karski
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Wladyslaw Lizon Mississauga East—Cooksville, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to a true hero, Jan Karski.

In 1939, Karski joined the Polish Home Army as a liaison officer. During the war and at great risk to his own life, Karski was smuggled, in disguise, into a Nazi German concentration camp in eastern Poland where he saw with his own eyes mass extermination taking place.

Scarred by what he had seen, Karski delivered an impassioned plea on behalf of Poland's Jews to the top allied officials in November 1942 and to President Roosevelt himself in July 1943. Unfortunately, his pleas went unanswered.

At a time when so many were silent, Karski, a righteous among the nations, spoke out. And so it is fitting that this year he will posthumously be awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in the United States.

Lakeland Mills Sawmill
Statements By Members

April 26th, 2012 / 2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Bob Zimmer Prince George—Peace River, BC

Mr. Speaker, on April 28 we mark the National Day of Mourning, the day we remember those killed or injured while in the workplace.

Our thoughts and prayers will continue to be with those affected by Monday night's explosion and fire at the Lakeland Mills sawmill in Prince George in northeastern B.C.

We were all deeply saddened by the news of the workers who passed away due to their injuries, Alan Little and Glenn Francis Roche, and also those who continue to fight for their lives. These are people who went to work to provide for their families and to make our province and country a better place in which to live.

We are known in northern B.C. for our strength and resiliency, and after this devastating event, we will need to rely on these traits now more than ever. During this difficult time, I have seen our community come together and draw upon this strength, determined to support one another as we grieve this terrible loss.

I ask all members to join me in offering our condolences to the workers and their families who have been sadly affected by this tragedy.

Workplace Safety
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, every day men and women in Canada risk their lives for their livelihood. In supporting themselves and their families, at least three people are killed on a daily basis with thousands more injured in the workplace annually. More often than not, these tragedies could have been prevented.

We must be vigilant in ensuring Canadians and foreign workers in Canada have access to the training and equipment they need to be safe on the job. Our workplaces above all else must be environments that foster safety for their workers, no matter the industry.

On behalf of the Liberal Party of Canada and our parliamentary caucus, I extend my deepest sympathies to the friends, families and colleagues who honour the loss of a loved one on this day, and I wish a quick recovery to all those who have been injured on the job.

Workplace Safety
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, the National Day of Mourning is a day to commemorate those injured and killed in the workplace.

Canadians know that far too many accidents on job sites are not accidents at all, but are entirely preventable.

Just in the past year, B.C. has witnessed tragedy at two separate sawmills. There was one in January in Burns Lake, which killed two and injured 19. Just this past week in Prince George in disturbingly similar circumstances, two more workers were killed and 22 were injured.

Don Dahr, my father-in-law, lost his father in the workplace when he was very young. He has dedicated much of his life to protecting workers in the workplace. He has often said that the rules and regulations that protect Canadians at work are written in blood.

When workers leave their homes and families to go to work, we must commit to them that we will do everything in our power to make sure that they return home safe at the end of the day.

National Day of Mourning
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Brad Butt Mississauga—Streetsville, ON

Mr. Speaker, the National Day of Mourning is marked every year on April 28. The Government of Canada officially recognized this in 1991 to commemorate those workers whose lives have been lost or who have been injured in the workplace. The National Day of Mourning has since spread to about 80 countries around the world.

This Saturday we will remember those who have lost their lives or have been injured in the workplace. These people are hard-working Canadians who went to work, provided for their families, and worked to make Canada a better place in which to live.

Even one workplace death or injury is too many for the family that is affected, which includes families of members of the House who have been personally affected by a workplace death.

The annual observance of the day hopefully will serve to strengthen the resolve of all of us to continue to establish safe conditions in the workplace.

My colleagues and I remember those who have lost their lives. We reaffirm our collective commitment to ensure that all Canadians can return home safe and sound at the end of the day.

National Day of Mourning
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Following discussions among representatives of all parties in the House, I understand that there is agreement to observe a moment of silence to commemorate the National Day of Mourning and to honour the memory of workers killed or injured at work.

I invite hon. members to rise.

[A moment of silence observed]

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Prime Minister left the door wide open to extending Canada's military mission in Afghanistan beyond 2014. He spouted rhetoric and stated that the government had not received this specific request, despite the fact that reliable military sources have told the media that a request was in fact received from the United States.

Is the Prime Minister saying that the United States has not made any contact whatsoever with Canada regarding the possible extension of the mission in Afghanistan?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I said that I have had no such contact.

I also said that our priorities remain the same, namely, to ensure that Afghanistan is safe so that it does not become a threat to our security and to ensure that Afghans themselves assume greater responsibility for their own security.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Prime Minister stated, “all of the military missions committed to under this government have come before the House”. However, that is not the case, and he knows it.

The last extension in Afghanistan was authorized by the Prime Minister acting alone. In November 2010, he said to Jack Layton:

The government has never submitted missions that do not involve combat to the House of Commons. This is a training and technical assistance mission and that is why we are acting on executive authority.

Is the Prime Minister going to act unilaterally once again to keep our troops in Afghanistan beyond 2014?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, once again, as I said, the government has every intention of bringing military missions to the House of Commons. In this case, this is a training mission. It is important that we ensure that Afghanistan is safe and is not a threat to global security. It is important also that the Afghans are responsible for their own security. That is why we are there, to prepare them to assume the full responsibility for their own security.