House of Commons Hansard #210 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was housing.

Topics

Democratic Reform
Statements by Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, another day, another Conservative under investigation. Senator Pamela Wallin is now under investigation for her expenses. She is alleged to have spent hundreds of thousands of taxpayer dollars on flights to Toronto. University of Regina constitutional expert Howard Leeson is calling on the Senate to remove Senator Wallin for failure to comply with constitutional residency requires.

All the while, Conservatives claim senators are “hard-working parliamentarians”. The average senator worked only 56 days last year. That is 309 days off a year. This is the ultimate Conservative gravy train.

The New Democrats have always rejected Senate appointments. We demand that party operatives stop doing partisan work on the public purse. We demand they pack up their fundraising operations and go home, back to Kanata. When the last of these unaccountable Conservative political operatives go out the door, they can turn out the lights on their way out the door.

New Democratic Party of Canada
Statements by Members

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Robert Goguen Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, NB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the leader of the NDP asked our government members to make youth job creation a key part of the upcoming budget. I can tell the leader of the NDP and his party that on this side of the House, our priority is jobs, growth and economic prosperity. That is why we have stood firmly opposed to the NDP leader's $20 billion job-killing tax that would kill jobs and stall economic growth. In fact, the NDP leader's $20 billion job-killing carbon tax would raise the price of everything including gas, groceries and electricity. The NDP's 2011 election platform planned to raise over $20 billion from its carbon tax scheme. The NDP leader said that this “will produce billions”.

While the NDP leader is working on a plan to raise billions of dollars of revenue from Canadians with his job-killing carbon tax, our government will remain focused on what matters to Canadians: jobs, growth and long-term prosperity.

Ethics
Oral Questions

February 13th, 2013 / 2:20 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, in the Senate, the more things change, the more they stay the same. Senator Pamela Wallin claimed more than $300,000 in travel expenses in the past three years alone. Less than 10% of these expenses were for travel in Saskatchewan, the province she is supposed to represent. Senator Wallin is using taxpayers' money to travel around the country and to star in the Conservative Party's fundraising activities.

Does the Prime Minister believe it is acceptable for taxpayers' money to be used to raise money for his political party?

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I reject that characterization.

In terms of Senator Wallin, I have looked at the numbers. Her travel costs are comparable to any parliamentarian travelling from that particular area of the country over that period of time. For instance, last year Senator Wallin spent almost half of her time in the province she represents in the Senate. The costs are to travel to and from that province, as any similar parliamentarian would do.

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, when Pamela Wallin was appointed to the Senate, it was well-known that she had not lived in Saskatchewan in decades. When Mike Duffy was appointed to the Senate, it was well-known that he had not lived on Prince Edward Island in decades. When Patrick Brazeau was appointed to the Senate, it was well-known that he had serious personal and ethical issues.

These are the Prime Minister's appointments. When will the Prime Minister take responsibility for his senators?

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the leader of the opposition is mixing different cases.

In the case of Senator Brazeau, I would point out that not long before I named Senator Brazeau, at the request of the NDP, he spoke on the floor of the House of Commons. He was a respected leader of a national aboriginal organization. Some things have happened more recently that are before the courts, and the Senate has taken the appropriate action under the circumstances.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Human Rights Watch report released today reveals that aboriginal women absolutely do not trust law enforcement officials. This has even been a major obstacle in investigations into the murders of aboriginal women in Canada. The authors of this report also allege that aboriginal women were assaulted and sexually abused by some police officers.

Will the Prime Minister finally agree to launch a full public inquiry into the disappearances and murders of aboriginal women in Canada?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I am very aware of the fact that a report was released today. The Minister of Public Safety has asked the Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP to look into the serious allegations made in the report. We do not have any information about these allegations, but anyone who does should give the information to the appropriate authorities.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Niki Ashton Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, the only way to bring justice to these murdered women is to call a public inquiry. The Human Rights Watch report sheds light on the failure of the police and successive governments to protect aboriginal women and girls against violence.

Civil society, aboriginal representatives and the NDP are all calling for a national public inquiry into the murders and disappearances of aboriginal women.

How many more victims will there be before the Conservatives take action?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, the government has asked the independent commission for public complaints against the RCMP to follow up on some allegations that have been made. There is no question that the deaths of these women are a tragedy that has caused deep pain for many families. Our thoughts and prayers remain with the victims and their families.

We will continue to move forward with a vigorous criminal justice agenda to address the concerns of victims. We call upon the NDP to help us in that respect.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Niki Ashton Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, the NDP stands with aboriginal leaders and civil society in calling on the government to hold a national public inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women in Canada. Provinces like B.C. are left to investigate police misconduct with a very limited mandate.

The government and police have failed aboriginal women. Will the minister agree to a national public inquiry to ensure a proper independent investigation, including into any possible police misconduct against aboriginal women in Canada?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, as I have indicated, I have asked the Commissioner for Public Complaints Against the RCMP to follow up on some allegations that have been made. In fact, I would encourage anyone with information that bears on these matters to pass it along to the appropriate authorities.

This is precisely why we have introduced legislation to deal with some issues inside the RCMP, and it is shocking to see that the NDP continues to stall these measures.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the allegation of sexual assault is not a complaint; the allegation of sexual assault has to do with a criminal act. Ordinarily, when there is an allegation, it is another police force that carries out the investigation with respect to an independent consideration of the question.

I wonder if the Prime Minister does not recognize that what is taking place is not a complaint about police behaviour. We have today, apparently, specific allegations of a criminal nature, and would he not agree that there has to be an independent police investigation with—

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The Right Hon. Prime Minister.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, obviously, if the hon. member has information relating to a crime, that information should be reported to the appropriate police authorities. If the allegation is on top of that, that the appropriate police authorities are aware and are not investigating, we forward that information to the RCMP complaints commission, as we have done.

However, the responsibility of every member of the House is not simply to throw around allegations. If such allegations and evidence for them exist, I encourage the hon. member to give them to the appropriate authorities so the allegations can be investigated.