House of Commons Hansard #212 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was citizenship.

Topics

Airline Industry
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we support a competitive system that serves the interests of passengers. We support a system that gives passengers a choice of airlines so they get better service and a good price at the same time.

The NDP is proposing a horrible regulation that will increase costs for passengers and workers in the industry.

I would add that the cost of fuel is also significant in this industry. Therefore, a carbon tax will also hurt passengers.

Labour
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Don Davies Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, workers at the St. John's airport have been on strike for almost six months. They just won their case at the labour board, proving they are bargaining in good faith. Now they want their employer back at the bargaining table.

With the Minister of Labour attending a management luncheon in St. John's today, will she interfere in yet another labour dispute by crossing a picket line at the St. John's airport or will she do the responsible thing and respect this legal strike at this critical time?

Labour
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Simcoe—Grey
Ontario

Conservative

Kellie Leitch Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and to the Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, both I and the minister have been disappointed that we have not found an opportunity for these two parties to come together. The minister continues to monitor the circumstances and the federal mediator remains involved in assisting both parties in coming to a reasonable solution. We encourage both parties to work together to come to an accommodation in the best interests of Canadians and the Canadian economy.

Financial Institutions
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Harold Albrecht Kitchener—Conestoga, ON

Mr. Speaker, our government is committed to standing up for small businesses, especially in their dealings with credit card companies. That is why we introduced a code of conduct to ensure that small businesses and other merchants were treated fairly. The same goes for their customers.

While the NDP voted against the code, we have continued to work with small businesses and retailers to ensure their voices are heard.

Could the Minister of State for Finance tell the House how the code continues to respond to the needs of small businesses?

Financial Institutions
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Mr. Speaker, our government has released new guidelines to better protect small businesses from unfair trading practices when it comes to credit cards for merchant fees. We are committed to making this code flexible and responsive to the needs of small businesses.

Let me read a quote from the Canadian Federation of Independent Business as it applauds this move. It states, “Going forward this is going to be a huge change. The saving for businesses is going to be massive”.

However, shamefully, the New Democrats voted against the code. I am not sure what they were thinking when they were opposing small businessmen.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Sean Casey Charlottetown, PE

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Minister of National Defence strangely claimed that he stood up for veterans against their own lawyers. Was he standing up for veterans when more than five years ago he refused to even negotiate for them? Was he standing up for veterans when he argued all the way to the Supreme Court that they should not even have the right to bring their case forward? Was he standing up for veterans when he fought them in Federal Court to deny their pensions and failed?

When the minister said that he was standing up for veterans, did he really mean he was standing up to them?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Madawaska—Restigouche
New Brunswick

Conservative

Bernard Valcourt Associate Minister of National Defence and Minister of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency) (La Francophonie)

Mr. Speaker, the minister was clear yesterday. As soon as the court decision was rendered, our government took action.

In January the government announced an $887 million agreement had been reached with the veterans' counsel, which we can all agree is a tremendous assistance to the veterans and their families. The government believes that legal fees of $66 million or $13,000 an hour is grossly excessive. We would rather have the money go to the veterans and their families.

Telecommunications
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Charmaine Borg Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, although the Conservatives have decided to scrap their horrible Bill C-30 on Internet snooping, we wonder if they will manage to plant their controversial measures in another bill.

Bill C-12 contains hidden measures that would allow the government to obtain personal information without judicial oversight.

If the Conservatives are really serious about abandoning their Internet snooping bill, then why did they not withdraw Bill C-12 as well?

Telecommunications
Oral Questions

Noon

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, on the contrary, Bill C-12 will better protect the personal information of consumers.

We are trying to bolster consumer confidence in on-line shopping. Recommendations were made by the committee and we want to implement them quickly. If the NDP wants to vote immediately, we would be very pleased to move forward with this bill.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

Noon

Conservative

Scott Armstrong Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley, NS

Mr. Speaker, the rogue state of North Korea has continued its provocative actions. They are truly a threat to international peace and security. Now we have credible reports that over 200,000 North Koreans are being held in political prison camps. There is no freedom in North Korea.

Can the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs please inform us whether Canada will support an international investigation into human rights abuses in North Korea?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

Noon

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the situation in North Korea is appalling. Canada has raised concerns at the United Nations about the deplorable human rights situation in North Korea.

We have imposed sanctions and a controlled engagement policy. Some have called for a commission of inquiry. Canada will work with our allies to support any work that will shine light on the abusers in North Korea, and bring international pressure on this regime to give its citizens the rights they deserve.

Canada Post
Oral Questions

Noon

NDP

Denis Blanchette Louis-Hébert, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister of state responsible for postal services was quite the jokester yesterday with his email comment, but he did not deny the possibility that they might reduce mail delivery from five to three days a week. Not to mention all of the post offices that are being shut down.

If the rotating strikes by Canada Post employees, who were calling for protection of their pension and better wages, were going to ruin our economy, could the Conservatives explain what will happen to the economy if we permanently reduce postal services?

Canada Post
Oral Questions

Noon

Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia
Manitoba

Conservative

Steven Fletcher Minister of State (Transport)

Mr. Speaker, this government is committed to quality mail service for all Canadians, no matter where they live.

If that member and his party were serious about mail delivery, they would not have blocked our attempts to restore mail delivery in the spring of 2011. Rather than help us, they lined up with their big union bosses and delayed the mail delivery, which had an effect on the economy and actually accelerated clients using other methods, such as email.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

February 15th, 2013 / noon

Bloc

André Bellavance Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives keep bringing in their ideological measures and are undermining the employment insurance system.

Even though 50% of unemployed workers are not eligible for benefits, the Conservatives keep adding restrictions. For example, workers are forced to accept lower-paying jobs further away from home, there are quotas to cut $40,000 a month, pregnant women could end up disqualified, and now the work-sharing program is becoming stricter. These are the kinds of tricks the Conservatives are using to make unemployed workers pay off the deficit.

How can the minister claim day after day that workers will still benefit from employment insurance while she is in the process of dismantling the whole program?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

Noon

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, that is not true at all.

Here are the facts. We want to help people find jobs in their region and in their area of expertise. This will be better for workers, their families and their communities. If there is no position available in their region and in their area of expertise, employment insurance will be there, as always.