House of Commons Hansard #212 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was citizenship.

Topics

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the track record of the Prime Minister is clear. Where every opportunity has presented itself, he has appointed a senator elected by Canadians: Senator Brown, Senator Unger, and most recently Senator Black, from Alberta. In every case where that has happened we have taken action, and we have taken action with a real plan to reform the Senate to allow Canadians to have a say.

The NDP does not think Canadians are mature enough to have a say in who represents them in the Senate. That is why the NDP does not trust Canadians to do that. That is why NDP members have opposed Senate reform legislation every step of the way. It is time for them to get serious. If they want to see reform, they should support our legislation.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Cardigan, PE

Mr. Speaker, DFO's new rules on muzzling science and restricting the release of information have sent shock waves throughout the country. Now the Conservatives are trying to silence American scientists, as well, on the giant Arctic project in the north.

DFO's new publication procedures are an unprecedented measure of political control of information. This is unacceptable. When will the government learn that muzzling science and information is an absolute shameful action that will cause our country a lot of harm?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, Fisheries and Oceans is a science-based department. Our scientists give thousands of interviews a year and publish hundreds of papers, some of those in partnership with other non-DFO scientists.

We understand that regional officials of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans advised scientists to seek approval before allowing external partners to publish articles that may include government intellectual property. That was done without political direction or the knowledge of the minister.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Cardigan, PE

Mr. Speaker, for the scientists who are left at DFO after the government's fire sale, morale is at rock bottom. The department is in tatters, and stress and uncertainty are far too common. The timeline to implement the destructive Fisheries Act changes keeps getting pushed back because the staff is simply not equipped to deal with the government's agenda.

Will the government finally learn its lesson and reverse this destructive agenda?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, no, we will not, because the common sense changes we are making to the Fisheries Act allow us to focus on commercial, aboriginal and recreational fishers in a way that the previous government was not able to do, and we are continuing on that path.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Scott Simms Bonavista—Gander—Grand Falls—Windsor, NL

Mr. Speaker, that is not true. It is all about big business for this particular government.

Let us look at the turbot fishery. Last year, the turbot fishery was overfished by up to 60%. A major culprit, of course, was foreign overfishing. Now we have a situation where sources say that an agreement has been worked out between Ocean Choice International and a Japanese company, allowing it an international quota to be fished inside the 200-mile limit in 3K, which affects the smaller independent fishermen.

Why is the government favouring big business over the smaller independent fishermen in 3K?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, of course, none of that is true.

I would be happy to relay those comments to the minister. However, the member will know that the changes that Canada has made to NAFO, for example, have strengthened our ability to combat overfishing. We are continuing to work in that area and are pleased with the results we have seen.

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Questions

February 15th, 2013 / 11:40 a.m.

NDP

Randall Garrison Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, this week, at the ongoing inquest into the tragic death of Ashley Smith, correctional officers testified they were given orders from upper management not to intervene in Ashley's self-harm incidents because “there were too many use of force reports being filed”.

Since Corrections Canada ordered a policy change in July 2001, what has the Minister of Public Safety done to make sure necessary changes have been implemented so incidents like the death of Ashley Smith will never happen again?

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Portage—Lisgar
Manitoba

Conservative

Candice Bergen Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for the question. We are all very concerned and very saddened. We never want to see what happened to Ashley Smith happen again. We are in agreement with that. That is why our government has introduced changes.

Correctional Services Canada has led the way in many of the changes it has made. We have ensured faster mental health screening. We have created a mental health strategy for prisoners. We have extended psychological counselling and we have improved staff training.

Certainly there is more to do and we want to keep working on this together, but we have addressed the problem and we will continue to address this.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Rosane Doré Lefebvre Alfred-Pellan, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives intend to do nothing about tragedies like the case of Ashley Smith.

Major changes need to be made to the RCMP to address the issue of harassment and bullying. Yesterday, the report released by the RCMP public complaints commission confirmed the need for an independent and more transparent process in which members of both the RCMP and the public can have confidence.

Will the minister follow the zero tolerance recommendations of the commission in order to create a healthy working environment that is fair for everyone?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Portage—Lisgar
Manitoba

Conservative

Candice Bergen Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, that hon. member is incorrect. We are all very concerned with what happened to Ashley Smith. It is despicable that she would have just made that comment. We never want to see that happen again.

In regard to the report the member mentioned, the report came out yesterday from the Commission for Public Complaints, the independent commission. We appreciate that report. It is good to note that this report shows there are not systemic harassment issues within the RCMP, but any kind of harassment or bullying would never be tolerated and should not be tolerated within the RCMP.

That is why we call on the opposition to support Bill C-42, which brings greater accountability and a process whereby the RCMP can deal with these kinds of issues.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Robert Chisholm Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Mr. Speaker, on February 11, I asked the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans a question about silencing scientists. He told me, “there has been no change in DFO policy with regard to scientists”. Now we learn that managers at DFO in fact emailed scientists on January 29, warning them to keep their mouths shut unless they had approval from DFO. Muzzling scientists is wrong; so is trying to mislead the House.

I want to ask the minister to do the right thing, let scientists tell the truth to Canadians and apologize to the House.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, as I mentioned earlier, DFO is a science-based department and it engages in science, some of that in partnership with other non-DFO scientists.

What happened in that case is regional officials at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans advised scientists to seek approval before allowing external partners to publish articles that might include government intellectual property. This was done without the minister's knowledge.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Laurin Liu Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative efforts to muzzle scientists are so unacceptable that international scientists are now refusing to work with Canada.

American researchers, who have been working with us in the Arctic since 2003, are now required to agree to bizarre new policies prohibiting them from publishing their research without the minister's approval. They have rightly rejected this form of censorship.

When are the Conservatives going to stop hiding disturbing facts? When will they let the scientific discoveries speak for themselves?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, we are pleased with the fact that DFO is just one of our science-based departments that publishes hundreds of papers and gives thousands of interviews and lectures around the country.

In this case, as I have mentioned, when we partner with external scientists, then we need to ensure what the rules are with respect to the intellectual property that is the property of the crown.