National Strategy on Advertising to Children Act

An Act concerning the development of a national strategy respecting advertising to children and amending the Broadcasting Act (regulations)

Sponsor

Peter Julian  NDP

Introduced as a private member’s bill. (These don’t often become law.)

Status

Introduced, as of Oct. 5, 2016

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Summary

This is from the published bill. The Library of Parliament often publishes better independent summaries.

This enactment provides for the development and implementation of a national strategy on advertising to children and amends the Broadcasting Act in order to clarify the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission’s regulatory power under paragraph 10(1)‍(d) of that Act.

Elsewhere

All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

National Strategy on Advertising to Children ActRoutine Proceedings

October 5th, 2016 / 3:15 p.m.
See context

NDP

Peter Julian NDP New Westminster—Burnaby, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-313, An Act concerning the development of a national strategy respecting advertising to children and amending the Broadcasting Act (regulations).

Mr. Speaker, many other countries have banned advertising that targets children, but in Canada, Quebec is the only province that, in 1981, passed legislation banning advertising to children and the results have been good. That is the purpose of my bill.

The average Canadian child is exposed to over 20,000 ads a year, and 90% of the food that is marketed to children and youth is unhealthy. Our children are our future. That is why I have developed the bill, working with the Centre for Health Science and Law. The bill is ready to go. The government should just support it because we have done the work for the government.

I hope all members will support this important action to protect our children.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)