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House of Commons Hansard #28 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was children.

Topics

Nuclear ReactorsOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Natural Resources and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, as I have already said, if and when AECL is successful in its bid and if and when it is successful in negotiating a contract subsequent to that bid, it will of course comply with all applicable Canadian standards and all applicable Turkish laws. Environmental specifications were a part of the bidding process imposed by Turkey.

In addition to that, AECL, as a matter of policy, has an environmental examination process that is built into every one of its projects.

The SenateOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Bill Gilmour Reform Nanaimo—Alberni, BC

Mr. Speaker, Albertans mourn the untimely death of Senator Walter Twinn. I know that members from both sides of the House conveyed their condolences at his funeral. Since then both Ralph Klein and Alberta Liberal leader Grant Mitchell have called on the Prime Minister to let Albertans elect their next senator.

May I remind the Prime Minister that he said in 1990 “I pledge to work for a Senate that is elected”. Will the Prime Minister keep his word and allow Albertans to elect their next senator?

The SenateOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Saint-Maurice Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, we were for an elected Senate. It was a proposition in the Charlottetown accord that the Reform Party campaigned against.

Reformers want to have it both ways. They did not want to make any compromises and they voted down an elected Senate. I will name the next senator the same way as the father of the Leader of the Opposition was named.

The SenateOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Bill Gilmour Reform Nanaimo—Alberni, BC

Mr. Speaker, this does not require constitutional change. May I remind the Prime Minister that in Alberta the precedent has already been set. The late Stan Waters was elected as senator to the Senate in 1989. Now we have members of all sides of the Alberta legislature, including provincial Liberals, asking for an elected senator.

I ask again. Will the Prime Minister let Albertans elect their next senator?

The SenateOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Saint-Maurice Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister of the land is obliged to respect the Constitution for Alberta and the provinces of Canada.

Search And Rescue HelicoptersOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Jocelyne Girard-Bujold Bloc Jonquière, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Public Works and Government Services.

The government will soon announce its decision regarding the purchase of 15 search and rescue helicopters, without having even debated the issue in Parliament.

Will the government do what it usually does when a difficult decision must be made and announce its choice of helicopters on Friday afternoon or next week, when Parliament will not be sitting?

Search And Rescue HelicoptersOral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel Québec

Liberal

Alfonso Gagliano LiberalMinister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, the process for the purchase of 15 helicopters has been unfolding for a long time. We had four bidders whose names made the news.

We are currently studying the bids and once this review is completed, I will make recommendations to cabinet and a decision will be announced.

Youth EmploymentOral Question Period

November 5th, 1997 / 2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Sophia Leung Liberal Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Secretary of State for Western Economic Diversification.

Canadians know the importance of job creation for young Canadians and its impact on the future of the nation. Young people from Vancouver Kingsway want to know how western economic diversification has addressed the creation of jobs for youth in western Canada.

Youth EmploymentOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Saint Boniface Manitoba

Liberal

Ronald J. Duhamel LiberalSecretary of State (Science

Mr. Speaker, western diversification has made great progress specifically targeted to young people.

The first area is in science and technology where it has created almost 100 jobs. It hires young people to help small business—

Youth EmploymentOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh. Oh.

Youth EmploymentOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Ronald J. Duhamel Liberal Saint Boniface, MB

Mr. Speaker, they are not interested in jobs.

It hires young people to help small business in science and technology.

Second is the international trade personnel program which has enhanced exports and has created approximately 400 jobs.

Third is the western youth entrepreneurial program that encourages young people to get involved and start out in small business. It has created almost 500 jobs.

FisheriesOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Reform

Gary Lunn Reform Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, Spanish overfishing off the east coast prompted this government to respond with guns and Captain Canada. Meanwhile on the west coast, Americans continue to overfish and continue to violate the Pacific salmon treaty and this government does nothing.

My question is for the Prime Minister. Why the double standard for British Columbians?

FisheriesOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Victoria B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson LiberalMinister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member comes from Vancouver Island, British Columbia and he should know better than to ask such a foolish question.

The fact is that the salmon resources on the west coast are shared between Canada and the United States. To have a decision which will be lasting and in the best interests of fishermen of both countries and at the same time to protect conservation, it is essential to have a joint agreement with the Americans. There is no other way of handling this matter except through an agreement which both sides feel is in their interests.

FisheriesOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Reform

Gary Lunn Reform Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, I am from British Columbia, just like the minister of fisheries. I am representing the people of British Columbia and they are insulted to be called foolish.

The people of British Columbia have heard talk for five years from this government and they are sick and tired of it. They want action. When is this minister going to get up off his seat and do something for the people of British Columbia?

FisheriesOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Victoria B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson LiberalMinister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, at the end of the day what counts is not the rhetoric in the House. What counts is an agreement with the Americans. We must have a lasting agreement that we have not had because of the flaws in the Mulroney treaty which was negotiated in 1985.

We are attempting to overturn that through the Strangway-Ruckelshaus process. The hon. member is well aware of that process. Instead of coming here and putting forth the comments he has, he should be supporting the process so we can get to an agreement which will solve the problem we face on the west coast.

FisheriesOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson NDP Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the fisheries committee heard eloquent evidence from B.C. coastal communities and aboriginal people about the devastating socioeconomic impact of the Mifflin plan.

I want to ask a question of the Minister of Human Resources Development. The Community Fisheries Development Centre has prepared an excellent active labour market transition plan costing $375 million over three years. On the east coast fishery so far, $3.4 billion was spent. I want to ask the minister to finally meet with representatives from British Columbia who are here today. Will he support their proposal and not give us more rhetoric? What will he finally—

FisheriesOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Minister of Human Resources Development.

FisheriesOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew LiberalMinister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, my colleague, the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans met with them yesterday. My parliamentary secretary, the member for Kenora—Rainy River, met with them today. My parliamentary secretary will be visiting them.

I think it would be irresponsible to pit one region against another and make comparisons. The situation in B.C. is serious but is on a different scale than the one we have in Atlantic Canada. I think the member will grant that. My department has already invested in a number of programs for the communities in British Columbia—

FisheriesOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Bras d'Or.

DevcoOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Michelle Dockrill NDP Bras D'Or, NS

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Natural Resources.

During a recent meeting with the auditor general, we were informed that a special examination of the crown corporation Devco will be concluding soon but only Devco's board of directors have the right to see the results of this audit.

Taking into account the latest questionable activity of Devco's management, and on behalf of the members from the United Mine Workers of America who are in Ottawa today, will the minister live up to the standards of openness and accountability that his party campaigned on and table—

DevcoOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Minister of Natural Resources.

DevcoOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Natural Resources and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I am sure the hon. member shares the sentiment expressed by the union, by the Government of Nova Scotia and by our government to have success stories related to Devco.

The special examination is part of the process to try to ensure that the corporation is operating in a correct and proper basis. The study is being conducted by the auditor general. When the report is prepared, it will be handled in the appropriate way according to law. I will take the hon. member's request under advisement.

EnvironmentOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

John Herron Progressive Conservative Fundy Royal, NB

Mr. Speaker, when referring to Canada's position on greenhouse gas emissions, the Prime Minister said last week in this House “Our position will, I hope, be acceptable to all Canadians”.

One month before Kyoto all they can do is cross their fingers and hope. Apparently it is a coin toss whether the Prime Minister impedes the progress of industry or negotiates away Canada's reputation as an environmental world leader.

Will the Prime Minister at least consult Canadians? Will he commit today to having any position derived from Kyoto subject to a vote in this House?

EnvironmentOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Northumberland Ontario

Liberal

Christine Stewart LiberalMinister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the government is committed to legally binding targets in Kyoto. We are dealing with every partner in this country in reaching our goals and timetables. We are open to any consideration and any suggestions from other parties in this House. We would like to encourage all Canadians to be involved in this very important agenda.

EnvironmentOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

John Herron Progressive Conservative Fundy Royal, NB

Mr. Speaker, my question was quite precise. I asked whether any positions derived from Kyoto would be subject to a vote in this House? That was the question I asked.

The Minister of the Environment has just stated that she has been in dialogue with her provincial counterparts. Next week on November 12 there is a meeting with the provincial energy ministers and provincial environment ministers and today they still do not know what the agenda for that meeting will be. When will they know the agenda? What will be discussed? More important, they will be asked to sign on to a position that they have no idea—