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House of Commons Hansard #132 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was money.

Topics

Canada Health Care, Early Childhood Development And Other Social Services Funding ActGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Joe Clark Progressive Conservative Kings—Hants, NS

Madam Chairman, the question is not whether the government believes that the provision reflects the agreement among the first ministers. The question is whether the amendment presented by the New Democratic Party is one that is consistent with the rules of parliament. It is on that question that I would like the hon. minister to consult the officials who are here on the floor of the House of Commons so that—

Canada Health Care, Early Childhood Development And Other Social Services Funding ActGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Don Boudria Liberal Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

It is in order.

Canada Health Care, Early Childhood Development And Other Social Services Funding ActGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Joe Clark Progressive Conservative Kings—Hants, NS

I am advised from his seat, by the minister, that this amendment is in order. That means it would—

Canada Health Care, Early Childhood Development And Other Social Services Funding ActGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

The Assistant Deputy Chairman

I am afraid I have to interrupt since it is 1.59 p.m.

(Bill reported, concurred in, read the third time and passed)

Canada Health Care, Early Childhood Development And Other Social Services Funding ActGovernment Orders

2 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Joe Clark Progressive Conservative Kings—Hants, NS

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order.

Canada Health Care, Early Childhood Development And Other Social Services Funding ActGovernment Orders

2 p.m.

The Speaker

It is two o'clock. We would usually proceed to statements by members and hear the point of order after question period. However, because this carried on, I will give the hon. member one minute, which means 60 seconds, to make his point.

Canada Health Care, Early Childhood Development And Other Social Services Funding ActGovernment Orders

2 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Joe Clark Progressive Conservative Kings—Hants, NS

An amendment was introduced at the plenary stage that was deemed to be in order. The Chair did not have the opportunity to call for a vote on that amendment. The report was made before a vote had been taken.

Consequently the process was not completed, and through no ill will. The House would certainly want to have the committee of the whole, in either committee of the whole forum or forum of the whole House, to be able to vote upon a motion properly put, accepted as being within the rules of parliament, and overlooked simply because of the fluctuation in time.

Canada Health Care, Early Childhood Development And Other Social Services Funding ActGovernment Orders

2 p.m.

The Speaker

I am handed a note that says there was agreement prior to this time that the bill shall be reported, concurred in at the report stage, and read the third time no later than 1.59 p.m. I find that was carried out. That is what we are going to do.

2000 Manifesto For PeaceStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Yvon Charbonneau Liberal Anjou—Rivière-Des-Prairies, QC

Mr. Speaker, last month, in the presence of the Speaker of the House of Commons and the Speaker of the Senate, I was privileged to hand over to the Director-General of UNESCO, His Excellency, Mr. Matsuura, the 2000 Manifesto Pledge, signed by nearly 300 Canadian parliamentarians from both Houses.

This initiative was carried out under the auspices of the Friendship Group of Parliamentarians for UNESCO and under the umbrella of the International Year for the Culture of Peace decreed by the UN.

May I remind you that the Manifesto 2000 for a culture of peace and non-violence is a commitment to respect the life and dignity of every human being, to practice active non-violence, to put an end to exclusion, to defend freedom and cultural diversity, to promote responsible consumer behaviour and sustainable development and to contribute to the democratic development of our communities with full participation by women.

Festival Of DiwaliStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Reform

Deepak Obhrai Reform Calgary East, AB

Mr. Speaker, on October 26 Hindus and Sikhs in Canada will light their homes to celebrate the festival of Diwali. They will also pray for peace, harmony and prosperity for all humanity.

Diwali celebrates the triumph of knowledge and light over ignorance and darkness. Canada's Hindus and Sikhs feel proud to share this celebration with fellow citizens of all religious backgrounds.

For my part I have had the honour in the past to celebrate Diwali with my colleagues on Parliament Hill. Due to an imminent election Diwali celebrations in Ottawa will be postponed. However I invite my colleagues to celebrate Diwali with all their constituents.

On behalf of the Leader of the Opposition and my colleagues in the House of Commons, I wish Canadians of Indian descent a happy Diwali and a prosperous New Year.

The Late Robert BealeStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Clifford Lincoln Liberal Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, it was with great sorrow that I learned yesterday of the passing of a friend, Robert Beale, a Canadian of unparalleled dynamism and generosity.

Thirty years ago, with the support of Jean Béliveau and others, Bob started sports cultural exchanges programs, under which hockey tournaments brought young people from all corners of Canada and their parents together to participate in the tournaments and created long-lasting bonds among them.

I have known few Canadians and few friends as big hearted as Bob Beale and none as committed to helping others. His programs of sports cultural exchanges have brought together over the last 30 years many thousands of young Canadians and their parents from all regions of the country. The programs have created lasting bonds.

Bob was a tireless and selfless individual deeply convinced, in his own words, that “adults through the history of many nations have learned the ways to overcome racism, prejudice and discrimination through the eyes and hearts of children”.

With great sorrow I mourn the passing of this special Canadian and extend to his wife, Alice, and his family all my friendship and sympathy.

Member For Edmonton SouthwestStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Ian McClelland Reform Edmonton Southwest, AB

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate being able to say a few words.

If what is likely to take place does take place, this will probably be the last opportunity I have to recognize and thank all the members here. I specifically want to thank all the francophones who have borne up so well under my French these last couple of years.

I also want to thank all the House officers, the staff on the Hill, my colleagues in the Alliance and colleagues across the aisle, north and south. Although we have been adversaries we have always been friends. I will take this place with me for the rest of my life and carry it fondly in my heart.

I especially want to thank those I love and who love me for their support over the years, my constituency association and particularly the voters of Edmonton Southwest who have entrusted me with this wonderful privilege over these last seven years.

Co-OperativesStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Jean Augustine Liberal Etobicoke—Lakeshore, ON

Mr. Speaker, I wish to recognize both National Co-op Week in Canada and International Credit Union Day and pay tribute to these unique and democratic organizations that improve daily the quality of life for Canadians.

There is no question that co-operatives lead by example. They provide a way to successfully meet the social and economic needs of Canadians. They also are an effective tool to help the government address priority issues.

As the world moves toward a global economy, co-operatives will be asked to play a greater role in our economy and society. By investing in Canadian communities, which is the theme of this year's co-op week, co-operatives can also play a new role, one that transcends social and economic objectives. They can be partners with government to ensure that citizens, no matter where they live, receive the benefits of Canadian prosperity.

I offer my congratulations and recognize Canadian International Credit Union Day and National Co-op Week.

Spirit Of Community AwardsStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Lou Sekora Liberal Port Moody—Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to recognize the fourth annual Spirit of Community Awards celebrated in my riding last week. Eleven of the top citizens in Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam were honoured for their community action and volunteer work. This event was presented by the Society for Community Development.

David Driscoll, a well-known former mayor of Port Moody, accepted the Lifetime of Leadership Award.

I congratulate all the recipients of the Spirit of Community Awards for their hard work, dedication and compassion for the community. It is greatly appreciated.

Co-OperativesStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Reform

Charlie Penson Reform Peace River, AB

Mr. Speaker, this week has been designated National Co-op Week and today is International Credit Union Day. Both are meant to raise awareness of the special role co-ops and credit unions play in our communities.

Co-operatives and credit unions have helped to shape our history by providing social and economic benefits to many Canadians over the years. I am confident they will continue to provide those benefits to individuals, families and businesses in the future.

I ask Canadians to join me today in recognizing the significant contributions co-ops have made and continue to make in our society. I want them to take part in the many celebrations planned throughout the country from now until October 21 in celebration of this important occasion.

Economic PolicyStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Paul Mercier Bloc Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, once upon a time there was a highway robber who lurked in the woods to relieve passersby of their gold. He accumulated ill-gotten gains of 1,000 gold coins in this way.

One day, he decided to give back 500 of these gold coins to his victims. Foolish fellow that he was, he thought he could buy back their friendship by doing so.

The robber's cronies were greatly impressed by this magnanimous gesture. They were indignant that the victims showed no gratitude and shouted at them “You could at least say thank you”.

No connection with this little fable, of course, but yesterday our Minister of Finance played Santa, yet he neglected to tell us that this money he is redistributing so magnanimously came from our own pockets, the pockets of the unemployed, the workers, the employers, the pensioners.

I hope, for our minister's sake, that he is not naïve enough to expect a thank-you from the voters, who will cast their votes in favour of the Liberals. Despite what he seems to think, people are not that dumb.

That was my last statement in the House, Mr. Speaker.

Brain Tumour Awareness MonthStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Eleni Bakopanos Liberal Ahuntsic, QC

Mr. Speaker, the month of October has been designated Brain Tumour Awareness Month in Canada.

Each year approximately 10,000 Canadians of all ages are diagnosed with brain tumours. More than 100 different types of brain tumours have been identified. Brain tumours are the second leading cause of cancer death in children under the age of 20 and the third leading cause of cancer death in young adults between the ages of 20 and 39.

The mission of the Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada is to collect funds for research, to provide support services to people with brain tumours and their families, and to provide information to the public.

I would like to quote for members the words written by a young woman, Krista, age 19, who understands better than any of us the devastation of cancer:

I look into the sky and what do I see? A castle, a rainbow, and dreams for me,

An end to this battle which I must fight, To rid my feelings of depression and fright.

An end to cancer is not far away, It will be here soon...Someday.

Let us hope and pray that the someday—

Brain Tumour Awareness MonthStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Timiskaming—Cochrane.

MiningStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Ben Serré Liberal Timiskaming—Cochrane, ON

Mr. Speaker, I wish to express my congratulations to the finance minister for his outstanding economic statement. The mining industry is thankful for the introduction of a federal tax credit for flow through share investors. It will stimulate the upfront financing of junior mining exploration projects all over northern Ontario and Canada.

Exploration spending will result in the discovery of new mines, which in turn will create jobs and result in billions of dollars in new investment and export revenues. The constituents of Timiskaming—Cochrane, the mining industry and I all believe natural resources will continue to be the building blocks of our economy in the 21st century. I thank the finance minister for his support.

Member For Vancouver QuadraStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Ted McWhinney Liberal Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, I will not be a candidate for a third parliamentary mandate in the forthcoming general election. When the Prime Minister invited me to become a candidate in 1992, I said I would limit myself to two terms at most. I see no reason to depart from that today.

In leaving the House, I am not entering on early retirement. I am resuming my work in other national and international arenas like the Institut de Droit International, of which I am the current president.

Thank you to the electors of Vancouver Quadra for their kind support and warm encouragement through two successive terms.

I want to thank MPs of all political parties for their friendship, co-operation and goodwill.

Home Support Workers WeekStatements By Members

October 19th, 2000 / 2:15 p.m.

NDP

Gordon Earle NDP Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, while the Canadian Alliance is ignoring the health concerns of Canadians while wining and dining and wooing votes from their rich corporate friends, and while the Liberal government did nothing in its economic statement to ensure a comprehensive health care system, the people in Nova Scotia recognize the need for an integrated and complete health care system.

Nova Scotia is celebrating Home Support Workers Week. Home support workers help thousands of Nova Scotians get the quality care services they need in the comfort of their own home and close to family and friends. Home support workers are an essential part of the fabric of health care in Canada.

As we look to reshape health care in Canada and to hopefully begin to undo the damage wrought by years of health care cuts administered by Liberal and Conservative governments, we need to ensure that home care is properly funded and that workers are properly paid and work in decent conditions. The financial support for those needing home care must be made available.

Home care workers offer experienced care, support, compassion and dignity to many people in our community. Thank you to all home care support workers for their ongoing efforts.

National Co-Op WeekStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Rick Borotsik Progressive Conservative Brandon—Souris, MB

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to National Co-op Week being held this week between October 15 and 21 and to recognize the important economic and social role co-operatives and credit unions play in many communities in Canada. Credit Union Day is being celebrated today, October 19. The theme for this year's celebration is “Co-operatives and credit unions—investing in Canadian Communities”.

I would particularly like to pay tribute to co-operatives in Manitoba such as Credit Union Central of Manitoba, Federal Co-Operatives Ltd. and Agricore.

Co-operatives play a major role in the Canadian economy, with over 150,000 people working in the industry. Co-ops and credit unions are an integral part of our economy, accounting for over $167 billion in assets.

Whether it is in agriculture, financial services, insurance or housing, co-operatives are growing, adapting and changing to help shape a better world for all of us.

Speaker Of The HouseStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

The Speaker

I realize that today there have been a few members I have not been able to recognize in standing orders. There are a few reasons for this.

I too wanted to take a minute. There is no single word in French to say goodbye. In French, we use expressions such as “À la prochaine, au revoir, adieu”. Today, it is my turn.

I will take just a few moments to say goodbye to you. I do not know if there will be an election but if there is, most of you will be standing again to come back to this beautiful place, this institution, the House of Commons of Canada.

If I may quote Laurier, he said that this was his home for 40 years. This was my home for 22. It is a home where I have enjoyed working with you and your predecessors. In 22 years it has been an adventure, surely with ups and downs, but for every down day that I have had there have been 100 up days.

You have paid me one of the greatest honours that any member of parliament could receive and that was to choose me on two different occasions to be your Speaker. It is an honour which very few of us could ever aspire to and one which I consider a great gift and a great privilege.

Over the last few days I have thought about how I would say the words in this place that I have spoken a number of times, like you, in my maiden speech and like you, on votes that were particularly interesting and important for me.

During the time I presided over the debates of the House of Commons, I sometimes had to make difficult decisions. I made them. It was my duty to do so.

I thank the people who voted for me over the years and sent me here six times. Once they decided they loved me so much that I should stay with them in the riding for four years. For those other six times I thought they were the most intelligent voters in Canada. Even when they kept me home, I thought, well, there was a reason for that too.

I wish you well, my colleagues, you who have served and you who will serve in the years ahead in this House of Commons.

May I gently remind you of who you are, of who we are. We are the representatives of the people of Canada. When they send us here, they expect from us the best that we have to give. Sometimes in the heat of battle we use words that in hindsight we would have preferred to leave unsaid, but we get through that one way or another.

I am told that there was a scratch on a stone after the battle of Thermopylae, a little saying. If I had anything to ask you to say about me, if indeed you ever do say anything, perhaps you would consider these words. My colleagues, go tell the Canadians that their Speaker, their servant, is leaving his post. His watch is over.

I am ready to pass all of this on, as it should be, from one Speaker to the next.

I hope that you will always cherish this place, as I have. No greater honour could I have received. I thank you for this honour you have given to me.

Speaker Of The HouseStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Speaker Of The HouseStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Saint-Maurice Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I think all members share the sadness I feel because you are about to leave your position as Speaker of the House.

You were among the first elected speakers of the House. You are probably the longest standing elected speaker. You have established a very important tradition.

As you know, Mr. Speaker, we have been colleagues in the House for all these years and I can tell you that you have been a wonderful colleague for me and for all those here. You have always been a very committed member of the House of Commons. You have represented your constituents with great honour and determination.

When you came to this job you honoured the House of Commons and the job. It was not easy. A few times I found that you were cutting me off a bit quickly, because the Leader of the Opposition can prepare his question but I cannot prepare my answer.

The spirit that prevails today, the fact that the Leader of the Opposition and myself and all the members of the House can smile and talk about recollections of you in the Chair and be in such a good mood, is a reflection of the quality of the job you have done.

As leader of your party, because all these times you were elected under the Liberal flag—there was one year that it was not flying properly and a lot of us had to do something for a few years until they decided to take us back here—I just want, on behalf of everyone, to say thank you for a job well done and to wish you the best of luck in future endeavours.

You will always have the affection of all the members of the House and you will always have the reputation of a man who has served his country very well, and particularly the House of Commons.

Good luck, Mr. Speaker.