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House of Commons Hansard #128 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was transportation.

Topics

Women's PovertyOral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Brant Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart LiberalMinister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, I no longer understand, because the member for Roberval said that this was good news for young seasonal workers in construction, who are making fairly good money. Certain clauses have also been relaxed for women. The premium rate has been lowered by 15 cents. This is good news and will help with a few of the problems.

So, if they agree, why ask these questions?

HealthOral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

David Price Liberal Compton—Stanstead, QC

Mr. Speaker, last night the Leader of the Opposition unveiled his party's right wing platform in Kitchener. The plan backtracks on a number of commitments that the leader of the party, formerly known as Reform, had committed himself to only a few short months ago.

Can the Minister of Health tell the House just what the Alliance platform will do to our Canadian health care system?

HealthOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Etobicoke Centre Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the most important part of what was said last night is what was left out. The reform alliance did not say that it would surrender federal power to enforce the Canada Health Act. It did not say that it would no longer transfer cash to the provinces. It would give it all away in tax points.

No federal cash means no federal role and no federal role means no national standards. No national standards means a ten tier health care system in Canada. The reform alliance would destroy Canadian medicare and we will not let it do that.

Species At RiskOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Reform

Rahim Jaffer Reform Edmonton Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, it is good to see the government worried for a change in light of real competition.

The species at risk act is the government's second attempt to implement a plan to protect species and habitat. Once again it has failed to bring all the necessary stakeholders together.

Why does the minister refuse to recognize that fair market value compensation is essential to guaranteeing the co-operation of all Canadians in habitat protection programs?

Species At RiskOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Kitchener Centre Ontario

Liberal

Karen Redman LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the government supports the principle of full cost accounting applications to decisions taken throughout the economy. We have already taken related action. Sustainable development is a key consideration for all government operations. We are working with all stakeholders to make sure that we protect not only species at risk but habitat also.

Species At RiskOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Reform

Rahim Jaffer Reform Edmonton Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, I wonder if the parliamentary secretary was reading from the right page.

First we learned that leaseholders, ranchers and farmers will not be compensated for financial loss that results from the act. Then the minister decided in committee that corporations will not qualify for compensation.

As Canadians are trying to put habitat protection and protection of species ahead, why does the minister refuse to guarantee fair market compensation for landowners and leaseholders who have economically crippling restrictions placed on their lands?

Species At RiskOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Kitchener Centre Ontario

Liberal

Karen Redman LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the government has put forward a very sound piece of legislation. We have asked for expert input on this very topic of compensation.

I would ask the members opposite why they are not co-operating to make sure that this important piece of legislation, important not only to the government but to Canadians, gets into committee in order that we may deal with it.

AgricultureOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Dick Proctor NDP Palliser, SK

Mr. Speaker, as all of us know, this weekend is a time when Canadians count their blessings and give thanks for a bountiful harvest and a full larder. However, once again few of our farm families who produce that bountiful harvest are celebrating because farm federal safety nets are simply too restrictive and too skimpy to allow them any meaningful return.

The Canadian Federation of Agriculture says that $2 billion would go a long way toward levelling the playing field with our major competitors.

My question is for the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food. With large and growing surpluses, why will the government not commit $2 billion to help resolve this crisis?

AgricultureOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Prince Edward—Hastings Ontario

Liberal

Lyle Vanclief LiberalMinister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, the government has already increased support and safety nets to farmers by 85% in the last 24 months. The program that we put in place specifically for the 1998 and 1999 business years will deliver $1.6 billion to farmers with assistance from our partnership with the provinces. That program will be continuing into the year 2001.

As a federal government, we are continuing to look at many different ways to work with the provinces and the industry in order to assist farmers with their financial stress in all the ways that we can.

AgricultureOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Dick Proctor NDP Palliser, SK

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are being told by the government that the coming election will be about values. I cannot imagine fundamental values that Canadians hold more dearly and believe in more strongly than fairness and equality. Too often what the government has done to a growing number of Canadian farm families who desperately need a helping hand has been to give them the back of its hand.

The government has large and growing surpluses. Why does it persist in refusing to share some of that with our farm families?

AgricultureOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Prince Edward—Hastings Ontario

Liberal

Lyle Vanclief LiberalMinister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, we have shared and we will continue to share. I suggest to the hon. member that he speak to his provincial government at home, which informed me the other day that it did not have more money to help farmers. It did not see that as its role even at the very same time as it was telling me how important agriculture was to the province. I agree with the provincial government on how important agriculture is to the province, so it has a role to play too.

National DefenceOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Rick Borotsik Progressive Conservative Brandon—Souris, MB

Mr. Speaker, the decision on the future of Manitoba's land forces was to be made months ago. The Minister of National Defence stood in the House and said that the decision would be based on military operations and not on politics.

The report is in place, but the Minister of Foreign Affairs and the minister responsible for western economic diversification did not like the report so they have commissioned their own. I ask the Minister of National Defence, is this not political interference and why will the minister not accept the recommendations of his own military?

National DefenceOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke Ontario

Liberal

Hec Clouthier LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, as the previous member indicated, this weekend is Thanksgiving weekend and all members of the House should give thanks that today, as we speak, the minister is making an announcement concerning our reserves. Today we have dedicated over $42 million to guarantee that our reserves will have a strong and vital future.

We on this side of the House would like to congratulate those courageous, committed citizens of this country who participate in our reserves. The hon. member should know full well that we will do everything to guarantee our reserves.

Atlantic Canada Opportunities AgencyOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Norman E. Doyle Progressive Conservative St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the minister of ACOA.

Operation On-Line is a high tech agency in St. John's, Newfoundland that is nearing the end of a current five year term for federal funding. The minister is holding the agency and all its employees to ransom by demanding that they move from St. John's into his riding. He told the company “Move or I will shut you down.”

How can the minister justify that abuse of his ministerial power, and why is it moving into his riding?

Atlantic Canada Opportunities AgencyOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Gander—Grand Falls Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

George Baker LiberalMinister of Veterans Affairs and Secretary of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency)

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member's information is of course incorrect. This is a federal-provincial agreement that is cost shared between the federal and provincial governments, and here we are with a decision to make. Do we fund, under federal-provincial agreements, businesses in areas of relatively low unemployment inside the overpass or do we fund outside the overpass where there is out-migration, the unemployment rate is high and where the town involved outside is willing to put in $750,000 of its own municipal tax money?

InfrastructureOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Liberal Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the minister responsible for infrastructure. I want the municipalities of Peterborough to get their fair share of federal infrastructure money.

Can the minister give us an update on agreements on infrastructure that have been signed so far with the provinces, and when will Ontario come on side?

InfrastructureOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Durham Ontario

Liberal

Alex Shepherd LiberalParliamentary Secretary to President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, I am happy to report that we have signed agreements with the provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and, this morning, with Prince Edward Island. This represents $131 million. With our partners, that is over $390 million going into new infrastructure in Atlantic Canada. I am also happy to report that the money will be flowing from these projects by the new year.

This summer there were water shortages in Atlantic Canada. I am very happy to report that these programs will be oriented to permitting safer water conditions and a safer and healthier environment for all Canadians including, and most importantly, Atlantic Canadians.

Gun RegistryOral Question Period

October 6th, 2000 / 11:50 a.m.

Reform

Garry Breitkreuz Reform Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, back in 1995 the Liberal government promised parliament and the people that its gun registration scheme known as Bill C-68 would run a deficit of only $2.2 million. It promised us that user fees would cover the entire cost of the program.

Now access to information shows only $17 million in user fees have been collected, yet costs are over half a billion dollars, over $500 million. That is a deficit of over 200 times that projected. How will the Minister of Justice keep her promise?

Gun RegistryOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Erie—Lincoln Ontario

Liberal

John Maloney LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, we cannot look at the costs of the system without looking at the benefits.

I will tell the hon. member some of the benefits. Over 7,701 potentially dangerous gun sales were sent for further investigation, 921 licences were refused and 1,182 licences were revoked. The new registry system has revoked over 20 times more licences than the total over the last five years.

Those are the benefits. This system is working.

International Free Trade Zone At MirabelOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Maurice Dumas Bloc Argenteuil—Papineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, in September the government of Quebec inaugurated an international free trade zone at Mirabel, thus following up on the recommendations of the Tardif commission through a series of actions to assist investors. We are still waiting to hear from the federal government.

What stage is the federal government at with respect to the international free trade zone at Mirabel? Will it stop dragging its feet and finally take action?

International Free Trade Zone At MirabelOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Ottawa South Ontario

Liberal

John Manley LiberalMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I believe that the project proposed is still under study by the Minister of National Revenue. We can consider the proposals which are on the table.

Employment InsuranceOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Michelle Dockrill NDP Bras D'Or, NS

Mr. Speaker, on October 15 women across the globe will march hand in hand, side by side.

One of the issues they are fighting against is poverty and how it affects their families. Meanwhile the government talks about the great strides it has taken for the rights of women in Canada. All of us in this Chamber know that poor children are a result of poor parents.

Can the HRDC minister tell us if, with her government's proposed changes to the EI, a woman who was ineligible for benefits last week will be eligible today?

Employment InsuranceOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Brant Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart LiberalMinister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, the government has shown its recognition of the importance of our youngest citizens, our children.

Most recently we agreed with the provinces to a $2.2 billion investment in the early years. In addition, we have increased our investments to the national child benefit which goes directly to low income families.

With regard to employment insurance, I would tell the hon. member that for women the unemployment rates have come down to the lowest point in the last 25 years. From our point of view the best support for a family is a job.

Atlantic Canada Opportunities AgencyOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Joe Clark Progressive Conservative Kings—Hants, NS

Mr. Speaker, the minister responsible for ACOA has just stated the new government policy that government operations will be moved from lower unemployment communities to higher unemployment communities.

My question for the Deputy Prime Minister is, which other agencies will be moved in accordance with this policy? Will CBC headquarters be moved out of downtown Toronto? Will downtown Toronto lose all its agencies? Will Ottawa be de-populated?

Will the Deputy Prime Minister spell out exactly how—

Atlantic Canada Opportunities AgencyOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Minister of Veterans Affairs.