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House of Commons Hansard #47 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was housing.

Topics

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:30 p.m.

Liberal

Murray Calder Liberal Dufferin—Peel—Wellington—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, the third petition comes from the Caledon area and calls upon parliament to use the federal budget in the year 2000 to introduce a multi-year plan to improve the well-being of Canada's children.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:30 p.m.

Reform

Chuck Cadman Reform Surrey North, BC

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36 I wish to present the third instalment of a petition from Mrs. Nancy Caldwell of Middleton, Nova Scotia.

Mrs. Caldwell has gathered a further 5,200 signatures calling on parliament to enact legislation providing for tougher penalties to be meted out against those who commit sexual assault against children. This brings the total number of signatures to approximately 18,000.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:30 p.m.

Liberal

John O'Reilly Liberal Victoria—Haliburton, ON

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36, I wish to present a petition from the people of Haliburton, Minden and area.

They are calling upon parliament to take all measures necessary to ensure that possession of child pornography remains a serious criminal offence and that federal police forces be directed to give priority to enforcing this law for the protection of our children.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:30 p.m.

Reform

Derrek Konrad Reform Prince Albert, SK

Mr. Speaker, I have four petitions to present.

The first petition I am pleased to present is one from a number of people in my constituency who signed a petition asking parliament to use budget 2000 to introduce a multi-year plan to improve the well-being of Canada's children.

They also request that parliament fulfil the 1989 commitment to end child poverty by the year 2000. I have had this petition on my desk since before Christmas and it is now past the year 2000 mark.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:30 p.m.

Reform

Derrek Konrad Reform Prince Albert, SK

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present a petition on behalf of 467 people from my riding of Prince Albert who are calling on parliament to repeal the expensive and ineffective firearms legislation and to redirect the funds to more cost effective measures aimed at reducing violent crime and improving public safety.

In the petition they list a number of ways in which this could be accomplished.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:30 p.m.

Reform

Derrek Konrad Reform Prince Albert, SK

Mr. Speaker, the third petition concerns strengthening private property rights. The petitioners support the strengthening of property rights in Canada.

They call upon parliament to guarantee that all people will have the right to enjoy their property, the right not to be deprived of it without fair compensation, and the right to appeal when their rights have been infringed upon.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:30 p.m.

Reform

Derrek Konrad Reform Prince Albert, SK

Mr. Speaker, the fourth petition concerns young offenders. It has been signed by a number of my constituents who wish to express their deep concern about crimes committed by youth.

They call upon parliament to bring in new laws to deal with the problem and request that existing laws be vigorously enforced.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:30 p.m.

Liberal

Derek Lee Liberal Scarborough—Rouge River, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition from about 200 Canadians from all parts of the country on the issue of child poverty and the resolution of the House in November 1989.

They call upon parliament to use the federal budget this year, 2000, to introduce a multi-year plan to improve the well-being of Canada's children.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:30 p.m.

NDP

Nelson Riis NDP Kamloops, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is an honour to rise pursuant to Standing Order 36 to present three petitions.

The first petition is on behalf of a number of residents throughout western Canada. They are saying that if we want to actually save some money to the tune of at least $15 million a year, a good thing to do would be to abolish the Senate which would take care of that and I suspect make people across the country an awful lot happier.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:30 p.m.

NDP

Nelson Riis NDP Kamloops, BC

Mr. Speaker, the second petition goes on at some length about people concerned about violent criminals.

They are asking the Parliament of Canada to amend the criminal code to prevent people convicted of serious crimes from being released from custody pending the hearing of their appeals except in exceptional circumstances.

PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:30 p.m.

NDP

Nelson Riis NDP Kamloops, BC

Mr. Speaker, the third petition is about child pornography. Like some of my colleagues have already indicated, people are outraged about the recent developments concerning the child pornography situation in British Columbia.

They are asking parliament to do whatever we can possibly do to strengthen the laws relating to the possession of child pornography and to ensure that it is never legalized.

Questions On The Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

12:35 p.m.

Scarborough—Rouge River Ontario

Liberal

Derek Lee LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the following questions will be answered today: Nos. 59 and 63. .[Text]

Question No. 59—

Questions On The Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

12:35 p.m.

Bloc

Jean-Guy Chrétien Bloc Frontenac—Mégantic, QC

With respect to the federal government's sponsorship for La tournée des 20, a cultural event taking place in the riding of Brome—Missisquoi in 1999, can the government tell us: ( a ) which federal government bodies contributed to the sponsorship; ( b ) what amounts were awarded by these federal bodies to make up the sponsorship; ( c ) for how many years the federal government has been contributing financially to La tournée des 20; and ( d ) what amounts were contributed by Ottawa in each of these years?

Questions On The Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

12:35 p.m.

Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel Québec

Liberal

Alfonso Gagliano LiberalMinister of Public Works and Government Services

(a) Public Works and Government Services Canada; (b) $10,000; (c) one year; and (d) 1999, $10,000.

Question No. 63—

Questions On The Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

12:35 p.m.

Reform

John Williams Reform St. Albert, AB

Regarding the Canadian Rock Festival listed on page 10.4, Volume II, Number II, of the Public Accounts of Canada 1997-98: ( a ) where and when was the festival held; ( b ) how much did the federal government spend or contribute to the event; ( c ) what was received in return for the federal government's contribution; ( d ) who appeared at the festival; ( e ) how much were the performance fees per act; ( f ) why are the six groups or individuals listed going to be compensated for potential legal liability, and ( g ) what was the federal government liable for?

Questions On The Order PaperRoutine Proceedings

12:35 p.m.

Winnipeg South Centre Manitoba

Liberal

Lloyd Axworthy LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

(a) The Canadian Rock Festival listed on page 10.4, Volume II, Number II, of the Public Accounts of Canada 1997-98 did not take place. It had been scheduled for Mexico City, December 7 to 14, 1997.

(b) $27,113.36.

(c) The festival was to promote Canadian rock music and products, CDs and videos, as part of the program marketing Canadian cultural products abroad. The groups which were scheduled to participate are business organizations with products for sale. In addition to live performances the groups were to meet Mexican distributors, Mexican wholesalers and retailers, carry out promotional activities and meet with the Mexican cultural media.

(d) As the event was cancelled, no groups appeared. The groups scheduled to appear were: BTK, Joe's Funeral, superGARAGE, Surrender Dorothy, RED and By Divine Right.

(e) No performance fees were paid by the Government of Canada.

(f) Since the event was cancelled on extremely short notice the groups were compensated for non-refundable airline tickets and other incurred travel costs.

(g) The groups were provided ex gratia payments to cover the cost of the non-refundable airline tickets they had purchased and not used as well as incurred travel costs.

Starred QuestionsRoutine Proceedings

February 11th, 2000 / 12:35 p.m.

Scarborough—Rouge River Ontario

Liberal

Derek Lee LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, would you be so kind as to call Starred Questions Nos. 13, 14 and 58.

Due to the number of responses today, I ask that all three starred questions be printed in Hansard as read.

Starred QuestionsRoutine Proceedings

12:35 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Does the House give its consent to print the answers to the three Starred Question Nos. 13, 14 and 58 as read?

Starred QuestionsRoutine Proceedings

12:35 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed. .[Text]

*Question No. 13—

Starred QuestionsRoutine Proceedings

12:35 p.m.

Reform

Jim Hart Reform Okanagan—Coquihalla, BC

With respect to the Sea King shipborne helicopter which entered into service with the Canadian Armed Forces in 1963: ( a ) what was their original estimated operational lifespan; ( b ) what is their current estimated operational lifespan; ( c ) what measures are being taken to extend the operational life of the Sea King fleet; and ( d ) what are the operational capabilities of the current fleet in the following areas; (i) radius of action, (ii) endurance, (iii) flight in icing, (iv) weapons stations, (v) MAD, (vi) data recording, (vii) EMP/TREE, (viii) aircraft self-protection suite, and (ix) sonobuoy relay?

Starred QuestionsRoutine Proceedings

12:35 p.m.

Scarborough—Rouge River Ontario

Liberal

Derek Lee LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

(a) The original estimated operational lifespan of the Sea King was 15,000 hrs or 25 years, 1988.

(b) The current lifespan of the Sea King has recently been extended to 2005. The aircraft with the most flying hours totals 12,011 hours. The average flying hours for the fleet is approximately 10,511.

(c) The following measures are being taken to extend the operational life of the Sea King:

i. Center Section Repair: This involves replacement of the Main lift frames of the helicopter required as a result of fatigue cracking. Repairs to 19 of the 30 aircraft have already been completed. The replacement of the main lift frames for the remainder of the fleet should be completed by may 2002. Each replacement is performed concurrent with the ongoing third line repair and overhaul contract.

ii. T-58-100 Engine Upgrade: This involves replacing components of the T-58-8F model engine that are no longer available with parts that are more readily available and in widespread commercial use. The upgrade, which also provides more engine power, is performed concurrent with the ongoing third line repair and overhaul contract. Five of 30 aircraft have been fitted with the upgraded engine; upgrades on the remaining aircraft in the fleet are to be completed by May 2002.

iii. T-58 Engine No. 4 Bearing Housing: This involves replacing the current bearing housing as the part is no longer available. This replacement started in 1997 concurrent with the ongoing third line repair and overhaul contract.

iv. Main Gearbox Upgrade: This involves upgrading the main gearbox with more durable internal components and an improved lubrication system, required as a result of flight safety concerns—such as incidents where the gearbox overheated—and the T-58-100 engine upgrade. One of 30 aircraft has been modified with the modification of the remaining aircraft in the fleet to commence in January 2000, to be completed by July 2002.

v. ASN-123 Tactical Navigation System Replacement: This involves replacing the obsolete ANS-501 TACNAV computer with the ASN-123 TACNAV, which is a more modern system. The replacement started in 1997, concurrent with the existing second line periodic inspection effort, at 12 Wing, CFB Shearwater.

vi. DC Power Upgrade: This involves either replacing the transformer rectifier units with solid state devices that are more compatible with some of the more modern avionics recently installed or using in-line-noise suppression filters to clean up the aircraft power. Both options are currently under review. Prototype design and installation should occur in fiscal year 1999-2000, with modifications on the remainder of the fleet to commence in fiscal year 2000-2001.

vii. Emergency Inverter Replacement: Repair parts for the inverter that is currently being used are becoming increasingly difficult to purchase. Prototype design and installation will occur in fiscal year 1999-2000, with replacement on the fleet to commence in fiscal year 2000-2001.

(d) i. & ii. Radius of Action and Endurance: In an anti-submarine warfare configuration, 2 hours 15 minutes, plus 30 minute reserve, and in a surveillance configuration, 2 hours 52 minutes, plus 30 minute reserve.

iii. Flight in Icing: No capability.

iv. Weapons Stations: Two external stations, each capable of one MARK 46 torpedo.

v. MAD—Magnetic Anomaly Detection: Seven of 30 aircraft fitted—CH124B model and operational test and evaluation aircraft.

vi. Data Recording: No mission data recording capability: Commercial video cassette recorder, VCR, available for recording forward looking infra red, FLIR, data.

vii. EMP/TREE—Electro-Magnetic Pulse/Transient Radiation Electrical Effects: No capability.

viii. Aircraft Self-protection Suite: Not fitted. Prototype system fitted and tested in one aircraft. Prototype requires additional engineering.

ix. Sonobuoy relay: One channel 5 minute transmit per 15 minute wait—limitation is high frequency, HF, radio duty cycle.

*Question No. 14—

Starred QuestionsRoutine Proceedings

12:35 p.m.

Reform

Jim Hart Reform Okanagan—Coquihalla, BC

What were the operational capabilities in the statement of requirements for the cancelled EH-101 helicopter in the following areas: (i) radius of action, (ii) endurance, (iii) flight in icing, (iv) weapons stations, (v) MAD, (vi) data recording, (vii) EMP/TREE, (viii) aircraft self-protection suite and (ix) sonobuoy relay?

Starred QuestionsRoutine Proceedings

12:35 p.m.

Scarborough—Rouge River Ontario

Liberal

Derek Lee LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

(i) Radius of Action:

—Sub-surface surveillance: 100 nautical mile transit, 1.5 hours on station, 30 minute attack, 100 nautical mile transit, 30 minute fuel reserve;

—Surface surveillance: 40 nautical mile transit, 4 hours on station, 40 nautical mile transit, 20 minute fuel reserve.

(ii) Endurance:

—Sub-surface surveillance: 4 hours 10 minutes—3 hours 40 minutes, plus 30 minute safety reserve;

—Surface surveillance: 5 hours 10 minutes—4 hours 40 minutes plus 30 minute safety reserve).

(iii) Flight in icing: Equipment required to permit continuous flight operations in icing conditions at pressure altitudes up to and including 10,000 ft.

(iv) Weapons Stations: Two external 1,500 lb. weapon stations, each capable of carrying one MARK 46 torpedo or next generation weapon.

(v) MAD—Magnectic Anomaly Detection: Essential.

(vi) Data recording: Aircraft must have equipment that is capable of recording passive and active acoustics, forward looking infra red, FLIR, electronic warfare, communications and mission data, and must be equipped with cockpit voice recorder/flight data recorder, CVR/FDR.

(vii) EMP/TREE—Electro-Magnetic Pulse/Transient Radiation Electrical Effects. Essential that aircraft have the capability to continue operations after being subjected to EMP and TREE.

(viii) Aircraft Self-protection Suite: Essential that an electronic warfare sub-system and self-protection countermeasures are provided.

(ix) Sonobuoy Relay: Essential that a single channel sono-relay capability be provided.

*Question No. 58—

Starred QuestionsRoutine Proceedings

12:35 p.m.

Reform

Jim Pankiw Reform Saskatoon—Humboldt, SK

With regard to the $1.5 billion in assistance that the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food pledged to farmers under the agricultural income disaster assistance program, AIDA, what has the government determined to be the amount paid out to Saskatchewan farmers as of November 30, 1999?

Starred QuestionsRoutine Proceedings

12:35 p.m.

Scarborough—Rouge River Ontario

Liberal

Derek Lee LiberalParliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the Hourse of Commons

As of December 1, 1999, $100,717,300 had been paid out to Saskatchewan farmers.