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House of Commons Hansard #101 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was security.

Topics

HealthOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

The Speaker

Order. I am sure the House wants to hear the Minister of Industry.

HealthOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Brian Tobin Liberal Bonavista—Trinity—Conception, NL

Mr. Speaker, the drug patent act is there and it is being respected by everybody, including members of the government.

There is no question that the action taken by the Minister of Health put first the security, the health and the safety of Canadians. Nobody should argue with that.

HealthOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Rick Borotsik Progressive Conservative Brandon—Souris, MB

Mr. Speaker, once again the Prime Minister has to defend the Minister of Health. It is the same Prime Minister who will not allow the Minister of Health membership into the most powerful committee overseeing public security and anti-terrorism.

The Minister of Health has a reputation of faulty judgment: the Airbus fiasco, the gun registry, Pearson airport, and now Cipro. Is that why the Prime Minister will not allow the Minister of Health to sit on the most powerful and influential committee?

HealthOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, Canadians can see for themselves how important the health issues are at this time.

In fact any Canadians watching the spectacle of the opposition parties today will say to themselves, what are those people thinking, what are they talking about? The priority is protection of the health of Canadians.

That is what Health Canada did. We acted to make sure we had the medications we need. Those people are totally out of touch with what is really important to Canadians.

HealthOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Deborah Grey Canadian Alliance Edmonton North, AB

Mr. Speaker, what we are asking is for the minister to obey the law.

Yesterday the minister said “I am in charge here”. He is so in charge that his boss forgot to put him on the security committee. He is so in charge that he is standing by his officials, but those same officials are forced to take the blame for breaking the patent law. He is so in charge that he swallowed the Apotex fee. It is amazing.

When is the Prime Minister going to say to the Minister of Health “You are the weakest link. Goodbye”?

HealthOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, there they go again.

Canadians are focused on reality. They are concerned to make sure that their government is protecting them and arranging things so if the unlikely event occurs we will be ready. That is what we are focusing on. All we hear from the other side is noise about committees and process. This government is attuned to what is important to Canadians. I am going to continue acting aggressively to make sure their health is protected.

The EconomyOral Question Period

October 24th, 2001 / 2:45 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jason Kenney Canadian Alliance Calgary Southeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, it is nice to see the industry minister lining up his colleague in health for second ballot support.

The Bank of Canada recognizes that the economy is in deep trouble but the finance minister does not. The Bank of Canada has acted to shore up the economy but the finance minister has not. In fact, he has waited 652 days and for the onset of a recession to schedule a budget.

Instead of leaving it to the bank to fight this Liberal recession alone, will the finance minister commit to accelerate tax cuts, to put money into the pockets of working families today when they need it the most?

The EconomyOral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin LiberalMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, what the Bank of Canada recognizes is that by the elimination of the deficit, it is in a position to act. What the Bank of Canada recognizes is that by the paydown of $35 billion worth of debt, the Bank of Canada is in a position to act. What the Bank of Canada recognizes as a result of the massive tax cuts brought down by this government in the stimulation of the economy is that it is in a position to act. That is what the Bank of Canada recognizes.

The EconomyOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jason Kenney Canadian Alliance Calgary Southeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, what the finance minister does not seem to realize is that thousands of Canadians are getting laid off every week. Hundreds of layoffs have been announced today. Those people get no succour from his political rhetoric. They want action. They got it from the Bank of Canada yesterday. Are they going to get action from the finance minister to stimulate the economy to prevent a Liberal recession from killing even more jobs? Will he cut taxes? Will he accelerate that tax relief to help Canadians from losing their jobs?

The EconomyOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin LiberalMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, what every single economist in this country recognizes is that if the government had proceeded with the tax cutting plan of the opposition we would be in a deficit and there would have been no opportunity for the bank to act. What Canadians recognize is that if we had engaged in the slash and burn of all of our social programs recommended by the Alliance, Canadians would not have the underlying support that they require in this tough time. What Canadians recognize is that virtually every single policy brought down by the Alliance Party is a policy of perdition and not what this country requires in this time period.

Anti-Terrorism LegislationOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Bellehumeur Bloc Berthier—Montcalm, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday information commissioner John Reid told the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights that it would be preferable to remove from the anti-terrorism bill all the clauses granting the Minister of Justice the exceptional power to suspend the application of the Access to Information Act as she sees fit.

Given this eloquent testimony from a protector of individual rights, will the minister, who has always said that she was anxious to hear from witnesses, listen to this expert rather than listening to her own department's hardliners on security?

Anti-Terrorism LegislationOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton West Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, we certainly know of Mr. Reid's opinion and we respect his opinion. He is one of a number of witnesses the House of Commons and Senate committees will be hearing from. As I said before, we look forward to the advice and recommendations of the committee.

Anti-Terrorism LegislationOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Bellehumeur Bloc Berthier—Montcalm, QC

Mr. Speaker, with special legislation, such as Bill C-36, it is important to maintain a balance between security and civil liberties. In committee, witnesses have told us that this bill is dangerous, goes too far and grants outrageous powers. This is serious.

In turning a deaf ear to those who recommend striking a balance between security and freedoms, and in listening only to those who are concerned with security, is the minister not herself upsetting the balance that the Prime Minister wished to preserve at all costs?

Anti-Terrorism LegislationOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton West Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as we have said from the beginning, we believe this is a balanced package that is respectful not only of Canadians' needs in relation to safety and security but respectful of their rights guaranteed in the charter.

As I also have said throughout this process, the people I am going to listen to are the members of the House committee and the members of the Senate committee. I look forward to the advice and recommendations they have to offer us.

National SecurityOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Paul Forseth Canadian Alliance New Westminster—Coquitlam—Burnaby, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Foreign Affairs is in the U.S. today to meet with homeland defence secretary Governor Ridge to plead with the Americans to ease up on their border delays for commerce.

Could the Prime Minister explain to Canadians what concrete actions he has taken to show our partner and neighbour to the south that Canada has taken serious steps to improve continental security since September 11?

National SecurityOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Saint-Maurice Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, we want the movement of goods to be as it was before September 11 with the Americans. The Minister of Foreign Affairs is discussing that today in Washington. I had the occasion to raise it with the president while I was in Shanghai, China. I clearly made the point and the same day the president called the secretary of the treasury who informed the Minister of Finance that the Prime Minister had talked about the problem with the president that very day.

National SecurityOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Paul Forseth Canadian Alliance New Westminster—Coquitlam—Burnaby, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canada must be seen as a good neighbour. Yesterday we presented in the House a plan for security perimeter measures including more powers for customs and immigration officers and detaining questionable claimants. So when the foreign affairs minister meets with Governor Ridge, would taking these concrete actions not speak better for Canada than unfulfilled Liberal promises?

National SecurityOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Outremont Québec

Liberal

Martin Cauchon LiberalMinister of National Revenue and Secretary of State (Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec)

Mr. Speaker, we have every reason to be proud of our Canadian customs system. We have taken some concrete actions. Two weeks ago we announced more technology and more resources.

I must report to the House that the meeting between my foreign affairs colleague and Governor Ridge this morning went very well. They were very positive with regard to the situation at the border. We recognize that we have to work in co-operation. As well they have been quite open minded with regard to the use of technology to proceed with much better risk assessment. What we are going to put in place is a high tech, smart border that will better serve all Canadians.

Veterans AffairsOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Bryon Wilfert Liberal Oak Ridges, ON

Mr. Speaker, for three months in 1945 Canadian airmen were subjected to very harsh treatment, not as prisoners in a prisoner of war camp but as inmates at Buchenwald concentration camp. These airmen were mistakenly arrested as civilians and endured inhumane conditions as well as being forced to work.

What is the Minister of Veterans Affairs doing to recognize and compensate these brave individuals?

Veterans AffairsOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Saint Boniface Manitoba

Liberal

Ronald J. Duhamel LiberalMinister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, yesterday we issued an announcement saying that these 15 airmen will be compensated by the German government as a result of the law that addresses the whole issue of slave labour. This is great news.

There will be 15 airmen who will be compensated. As well, there were four airmen who died before the legislation came into effect. The Canadian government will give the same amount of money to their spouses. That is $5,400--

Veterans AffairsOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Calgary East.

Minister for International CooperationOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Deepak Obhrai Canadian Alliance Calgary East, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Minister for International Cooperation used her cabinet position for personal electoral gain. A CIDA contract given to her senior campaign workers was signed after the event had taken place on her personal recommendation and to the benefit of no one but herself.

She has tarnished her department's reputation. There is only one course of action and that is for her to resign. Will the Prime Minister ask for her resignation?

Minister for International CooperationOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine Québec

Liberal

Marlene Jennings LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister for International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, these are the same outrageous allegations which were stated in the House yesterday. The facts are clear. The facts do not change because the question is asked 3 million times. Those contracts were awarded in full compliance with treasury board guidelines.

Minister for International CooperationOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Deepak Obhrai Canadian Alliance Calgary East, AB

Mr. Speaker, I agree with her that the facts do not change. The fact is the minister used her position for personal gain. The minister openly disregarded the principles of transparency and fairness.

This is a minister that goes around the world preaching for fairness and an end to patronage. She herself cannot follow her own preachings. She is an embarrassment to Canada.

Will the Prime Minister ask for her immediate resignation?

Minister for International CooperationOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine Québec

Liberal

Marlene Jennings LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister for International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, I have great pride, as does everyone on this side of the House, in stating that the Minister for International Cooperation is an outstanding minister.

The contracts the member refers to were awarded in full compliance with treasury board rules and guidelines.