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House of Commons Hansard #103 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was health.

Topics

National DefenceOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

York Centre Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton LiberalMinister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, no, we will not be restoring the Canadian airborne regiment, but the first part of her question was about resources.

The government has over the last three years provided $3 billion more in resources. The government has made it abundantly clear that for anything that we ask our Canadian forces to do, we will make sure they get the resources to do that job. We will not ask of them something that they are not trained to do. We will not ask of them something for which we do not give them the resources. The government will give them what is necessary to fight terrorism.

Tourism IndustryOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Yolande Thibeault Liberal Saint-Lambert, QC

Mr. Speaker, recently the minister responsible for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency commented on the economic impact of the September 11 events on the Atlantic region and its tourism markets in the northeastern U.S.

Can the minister responsible for the ACOA tell the House how this information will foster the adoption of future tourism promotion strategies that will benefit the Atlantic region?

Tourism IndustryOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

West Nova Nova Scotia

Liberal

Robert Thibault LiberalMinister of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency)

Mr. Speaker, every dog has his day.

Good agreements between ACOA and the Atlantic provinces are enabling us to minimize the negative effects of the events of September 11.

One excellent example of partnership is that of the Atlantic Canada tourist industry. This year, in conjunction with the Government of Canada, the Atlantic provinces and the tourist industry are investing $5 million to promote Atlantic Canada in the northeastern U.S.

I invite the Americans as well as all Canadians to come and visit the Atlantic region.

TerrorismOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Peter Goldring Canadian Alliance Edmonton Centre-East, AB

Mr. Speaker, last week the staff on Parliament Hill were issued high tech rubber gloves to open the mail. This five-fingered prophylactic is not a solution.

The United States surgeon general states that technology is available to develop equipment to sanitize and make mail safe from bacteria such as anthrax.

What is being done in Canada to procure this new equipment to protect our Canadian postal workers and postal customers? Is Canada Post now investing in mail sanitizing equipment?

TerrorismOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel Québec

Liberal

Alfonso Gagliano LiberalMinister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for asking me this question at this time.

At this moment as we speak, the Canada Post president is in Boston meeting with American counterparts about postal administration and they are working together to address this problem.

The member will be surprised to hear that we will have the same equipment and same machinery as the Americans. We want to make sure that we protect all our postal workers and all Canadians.

TerrorismOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Peter Goldring Canadian Alliance Edmonton Centre-East, AB

Mr. Speaker, obviously there is a great concern for the safety of the mail system. Public confidence in the postal system is essential to the normal functioning of the economy and the lives of Canadians.

I believe that Canadian manufacturing technology can be brought to bear against this terrorist tool of war. Will the minister advise how and in what way Canadian industry is being encouraged to develop, produce and deliver this new technology?

TerrorismOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel Québec

Liberal

Alfonso Gagliano LiberalMinister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, right now we are facing an emergency situation and therefore we will collaborate with our neighbours and make sure that everyone is protected.

In the meantime, if Canadian industry also makes available Canadian manufactured tools that we can use, our objective is to make sure that our more than 50,000 postal employees are protected and all Canadians are protected. The Canada Post administration will do everything in its power to ensure that protection.

Guaranteed Income SupplementOral Question Period

October 26th, 2001 / 11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Marcel Gagnon Bloc Champlain, QC

Mr. Speaker, we recently learned that over 380,000 Canadians are not receiving the guaranteed income supplement, even though they are eligible for it.

We are talking about millions of dollars that Human Resources Development Canada is literally stealing from the neediest members of our society.

Does the Minister of Human Resources Development intend to eliminate the 11 month retroactivity threshold, so that elderly people will receive the money that is owed to them?

Guaranteed Income SupplementOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Laval West Québec

Liberal

Raymonde Folco LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, we are well aware that the guaranteed income supplement issue is now being reviewed by the Standing Committee on Human Resources Development, on which I sit, and that we are almost ready to submit a report to the minister.

As soon as that report is in the hands of the minister, we will see how she will react to it.

Aboriginal AffairsOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Stan Dromisky Liberal Thunder Bay—Atikokan, ON

Mr. Speaker, the communal licence issued to the Burnt Church First Nation for the food, social and ceremonial fishery this fall expired at midnight last Saturday.

The expiry of the licence marks the end of a fishery that many Canadians anticipated with concern. Many aboriginals and non-aboriginals around Miramichi Bay wondered if the fall of 2001 would bring a repeat of the open conflicts of 1999 and 2000.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans report to the House on the state of affairs of the fisheries affected by the supreme court's Marshall decision?

Aboriginal AffairsOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Bonaventure—Gaspé—Îles-De-La-Madeleine—Pabok Québec

Liberal

Georges Farrah LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleague for his good question.

We were very pleased to see that this year the situation in Burnt Church improved a lot.

As we know, fishing in Burnt Church has always been a relatively sensitive issue. This year, the permit for subsistence fishing that was delivered to that community allowed it to catch lobster, mostly, while complying with the regulations and the act.

However, there is still a lot of work to do, because we must reach a long term agreement with Burnt Church. We will work very hard during the winter to reach such an agreement with this aboriginal community.

Anti-terrorism LegislationOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Scott Reid Canadian Alliance Lanark—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, the United Kingdom and the United States, the two key players in the war on terrorism, understand that enhanced police powers must be coupled with stronger checks and balances. Both countries have passed provisions for compensation of people whose property or whose person is arrested wrongfully through new anti-terrorism laws.

If the government will not allow for a sunset clause as a way to protect Canadian civil liberties, will it amend Bill C-36 to guarantee full financial compensation for any Canadian who may be wrongfully detained in the new anti-terrorism dragnet?

Anti-terrorism LegislationOral Question Period

Noon

Vancouver Quadra B.C.

Liberal

Stephen Owen LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, there are well established rules in Canadian law for governments to be held civilly liable for mistaken actions by police or by prosecutors. Of course these civil remedies will always be available to Canadians who may have their rights infringed in any way by public authorities.

Pay EquityOral Question Period

Noon

Bloc

Jocelyne Girard-Bujold Bloc Jonquière, QC

Mr. Speaker, at last the federal court is going to hear the case of 6,000 public servants, mainly from the Office of the Auditor General, CSIS and the Health Research Institute, in connection with pay equity.

Yesterday, the President of the Treasury Board's reply suggested that she would be supporting the employers. Can she clarify her stand for us? Does she mean she will provide them with financial support for the legal proceedings or for pay equity?

Pay EquityOral Question Period

Noon

Westmount—Ville-Marie Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard LiberalPresident of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for Infrastructure

Mr. Speaker, I thought I made it very clear yesterday. I said that the equity settlement applied some months ago was solely for employees whose employer was treasury board.

However, as far as the separate employers are concerned, if they are able to demonstrate that they have a pay equity problem within their organization, treasury board is prepared to support them and has, moreover, already done so in some cases. That is the context within which treasury board can intervene.

Patent LegislationOral Question Period

Noon

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis NDP Winnipeg North Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the health minister said he has strong views when it comes to the multinational drug industry. Certainly this week he has shown he does not have much respect for the drug patent act.

It would certainly be nice to know if there is going to be more to the health minister's position than just tough talk. Would he end this difficult week for him by clearing the air and indicating to all Canadians, does he support the Mulroney drug patent act, yes or no?

Patent LegislationOral Question Period

Noon

Etobicoke Centre Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I know it is Friday and the opposition is limping lamely toward the end of the week exhausted from five days of chasing its own tail. Even to those members it must be obvious that what the issue of this week has been about really is the protection of public health, will Canadians have access to what they need to be protected in these difficult and dangerous times.

It is clear also this government, this minister and Health Canada have acted to protect public health. We have what we need on good terms for Canadians. We will continue to do what we have been doing.

Coast GuardOral Question Period

Noon

Progressive Conservative

Loyola Hearn Progressive Conservative St. John's West, NL

Mr. Speaker, earlier today the solicitor general said “We have beefed up the coast guard by requiring them now to call in 96 hours in advance”. His own people, the people in the Department of Fisheries and Oceans responsible, will tell us the onus is on the captain to make the call. If a boat does not call we do not know it is in our waters because cutbacks have caused the coast guard to be almost eliminated, 20% coverage by radar.

Should not terrorists at least have to have a reservation confirmed before we let them into the country?

Coast GuardOral Question Period

Noon

Bonaventure—Gaspé—Îles-De-La-Madeleine—Pabok Québec

Liberal

Georges Farrah LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. member is well aware, the decision taken by our government is to ensure that, in light of the present situation, vessels notify us 96 hours prior to arrival in Canadian waters instead of 24.

The same thing applies to the 96 hour notice as when it was 24. The coast guard works in close collaboration with Customs Canada, Transport Canada and the U.S. coast guard to ensure the safety and security of Canadians.

Order in Council AppointmentsRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Leeds—Grenville Ontario

Liberal

Joe Jordan LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Madam Speaker, I am pleased to table, in both official languages, a number of order in council appointments made recently by the government.

Government Response to PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Leeds—Grenville Ontario

Liberal

Joe Jordan LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Madam Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8) I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to five petitions.

Committees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

Madam Speaker, the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade has the honour to present its ninth report.

In accordance with its order of reference of Tuesday, October 2, your committee has considered Bill C-31, an act to amend the Export Development Act and to make consequential amendments to other acts, and agreed on Thursday, October 25 to report it without amendment. A copy of the relevant minutes of proceedings for meetings numbers 33, 35 and 36 is tabled.

Committees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Leeds—Grenville Ontario

Liberal

Joe Jordan LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Madam Speaker, I have the honour to present the 33rd report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs regarding the membership of standing committees and of the Special Committee on Non-Medical Use of Drugs.

Madam Speaker, if the House gives its consent, I move that the 33rd report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs be concurred in.

Committees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Ms. Bakopanos)

Is there agreement?

Committees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

(Motion agreed to)