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House of Commons Hansard #117 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was security.

Topics

HousingStatements By Members

November 22nd, 2001 / 2 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Liberal Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, as the weather grows colder many of us are already thinking about spending time with our loved ones during the upcoming holiday season. Unfortunately for thousands of Canadians the winter also brings on a season of fear and worry for those without a home and simply trying to survive on the street.

In response the federal government adopted a strategy to draw together the resources of local communities to develop unique solutions that address the needs of individual communities. In my own riding of Ottawa Centre the Minister of Labour who is responsible for homelessness initiatives has worked tirelessly to support partnerships between all levels of government, non-profit organizations and the private sector.

These combined efforts will go a long way to support transitional housing initiatives and help people move from shelters to independent living arrangements. By working together we can eliminate the root causes of homelessness in Canada.

UkraineStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Ken Epp Canadian Alliance Elk Island, AB

Mr. Speaker, it was 69 years ago that Stalin unleashed his fury against millions of innocent Ukrainians. This was a holocaust which is largely ignored, mostly forgotten and very seldom mentioned in what we call polite society. People want to put it away and forget that it happened.

What happened was that Stalin decided these people would be put away and that farmers would be collectivized. There were many who objected to having their property taken away and as a result they were systematically shot. Stalin brought in individuals whose job it was to exterminate these people. Many intellectuals were killed.

The number was not known, but with the archives in Russia now being opened it is confirmed that at least seven million Ukrainians thus died very sadly.

UkraineStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Walt Lastewka Liberal St. Catharines, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House today to ask Canadians to mark November 24 as a day of remembrance for the more than seven million Ukrainians who were victims of the famine and genocide of 1932-33.

This famine was not a result of natural causes but was perpetrated by the communist leader of the time, Josef Stalin. In a move to force both farmers and peasants into collective farming Stalin increased the grain procurement quota for Ukraine by 44%, knowing that this would cause a grain shortage which would result in the inability of both farmers and peasants to feed themselves. Soviet law stated that no grain would be provided to Ukraine until the quota was met. This action resulted in over seven million Ukrainians dying.

On November 26, 1998, Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma issued a presidential decree designating every fourth Saturday of November as the National Day of Remembrance of the victims of this horrific act. This weekend on November 24 Canadians will join with millions of Ukrainians throughout the world to mark this terrible event.

It is my sincere hope as a Canadian of Ukrainian descent that the world will learn from this tragic episode in history and ensure that it will never happen again in the future.

PeaceStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Karen Redman Liberal Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, from November 18 to November 25 YMCAs across Canada recognize peace week. Peace has many dimensions. It is not only the state of relationships among nations. We cannot expect to live in a world of peace if we are unable to live in peace with those close to us, even those who differ from us. The responsibility for peace begins with individuals in relationship with family and friends and extends to community life and national activities.

Two remarkable Kitchener residents have been honoured for their contributions to peace. Maureen Murphy received the Peace Medallion for her work in alternative dispute resolution. Maureen works with young offenders and their families to achieve a peaceful resolution and return the family to full functioning.

Through her work at the AR Kaufman Family YMCA, Donna Perk goes above and beyond to ensure the YMCA's youngest members feel welcome and part of a very special community.

I ask the House to join me in congratulating Maureen Murphy and Donna Perk for their achievements in peacebuilding.

AfghanistanStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Jean Augustine Liberal Etobicoke—Lakeshore, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to inform the House that on November 22 and 23 the Canadian government will support a conference organized by South Asia Partnership Canada.

The Afghanistan of Tomorrow Conference will bring together over 100 participants including Afghan Canadian community leaders, Afghan intellectuals, tribal leaders and Afghan women activists from Canada, the United States, Pakistan and Europe together with Canadian NGOs, humanitarian workers, students, parliamentarians, policy makers and government officials.

Participants at the two day conference will work to develop policy recommendations for long term peacebuilding strategies in Afghanistan that reflect Afghan solutions to Afghan problems.

This exciting conference is sponsored in part by the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade human security program. Our time honoured role for which we are well known and respected throughout the world is one of peace and capacity building and expertise in this conference.

Western CanadaStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Carol Skelton Canadian Alliance Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar, SK

Mr. Speaker, I recently attended the mid-term convention of the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities. Resolution No. 6 put forward by the RM of Sarnia stated that due to Saskatchewan having little input into our central Canadian political system and the fact that the current government seems not to care about the crisis in agriculture, the possibility of joining the United States should be investigated.

The motion was defeated by a small margin but its introduction certainly says something about the current state of life on the prairies. There is a prevailing feeling of alienation. This alienation is not self-imposed but caused by the example given by the government that anything east of Quebec or west of Ontario is of little consequence.

I am saddened that the government has chosen by its actions, and in most cases lack of action, to provoke such strong feelings of alienation.

ViolenceStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Paddy Torsney Liberal Burlington, ON

Mr. Speaker, the International Day to End Violence Against Women is November 25. It is a day chosen as the anniversary of the brutal assassination of the Mirabal sisters in the Dominican Republic in the 1960s.

These three sisters known as the Unforgettable Butterflies were symbols of dignity and inspiration for their struggle for freedom and respect for human rights in the face of an oppressive regime. In their memory people come together around the world on November 25 to denounce gender violence in all its forms: domestic battery, rape and sexual harassment, state violence, torture and abuse of female political prisoners.

On November 25 all Canadians can mark this day and recommit to doing everything they can to end violence against all women everywhere.

Chambre de commerce et d'industrie de DrummondStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Bloc Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Chambre de commerce et d'industrie de Drummond recently recognized area business people, highlighting the unflagging work of the women and men that make Drummondville businesses some of the best businesses in Quebec.

Armotec, owned by François Beaudoin, a sovereignist, won the Prix Distinction and the Napoléon award for exports. This kitchen hardware and furniture manufacturing business distinguished itself as one of 14 winning businesses.

Gilles Soucy, of the Soucy group, won the builder prize for 2001. From modest beginnings, Mr. Soucy now heads a number of parts and accessories companies for the recreational, commercial and military sectors.

And the business person of the year award went to André Paquin, an associate of the firm Verrier Paquin Hébert.

I would like to congratulate all of the winners as well as the nominees for this year that is coming to a close. May they serve as examples to other entrepreneurs to inspire them in their pursuit of excellence.

SaarGummi CompanyStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Paradis Liberal Brome—Missisquoi, QC

Mr. Speaker, on Tuesday, with my colleague the Secretary of State for the Economic Development Agency of Canada, I visited SaarGummi Quebec, a company located in Magog that specializes in rubber joints used by the automotive industry.

We announced the creation of more than 800 jobs in addition to the 800 already existing jobs. GM has confirmed that they have awarded major contracts over a five year period.

SaarGummi is now the largest employer in Magog, and this does not take into account the indirect employment created and the economic spinoff for the region's suppliers.

This is a success that belongs to the people of the Eastern Townships. It reflects our economic vitality and the quality of our workforce.

Speaking of vitality, I would like to wish our deputy whip, the member for Brossard—La Prairie a very happy birthday.

National War MemorialStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Roy H. Bailey Canadian Alliance Souris—Moose Mountain, SK

Mr. Speaker, on this past November 11 Canadians turned out in record numbers to show their respect to those who paid the supreme sacrifice protecting our nation.

Just a few days later the government hosted the G-20 conference. There were legal protestors but as usual the hooligans showed up and they performed the lowest type of national disgrace we have ever witnessed. They defaced the National War Memorial and Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

To trample across the gravesite and write their slogans on the memorial was a display of insolence, contempt and, above all, an insult to Canadians who remember their loved ones. Citizens all across the country must speak out and clearly let it be known that we reject this type of behaviour and will not stand for people who abuse our freedoms that others have fought so dearly for.

YukonStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Larry Bagnell Liberal Yukon, YT

Mr. Speaker, first I would like to thank all parties in the House for their tremendous support of Yukon and the Yukon Act.

I would also like to say a few words on an important issue.

In the Yukon, there is a dynamic and productive francophone community. Over the past 20 years, that community has succeeded in slowing down assimilation and it is actually growing. It is an economic asset for the Yukon. Today, a few members of the Franco-Yukon community are with us. I welcome them here.

Along with their allies, francophones in the Yukon are building Canadian unity and contributing to the success of the coexistence of Canada's two official languages.

As regards health services, the Franco-Yukon community has been trying to be recognized by Health Canada since 1993.

It also wants the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development to recognize it as a legitimate nordic people. Francophones in the Yukon are asking that their rights be clearly included in the new Yukon Act.

For the sake of Canadian unity, a sin of repetition is better than a sin of omission.

The MediaStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Wendy Lill NDP Dartmouth, NS

Mr. Speaker, for the most part journalists are professionals, but to suggest they have no personal opinions would be to say they are not people. Norman Lester is no more, no less.

When media workers start writing a story their experience is brought to bear so we are presented with the facts in an understandable, balanced and unbiased fashion. We want our professional journalists to know what is happening in the world. It makes for better stories and more accurate information. To say they should somehow abandon their rights to free expression because they work for a broadcaster would be wrong.

There is no indication that Norman Lester has ever been a biased journalist. I sincerely hope that the administrative review currently underway at Radio-Canada will look at Mr. Lester's professional work, not attempt to deal with what are appropriate opinions for journalists to hold on their own time.

I call on the government to introduce mandatory complaint mechanisms for all media so Canadians can complain about rampant biased journalism which currently exists. I also call on Radio-Canada to leave Mr. Lester's rights when he is off the job alone.

Heritage MinutesStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Bloc Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, another famous journalist took an interest in the Heritage Minutes . At the end of the eighties, Patrick Watson was invited at a brainstorming session where Charles Bronfman made the following comment:

If we can take one minute on television to convince people that Corn Flakes cereals, sanitary napkins or Cadillacs are interesting, could we not take a minute to convince Canadians that Canada is interesting?

The Heritage Minutes were born, with the objective of making people like Canada.

In 1988, Patrick Watson became the creative director and chief writer of the Heritage Minutes , which were funded by the CRB Foundation, Canada Post, Power Broadcasting, McDonald's, Canadian Airlines, the Weston Foundation, Bell Canada and the Government of Canada. In 1989, Mr. Watson was appointed President of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, a position which he held until 1994, without ever stopping working on the Heritage Minutes .

So, when someone presents the official version of Canada's history on the CBC, he goes up the corporate ladder, like Patrick Watson.

The Canadian FrancophonieStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Liberal Beauséjour—Petitcodiac, NB

Mr. Speaker, Équipe Francophonie 2001, a coalition of French-speaking and Acadian communities, is in Ottawa today.

I would like to take this opportunity to remind hon. members of the federal government's commitment to Canada's francophones.

To cite a few examples, along with the provinces and the territories, the federal government guarantees minority communities access to education in their language. It has helped the University of Ottawa to set up its Centre national de formation en santé. It has renewed its official language support programs and allocated additional funding to them. The Prime Minister has created a position responsible for co-ordinating everything relating to official languages.

One thing is certain; the Government of Canada is working hard for the preservation and expansion of the culture, traditions and language of Canada's 6.6 million francophones.

Bill C-42Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Val Meredith Canadian Alliance South Surrey—White Rock—Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, while there are a few long overdue changes in Bill C-42 they are overshadowed by the continuation of the government's disturbing trend of making parliament irrelevant.

Much of the bill gives government ministers carte blanche to implement by regulation instead of passing legislation through parliament. For example, not only does the bill give the transport minister sole authority to decide what type of airport screening system there will be in Canada. He will decide how it is to be paid for.

For eight years the Liberal government has transferred one legislative authority after another to the executive branch of government. However if the Liberals plan on delegating parliament's authority to impose taxes we might as well just close the doors and go home.

While the coalition has put forth proposals to increase parliamentary oversight, why do the Liberals continue to weaken the authority of the House?

Airline SecurityOral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla B.C.

Canadian Alliance

Stockwell Day Canadian AllianceLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, it has been three months since terrorists took jet passenger planes, turned them into deadly missiles and killed thousands of innocent citizens. Since then, Canadians have been asking for a few signs of confidence to restore security to airlines.

The government has finally tabled a bill. There are no clear steps of action, even on something as simple as providing air marshals. All Canadians remember is the minister saying he would rather see jet airliners shot down than providing air marshals on airlines.

Why will he not give a clear signal--

Airline SecurityOral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Minister of Transport.

Airline SecurityOral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Don Valley East Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I do not mind the hon. Leader of the Opposition rising today to make his point, but please, I ask him to not make false statements like that in the House of Commons.

The fact of the matter is, every aspect of aviation security is under review and has been under review since September. We have not precluded any measure. In fact on the particular issue of armed force on airplanes, which seems to titillate the member to no end, we have made those provisions for certain flights because the U.S. requested them to Washington Reagan airport.

Airline SecurityOral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla B.C.

Canadian Alliance

Stockwell Day Canadian AllianceLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, one flight to the United States. That is all he cares about? That is ridiculous.

Today's bill is nothing but an empty shell. There is nothing in it about putting sky marshals on board.

Can the Prime Minister explain why this bill has nothing concrete to offer in the way of improving travellers' safety and security?

Airline SecurityOral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Don Valley East Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, this is incredible. The Leader of the Opposition is a Calgary MP and makes weekly use of airline services.

All passengers are aware that we have stepped up security regulations throughout the country, because we have the best security in the world.

Airline SecurityOral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla B.C.

Canadian Alliance

Stockwell Day Canadian AllianceLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, since September 11 Canadians have asked for a sign of confidence in airline security. They have only asked for a few things. Security on the airlines. They want to see some steps taken for fugitives from other countries on the airlines to have proper documents. There is no action on that one from the government. They want to see something on the ground in terms of increased security. There are no clear steps of action.

The government took these requests, it laboured over them and after all its supposed labour it produced a mouse. Why will the government not produce effective legislation to protect travellers on airlines?

Airline SecurityOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Don Valley East Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, something the Leader of the Opposition has overlooked is that the Aeronautics Act has given the powers traditionally to the Minister of Transport to put in the kind of regulations that all people feel necessary.

I would ask the hon. Leader of the Opposition this weekend to go home to Calgary and read the Aeronautics Act as it is. He will see that we have the power. We have used the power and that is why we have the best security system.

Airline SecurityOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

James Moore Canadian Alliance Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, if we had the best security in the world, we would not need this legislation.

The United States introduced eight weeks ago comprehensive security for airlines. In eight weeks it introduced, debated, amended and finally signed into law this past Tuesday comprehensive airline security legislation.

It took the government 11 weeks just to introduce this weak, bare bones, wimpy legislation that does next to nothing for airport security. Why did it take the government and the transport minister so long to deliver to Canadians so little?

Airline SecurityOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Don Valley East Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I sat in the House earlier, after the hon. member made his statement. Of course I did not have the right of reply but I have it now.

He listed a whole range of things that he says the Americans have in their legislation that we do not have in ours. It is not in the bill because it is in the act as it stands. We have been ahead of the Americans. I would like him to get that and appreciate that.

Airline SecurityOral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

James Moore Canadian Alliance Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker--