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House of Commons Hansard #33 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was seniors.

Topics

Mirabel AirportOral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Winnipeg South Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock LiberalPresident of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, it is really important to understand that what the minister is doing, as the Minister of Transport is charged, is working back and forth across the country on behalf of the Government of Canada and the people of Canada and making decisions on the use of the transportation resources. He has done that in this case.

JusticeOral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Joy Smith Conservative Kildonan—St. Paul, MB

Mr. Speaker, a recent study revealed that almost 30% of 15 to 17 year olds and 47% of 18 to 19 year olds have used marijuana in the past year. It is easier to get marijuana on to schoolyards than it is to get cigarettes and alcohol. Yet the government is putting forth legislation that will decriminalize marijuana.

Does the government really believe this is the right direction for the youth of our country?

JusticeOral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Mount Royal Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the hon. member's question. We are concerned with the youth of the country. Therefore, we propose legislation for the purposes of decriminalizing a younger generation, but making the point that marijuana use remains illegal and will continue to be illegal. We have done this with the drug education program warning about the hazards of marijuana use, and now with toughened legislation with regard to the control of marijuana.

Public SafetyOral Question Period

November 26th, 2004 / 11:40 a.m.

Conservative

James Bezan Conservative Selkirk—Interlake, MB

Mr. Speaker, this month a man was beaten to death with a 2x4 outside a townhouse in a city in my riding. Two of the offenders were in parole violation, and one of these parolees has just been charged with rape and incest.

The government continues to allow violent and dangerous offenders out of prison and back on our streets without rehabilitation or monitoring.

How can the government claim to be protecting public safety, when it cannot keep tabs on its violent offenders? When will the Liberals put an end to the revolving doors in our prisons?

Public SafetyOral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Edmonton Centre Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, first, we have a corrections and parole system that is one of the best in the world. However, I have indicated that I am willing to undertake a review of aspects of our parole system. The parole board may need more resources to do its job. I am more than willing to have the justice committee of the House of Commons take a look at this issue.

I have been very clear that our goal is public safety. If the system is not maximizing our commitment to public safety--

Public SafetyOral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Madawaska—Restigouche.

Foreign AffairsOral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Jean-Claude D'Amours Liberal Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

At the Francophonie summit, the Prime Minister referred to the responsibility to protect. What is the Government of Canada doing to promote this concept?

Foreign AffairsOral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as my hon. colleagues know, “The Responsibility to Protect” is the title of the final report of an expert panel struck by Canada to study the issue of humanitarian response.

Our objective is to ensure that the international community has both the tools and the will to respond to future tragedies such as the ones in Darfur and Rwanda. Our efforts are starting to pay off. Now, we are hoping that the United Nations will adopt the principles as its own. The Prime Minister, our officials and I are striving to achieve the necessary consensus on this objective in support of the responsibility to protect.

Softwood LumberOral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen NDP Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, next week Canada's Prime Minister has a chance to do right by Canadians.

Small communities in my riding have been desperately waiting for years now for the U.S. to lift its illegal tariff on softwood lumber. The courts have ruled, and industry knows it is coming. What is the government waiting for?

Will the Minister of Industry advise me on what to say to the families in my communities who are losing their homes because of Liberal inaction? Will he commit to go to the wall for them and demand that the Americans drop these tariffs and return 100% of the money they have illegally taken from British Columbians?

Softwood LumberOral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of International Trade has continued a wide strategy over softwood lumber, which is paying off for Canadians. We absolutely want to resolve the softwood lumber dispute that we have had with the United States for a long time. It is clear that the Prime Minister will raise it next week when the President visits us. I certainly have the intention of raising it with Secretary of State Colin Powell as well.

We will continue to fight for the softwood lumber producers of British Columbia, Quebec, Ontario, Alberta, producers across the country.

Textile and Clothing IndustryOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Pat Martin NDP Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, there are 43 garment manufacturers in my riding who want to keep their jobs in Canada, but they will close their doors if the Minister of Finance does not sign the duty remission orders which are sitting on his desk right now. Two separate unanimous reports from the finance committee directed him to sign these duty remission orders, as well as the Senate committee on banking.

Will the Minister of Finance sign these duty remission papers before they expire on December 31 and save thousands of Canadian jobs all over Canada and Quebec?

Textile and Clothing IndustryOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I am fully aware of the timing considerations involved in this matter. I have received numerous representations from all aspects of the textile and apparel industry in Canada. I have received particularly strong representations from members of the government caucus who are extremely concerned about this situation. Obviously, decisions have to be made before the end of the year, and they will be.

Coast GuardOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Gord Brown Conservative Leeds—Grenville, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the revenue minister.

On October 5 the minister stated that no jobs would be lost or services cut while the government finds a 5% savings in all departments. While this search for savings can be lauded, how does the minister justify recent and pending layoffs at the Coast Guard in the north and in Prescott, which will leave people out of work and vessels with no emergency coverage in Canada's Arctic?

Coast GuardOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the expenditure review process of the government is not about cutting. The process is about reallocation. It is about looking at everything the Government of Canada does in a fresh and reinvigorating way to ensure that we are relevant, that we are excellent and that we address the priorities of this century, not just the priorities of the last century.

TaxationOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

David Anderson Conservative Cypress Hills—Grasslands, SK

Mr. Speaker, in 2002 the Canada Revenue Agency skated into Saskatchewan. It was there to audit and to tax unpaid amateur hockey players on the money that was being paid to billets to feed and water the players. The Liberals ended up in the penalty box when a fight broke out. They stopped the audits, but they will not change the policy. I have introduced a private member's bill to correct this injustice.

My question is for the finance minister. Will he move ahead of my bill? Will he immediately move to amend the Income Tax Act to protect Saskatchewan junior hockey players and amateur athletes across Canada?

TaxationOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the hon. gentleman will know that this issue arose as the result of a complaint by a junior hockey player with respect to his particular rights and interests. That has led to a number of investigations and inquiries.

Two things are particularly important: first, that the law be applied with absolute precision and equity everywhere in the country, with no favouritism and no discrimination anywhere; and second, that we be prepared to review the law to ensure that it is in tune with the times.

The hon. gentleman has tabled a bill. I will be interested to see what it says.

Canada-U.S. RelationsOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Merv Tweed Conservative Brandon—Souris, MB

Mr. Speaker, the posters are up and graffiti is appearing on the streets in Ottawa. No, it is not a festival, but a planned demonstration on the visit of U.S. President George W. Bush to Ottawa. The slogan of the demonstration is, “When Bush comes to shove“. I am concerned this may be a call to violence.

Will the minister guarantee today the safety of all visiting dignitaries, Canadians and property, both public and private?

Canada-U.S. RelationsOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Edmonton Centre Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, the security of visitors to our country is a matter of key importance to all of us. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police is working with the city of Ottawa police, DND and the OPP to ensure that President Bush and his party will be safe and secure while they are visiting our nation's capital.

We obviously are a nation that values freedom of expression. I would--

Canada-U.S. RelationsOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Edmonton--Leduc.

Music IndustryOral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

James Rajotte Conservative Edmonton—Leduc, AB

Mr. Speaker, in 1996 the government signed the World Intellectual Property Organization treaty. The treaty was necessary to update our copyright laws to ensure that our artists such as Tom Cochrane, Amy Sky and Blue Rodeo received fair compensation for the music they create.

The Conservative Party supports amending our copyright laws to be in accordance with international standards.

Why has the government failed for six years to ratify the treaty? Does the government not realize that because of its delays and lack of leadership, it is putting at risk millions of dollars for the music industry and putting at risk the works that our artists, like Tom Cochrane, create for Canada?

Music IndustryOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Jeanne-Le Ber Québec

Liberal

Liza Frulla LiberalMinister of Canadian Heritage and Minister responsible for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, we have also met with members of the music industry. The whole copyright issue is indeed a critical one. We are currently drafting a copyright bill with the Minister of Industry. We intend to submit it to cabinet before Christmas, so that it can be referred to a committee during the next session.

Aerospace IndustryOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Robert Carrier Bloc Alfred-Pellan, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Transport, who is never short on demagogic rhetoric, claims that returning 11,000 acres of land to Mirabel farmers would jeopardize Bombardier's development. This is false. Bombardier has enough space to build its new aircraft in Mirabel, if it so wishes.

The real threat to Bombardier is a lack of federal assistance to help it develop its new aircraft in Quebec. What is the Minister of Industry waiting for to act?

Aerospace IndustryOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Winnipeg South Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock LiberalPresident of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. member would know, these lands are part of the ground lease with Aéroports de Montréal. The minister has consulted with it. They have looked at the future needs of the airport and they have made a decision. That decision has been conveyed.

Aerospace IndustryOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Robert Carrier Bloc Alfred-Pellan, QC

Mr. Speaker, Bombardier has enough space to develop its operations in Quebec. The company is only using one third of the 104 acres that it is currently leasing in Mirabel. Moreover, an adjacent lot of 222 acres is also available. What is not available though is a federal contribution to the development, in Quebec, of Bombardier's new aircraft.

What is the minister waiting for to announce his intentions and thus ensure the creation of 5,000 jobs in Quebec?

Aerospace IndustryOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Kings—Hants Nova Scotia

Liberal

Scott Brison LiberalMinister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada is committed to Bombardier as it is committed to our nationwide aerospace industry, which employs 80,000 Canadians.

I can assure the hon. member that the long-standing commitment of the Government of Canada will continue to grow as Canada's aerospace industry continues to be a leader in the world.