This week, I changed much of the tech behind this site. If you see anything that looks like a bug, please let me know!

House of Commons Hansard #63 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

AgricultureOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka Ontario

Liberal

Andy Mitchell LiberalMinister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, that is utter nonsense. The agricultural secretary of the United States has said that the basis upon which the border will be open is one that will be based on science. We have made it clear that the science indicates that the border should be open and in that respect, the USDA put forward a rule that would in fact allow for the export of live cattle under 30 months to the United States.

AgricultureOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Diane Finley Conservative Haldimand—Norfolk, ON

Mr. Speaker, what kind of help can Canadian producers expect from a government with a schizophrenic attitude toward the United States? There is no guarantee that the border will be reopened to our cattle. Once again, the Prime Minister is showing his inability to make a decision and stick to it.

Is the Prime Minister deliberately deciding to sacrifice our farmers, or is his government merely incompetent?

AgricultureOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka Ontario

Liberal

Andy Mitchell LiberalMinister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, what Canadian producers can expect is record payments in support, $4.8 billion. What producers can expect is a repositioning strategy of set aside programs that in fact increase the price of both feeder and fed cattle substantially in this country. What is happening is that our producers once again are beginning to get from the marketplace a good return on their products. We have more to do and we are determined to do it.

Aboriginal AffairsOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Cleary Bloc Louis-Saint-Laurent, QC

Mr. Speaker, the program to compensate victims of Indian residential school abuse is a disgrace. We have learned that for every $35 the federal government invests in alternative dispute resolution under this program, only $1 goes to the victims.

Can the Deputy Prime Minister explain why so little money goes to the residential school victims?

Aboriginal AffairsOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton Centre Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, as I explained yesterday, when I appeared before committee at which the hon. member was present, the vast majority of the dollars committed by the government to the tragedy of Indian residential schools will go directly to the victims. In fact, we created an ADR process so victims do not have to be re-victimized by the court process.

I certainly look forward to working with the committee, the AFN, the claimants and their lawyers to see if we can expedite this process.

Aboriginal AffairsOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Cleary Bloc Louis-Saint-Laurent, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Deputy Prime Minister is trying to defend the indefensible. Of the 1,200 applications for alternative dispute resolution since 2003, 27 have been settled so far.

Does the minister recognize that the survivors are getting older and that delay simply heightens the injustice these victims have already suffered?

Aboriginal AffairsOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton Centre Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, we are very conscious of and sensitive to the fact that delays in the situation of Indian residential school victims are inappropriate. That is why we have put in place an ADR process. That is why I am working with the AFN and others to ensure that we expedite this process.

I do not want delays in this process. I am fully aware of the trauma that claimants are facing. Therefore, my goal is to expedite this process by working with the claimants, their lawyers and other interested stakeholders.

Child PornographyOral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Myron Thompson Conservative Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, as the Minister of Justice well knows, there has been a public outcry to take a tough stand on child pornography. It is asking for zero tolerance.

Would the minister listen to the public's plea and at least provide a mandatory minimum sentence of two years for child pornography violators?

Child PornographyOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Mount Royal Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the whole purpose of our legislation is to protect against the evil of child pornography. The nature of mandatory minimums, as experience and research studies have shown, will secure the exact opposite of what the member on the other side wants and what we wish.

Aboriginal AffairsOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Jim Prentice Conservative Calgary North Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, why is the Deputy Prime Minister of this government so incapable of managing the residential school abuse file? Some 20 years ago a Conservative government settled 65% of all of the Japanese internment claims within one year and the entire program was completed within five years.

The Deputy Prime Minister has been responsible for this program for a year and a half. She has spent $125 million on bureaucracy. She has settled less than 3% of the possible claims. When is she going to abandon this disastrous program?

Aboriginal AffairsOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Edmonton Centre Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. member knows from my appearance at committee yesterday, I suppose it is fair to say I admonished him for throwing around numbers that are completely inaccurate. I will do the same thing today. Let me again inform the House that we have just over 13,000 claims. Just over 2,000 of those have been settled. We receive on average 17 new applications every week for the ADR process.

In fact, I have said and I will say again that whatever we can do that is sensible to expedite this process, I will do.

Aerospace IndustryOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Liberal Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Transport. Yesterday the minister went to Mirabel with the Premier of Quebec to announce a project worth $725.6 million at Bell Helicopter.

Can the minister tell us what the federal government's role was in this announcement and exactly what the announcement means to the Mirabel region?

Aerospace IndustryOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Outremont Québec

Liberal

Jean Lapierre LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to tell the House that yesterday's announcement confirmed the creation of 600 jobs at Mirabel, with an average salary of $60,000, in the aerospace industry in Quebec. It was made possible through the technology partnerships Canada program, which the Conservatives wanted to abolish during the last election campaign. We are talking about $115 million in repayable loans from the federal government and $115 million from the province. Everyone is a winner: the employees, Quebec and Canada.

National RevenueOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Cheryl Gallant Conservative Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Mr. Speaker, there is a need to support the families who have children with a disability. The minister's own advisory panel recommended that he stop forcing parents to remit payroll deductions on tax free grants when they are used to engage caregivers.

Why is the Minister of National Revenue continuing to harass the families of children who have disabilities?

National RevenueOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Markham—Unionville Ontario

Liberal

John McCallum LiberalMinister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, the government is not harassing such people. The government has measures in place and more measures may be on the way. The issue in terms of tax collection is that the law has to be obeyed. There are certain tax laws in place and the agency is simply obeying those laws.

Human ResourcesOral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Conservative Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, this Liberal government does not consider siblings to be part of a family. A 43 year old Langley woman is dying. Her sister has left her home and job to care for the sister but has been denied compassionate care benefits. We gave the Minister of Human Resources a chance to do the right thing but she refused. It is shameful.

Before it is too late, will the Prime Minister do the right thing? Will he stop dithering, help keep families together and provide compassionate care for siblings?

Human ResourcesOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard LiberalPresident of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada

Mr. Speaker, I think we have to be proud that our government put forward this compassionate care leave for the people in our society. I think it was the first time it had been done in our country. We do believe that after one year of experience it is time to evaluate the program and perhaps bring about some improvements.

Pay EquityOral Question Period

February 23rd, 2005 / 3 p.m.

Bloc

Paule Brunelle Bloc Trois-Rivières, QC

Mr. Speaker, women who work full time still earn 71% of what men do. This gap is even wider if the woman is aboriginal, from an ethnocultural community or disabled. In June 2001, the government set up a pay equity working group co-chaired by the Ministers of Justice and Labour.

When does the government intend to implement the recommendations of the working group, which submitted its report in May 2004?

Pay EquityOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Jeanne-Le Ber Québec

Liberal

Liza Frulla LiberalMinister of Canadian Heritage and Minister responsible for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, obviously the status of women is something that is very important to us. We are currently working on implementing the report on pay equity. Furthermore, we also have a gender analysis that even helped shape today's budget, which is a first.

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Liberal

Lui Temelkovski Liberal Oak Ridges—Markham, ON

Mr. Speaker, last week we heard from the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration in regard to the 2,000 Vietnamese boat people who remain in the Philippines.

I know that he mentioned the difficulties involved in remedying this situation, but given the role that Canada plays in welcoming refugees and the great contribution the Vietnamese Canadian community has made to this country, surely something can be done. Just what is the government prepared to do?

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence Ontario

Liberal

Joe Volpe LiberalMinister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for his ongoing concern. He and members of the Liberal caucus have done their utmost to make sure that this issue has stayed front and centre.

I am pleased to announce that what the Government of Canada will do is join three other countries in ensuring that these individuals and families who are currently stateless will have the opportunity to join siblings and others who will sponsor them here from Canada. Provided that they pass the usual security clearances, we will have an opportunity to accommodate them together with their families and those who sponsor them from within the Canadian community.

Deportation of AcadiansOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Bloc Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, this year is the 250th anniversary of the beginning of the Acadian deportation. The Queen will find the time to visit Saskatchewan and Alberta to mark the 100th anniversary of their entry into the Canadian federation, but she will not have the time to go to Acadia. Given the British Crown's heavy responsibility in these tragic events, an apology seems only natural.

Does the Minister of Canadian Heritage intend to intervene again with the Queen in order to specifically ask that she go to Acadia to do what needs to be done with regard to the Acadian people?

Deportation of AcadiansOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Jeanne-Le Ber Québec

Liberal

Liza Frulla LiberalMinister of Canadian Heritage and Minister responsible for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, I think that we have done what needed to be done, particularly to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Acadia. It is important to understand that even if I wanted to, I do not control the Queen's agenda. If Buckingham Palace says no, unfortunately, my authority does not extend to England.

IndustryOral Question Period

3 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus NDP Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Industry has never come across a Canadian job he did not think would be better done overseas.

Meanwhile, the Chinese government continues with its plans to buy up the mines and smelters of Noranda Falconbridge and this Liberal government has no plan for the fact that the Chinese government is nationalizing our resources.

What steps has the Minister of Industry put in place to ensure that the interests of the mining towns in northern Canada are protected if this Minmetals deal goes through?

IndustryOral Question Period

3 p.m.

Vancouver Kingsway B.C.

Liberal

David Emerson LiberalMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, under the Investment Canada Act we will review such a transaction and we will ensure that undertakings are in place to protect workers and to protect Canadian interests.