This week, I changed much of the tech behind this site. If you see anything that looks like a bug, please let me know!

House of Commons Hansard #118 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was salmon.

Topics

Border CrossingsOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

France Bonsant Bloc Compton—Stanstead, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Standing Committee on Industry, Natural Resources, Science and Technology yesterday passed a resolution inviting the ministers of international trade and of public security and emergency preparedness to explain Canada's choice to not be part of the work to improve the Lacolle border facilities, as the Americans are doing on their side.

Is the government aware that, if the work is not done, the Lacolle border crossing, Canada's fourth largest, could become an impenetrable wall?

Border CrossingsOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Edmonton Centre Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, we regularly assess our needs at all major border crossings, both the infrastructure needs and the human resource needs. I am very well aware of the importance of the Lacolle crossing.

The Canada Border Services Agency will ensure that whatever infrastructure is required to facilitate the movement of low risk goods and people across that border crossing is in place. I can reassure the hon. member of that fact.

Border CrossingsOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

France Bonsant Bloc Compton—Stanstead, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is all very well for the government to contend it has spent significant amounts to improve Canada's border crossings, but witnesses tell me in committee that this does not apply to the Lacolle crossing.

Why is the government not investing the funds needed to make Lacolle as efficient a border crossing as the one on the American side?

Border CrossingsOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Edmonton Centre Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, as I say, we regularly assess the infrastructure and human resource requirements of our major border crossings. We do this on a regular basis and we make the investments necessary to ensure that low risk goods and people cross our border in a timely fashion.

I can again reassure the hon. member that the CBSA is very much aware of the situation on the ground in Lacolle. We are very much aware of what is happening on the U.S. side of the border. The CBSA will do everything that is necessary to ensure that our side of the border facilitates the movement of goods and people.

Tsunami ReliefOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Nina Grewal Conservative Fleetwood—Port Kells, BC

Mr. Speaker, both Norway and France have delivered on over 80% of their tsunami aid pledges. Canada has not delivered half that amount. The Prime Minister promised to “verify that Canadian aid is getting through to parts of Sri Lanka controlled by Tamil rebels”. He said, “This is something we are going to monitor and we'll insist it be monitored on a continuous basis”.

Why has the government not fulfilled its promise that Canadian aid dollars would reach those in need?

Tsunami ReliefOral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Barrie Ontario

Liberal

Aileen Carroll LiberalMinister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, let me assure the House that the Prime Minister's commitment is being undertaken very faithfully by me. I am in regular communication with my counterpart in Sri Lanka, as well as Indonesia and other tsunami impacted countries.

We have disbursed a very large amount of the moneys to go toward the reconstruction and the plans we have for those areas of Sri Lanka. Sixty per cent of that area is in the northeast and our communications and our rollout are exceptional.

Tsunami ReliefOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Nina Grewal Conservative Fleetwood—Port Kells, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Sri Lankan government's main ally quit the ruling coalition. His move was over plans to share tsunami aid with survivors in the Tamil controlled northern regions. The Sri Lankan government has now been reduced to a hamstrung minority.

With the Sri Lankan government in chaos, how can the minister ensure the equitable distribution of Canadian aid money?

Tsunami ReliefOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Barrie Ontario

Liberal

Aileen Carroll LiberalMinister of International Cooperation

Indeed, Mr. Speaker, there has been some concern expressed by members of the coalition--

Tsunami ReliefOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

An hon. member

Answer the question.

Tsunami ReliefOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Aileen Carroll Liberal Barrie, ON

I am attempting to do that, Mr. Speaker. We are in constant communication with our authorities on the ground with regard to recent events and the joint mechanism withdrawal of some parts of the Sri Lankan government.

I do not require the kind of apparatus that is being suggested by the member. We are working through the United Nations. We are working with NGOs. Our aid is being disbursed. My CIDA people are on the ground. I can assure the House and Canada of a very effective reconstruction program in that area of Sri Lanka.

FisheriesOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Jean-Claude D'Amours Liberal Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, as you know, the Restigouche region in the riding of Madawaska—Restigouche is considered one of the best salmon-fishing areas in the world. Atlantic salmon is obviously very important to the region's economy.

Could the minister tell us the impact of the Atlantic salmon endowment fund, announced in the 2005 budget?

FisheriesOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Charlottetown P.E.I.

Liberal

Shawn Murphy LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

First, Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for his hard and tireless work on this particular issue. This work has paid off. In the last budget, the Minister of Finance allocated $30 million for the establishment of the Atlantic Canada salmon endowment fund. This will go to habitat improvement, stock enhancement, monitoring and conservation. The fund and the governing structure are in the process of being established.

Softwood LumberOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

John Duncan Conservative Vancouver Island North, BC

Mr. Speaker, the U.S. lumber lobby is continuing to cost the Canadian industry millions in legal fees by filing new legal challenges at every level with the support of their government. The Americans are trying to squeeze out the Canadian industry.

The Canadian industry asked the Canadian government to defray its legal costs. The minister then announced $20 million in April, but has failed to deliver. It is the same old story with these Liberals: promises made, promises broken. When can the Canadian industry expect delivery on this promise?

Softwood LumberOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Winnipeg South Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock LiberalPresident of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, there have been few ministers of agriculture in the history of this country who have done as much for producers at a difficult time as this minister has. I do not need to go through the list of all of the investments he has made. He takes this very seriously. He is seized of it. He is working, not with an opposition that will not work with him, but with producers, to reach solutions.

Softwood LumberOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

John Duncan Conservative Vancouver Island North, BC

Mr. Speaker, this has nothing to do with the agriculture minister. This has to with the trade minister.

The minister wants to cut a deal prior to the NAFTA extraordinary challenge decision expected in August, but he does not have industry consensus. Is it not true that the minister is trying to starve the industry to accept a deal that is not in Canada's best interests?

It is widely expected by all parties that Canada will win the NAFTA final appeal decision, confirming that our lumber exports do not constitute a threat to U.S. industry. Is it not true that the minister's lack of support for the industry is an attempt to--

Softwood LumberOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. President of the Treasury Board.

Softwood LumberOral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Winnipeg South Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock LiberalPresident of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I am in fact four ministers today, but given the nature of that last question, if I may on behalf of the minister of trade, I would give the same answer.

Democratic Republic of the CongoOral Question Period

June 17th, 2005 / 11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Roger Clavet Bloc Louis-Hébert, QC

Mr. Speaker, according to a documentary on Australian television, a Canadian company in Congo-Kinshasa, Anvil Mining, played an active role in the massacre of over a hundred civilians by the Congolese army.

Does the government intend to follow up on the call by a group of NGOs to investigate Anvil's role and responsibility in this tragedy, as required by resolution 1596 adopted by the UN Security Council?

Democratic Republic of the CongoOral Question Period

Noon

Barrie Ontario

Liberal

Aileen Carroll LiberalMinister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, Canada wants lasting peace in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, for the welfare of all the Congolese.

I am not sure I am able to answer the member's concerns and, specifically, his question. However, I will speak to my colleague, and I assure the member that an answer will be forthcoming.

Public ServiceOral Question Period

Noon

Liberal

Wajid Khan Liberal Mississauga—Streetsville, ON

Mr. Speaker, it has become all too common in the House for the official opposition to portray the hard-working men and women of our public service as inefficient and ineffective. Given that this week is set aside to celebrate the fine work being done by the members of our public service, would the President of the Treasury Board please take this opportunity to, on behalf of the government, thank them for the important work they do for Canadians?

Public ServiceOral Question Period

Noon

Winnipeg South Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock LiberalPresident of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I think I can speak on behalf of all members of the House on this particular issue. The Government of Canada is the largest organizational entity in this country. Our direct spending drives a third of this economy. We have the largest labour force in this country. We have the most complex organization. A large organization like B.C. might have 11 lines of business. We have 463.

Our programs are the foundation upon which the quality of life of Canadians is built and they are delivered by the public service of Canada.

The BudgetOral Question Period

Noon

Conservative

Loyola Hearn Conservative St. John's South, NL

Mr. Speaker, Bill C-43, including the Atlantic accord provisions, has now gone through all stages in the House and on to the Senate, where we are guaranteed, at least by Conservative senators, that it will receive speedy passage.

Let me ask the minister this. When can the province of Newfoundland and Labrador expect to get its cheque and will we be paid the $40 million in interest we have lost since the signing of the agreement in February?

The BudgetOral Question Period

Noon

Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the government is glad to see Bill C-43 complete its passage through the House of Commons. It is now of course in the other place and we too hope that the Senate will be able to deal with this matter on a very expeditious basis so that the cash can begin to flow.

I only regret that the opposition delayed it so long. This could have been done in March.

National DefenceOral Question Period

Noon

Bloc

Guy Côté Bloc Portneuf, QC

Mr. Speaker, the attitude of the Minister of National Defence is deplorable. While the people of Shannon are justifiably worried about the health effects of contaminated water, the minister is keeping a preliminary report on the extent of that contamination secret.

Can the minister understand that the people of Shannon consider access to the preliminary report at least as important, if not more so, than the solely material contributions the minister wants to restrict his role to? Will the minister release this report?

National DefenceOral Question Period

Noon

Toronto Centre Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham LiberalMinister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, as I said yesterday, and the day before, we have spent more than $30 million to support the people of Shannon by providing homes with safe drinking water.

What is more, we are sharing all raw data with the municipality, the province of Quebec and the owners of the land where tests have been carried out. There is no report. What there is, which we are sharing with the public, is the raw data on all the testing. We will continue to cooperate with the citizens, the municipality and the province.