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House of Commons Hansard #33 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was harbour.

Topics

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam B.C.

Conservative

James Moore ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, I love my colleague’s conspiracy theories. However, as I already told our hon. colleague from the NDP, neither the Minister of Public Works and Government Services—Mr. Fortier—nor I have ever met Mr. Doucet in regard to this project.

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Liberal Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, for a purchase of $30 million, a $600 million lease without public tenders and without public bids is a very nice deal, thanks.

Following the terrorism plot of which we are now aware, is it really a good idea to centralize the RCMP under one roof, 20 kilometres away from Parliament Hill, far away from embassies and far away from the government buildings that could be targeted by terrorists? Really?

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam B.C.

Conservative

James Moore ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, if the member for Hull—Aylmer does not like the process that has been undertaken, his government in fact initiated the process. It is the same process that was used to get the Department of Foreign Affairs the current residents it is using. It is the same process that was used to get the Food Inspection Agency the office space it is using.

In fact, if the member opposite has any problems with it whatsoever, he can go ahead and look in the mirror. However, if he does believe in accountability, we look forward to his support for the federal accountability act. We look forward to him standing by the RCMP and ensuring it gets the best office possible.

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Marc Lemay Bloc Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, representatives of indigenous peoples and governments around the world have been working for over 20 years to have the draft United Nations declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples adopted. The Canadian delegation, which is in favour of adopting the declaration, worked from 2004 to date with Canada's first nations.

Will the Prime Minister confirm that the Canadian delegation will vote in favour of the draft declaration, without amendment, at the upcoming working session of the Human Rights Council?

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice ConservativeMinister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the hon. member's question.

We feel that the negotiating process at the United Nations has already proven extremely useful in creating trust between member nations and indigenous peoples throughout the world.

The proposed draft declaration is a very complex document. There are many different opinions in the other countries. I am talking with the other ministers about this.

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Marc Lemay Bloc Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, we want a clear answer.

Will the Prime Minister tell us unequivocally that Canada will live up to its reputation and vote in favour of full respect for the rights of indigenous peoples, unlike Australia, New Zealand and the United States, which are trying to delay adoption of this declaration?

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice ConservativeMinister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, as I have previously stated, the subject is a complicated one. We believe that the process of negotiations to this point at the United Nations have been constructive and that they are aiding in the reconciliation of aboriginal interests and the interests of states in the world.

The draft declaration, which has been proposed, is a complex one. There are many differing points of view in the world on this subject. We will continue to work together with the United Nations and our other partners as we move forward.

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Lloyd St. Amand Liberal Brant, ON

Mr. Speaker, it has been over three months since the protests in Caledonia began and I have heard from hundreds of people, the citizens of Caledonia, whose lives have been completely disrupted.

I have also heard from aboriginal Canadians who are extremely disappointed that their issues are not one of the government's five priorities. The unwillingness of the government to commit to the Kelowna accord compounds their disappointment.

When will the government listen to Justice Marshall, to the citizens of Caledonia and to aboriginals and take not simply a spectator role but a leadership role in solving the dispute?

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice ConservativeMinister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member and I have spoken in the past. He knows full well that the federal Crown has been involved in these negotiations. The constitutional reality in our country is that the federal Crown is not responsible for policing issues nor for issues relating to provincial Crown land.

However, we are involved in the land claims process and so the record is clear, since the issue in Caledonia began, at various times the federal Crown has sent in Mr. Bob Howsam, one of the senior people from my department, Michael Coyle, one of Ontario's most respected academics, Ron Doering, one of the country's most able negotiators, and most recent, a respected former parliamentarian and a former foreign affairs minister, Barbara McDougall. We are doing everything we can and we continue to make progress.

Stanley CupOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Mike Lake Conservative Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont, AB

Mr. Speaker, tonight the Edmonton Oilers will be playing in Carolina in the opening game of the Stanley Cup championship series.

This is the first time since 1990 that the Oilers have made the finals. Since 1993, when the Liberals came into office, no Canadian team has won the cup.

We can see the change in government is already having an impact.

Could the Prime Minister tell us if the government has any position on the Stanley Cup finals?

Stanley CupOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

I am not convinced that even if the government had a position it would be something that is within the administrative responsibility of a government which questions are supposed to deal with.

We will hear from the Prime Minister very briefly.

Stanley CupOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper ConservativePrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I want to observe that every step of the way the Edmonton Oilers have overcome injury and adversity to go from eighth place to the finals. They defeated the president's trophy winner, the Detroit Red Wings. They battled back against the San José Sharks and the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, If they continue to play the game they are capable of playing, they will bring the Stanley Cup back to Canada where it rightfully belongs.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

June 5th, 2006 / 2:55 p.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen NDP Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

For two minutes, Mr. Speaker, what cheap pandering to the crowds.

This weekend, at a conference representing over 1,300 cities and communities from across Canada, the Minister of the Environment may have made her best speech yet by not showing up at all. It was bad enough that she only spent 24 hours at a two week international climate change conference on which she was the president, now we see that she could not even bother to take the two hour train trip to Montreal and address Canada's mayors.

Did she get cold feet from being protested, as she was in her home town of Edmonton two weeks ago, or did she simply have nothing to say on the topic? Which is it?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeMinister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, speaking of the member for Skeena—Bulkley Valley and his personal agenda and conferences, he is the environment critic for the NDP who was hosted by the Canadian delegation in Bonn. They made him feel comfortable and gave him all the information he needed. He spent a day there, flew back to Canada and then held a press conference where he told Canadians that, “All I did there was fight with Environment Canada officials”.

I would like to ask him what he accomplished at the conference.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen NDP Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, the minister might be a little confused about how question period actually works.

I spent three days at the Bonn conference and for three days I was embarrassed by the position taken by Canada. It was a defeatist attitude and negated all our international commitments.

While the minister refused to show enough respect to Canada's mayors by simply engaging them in Montreal this weekend, she has to realize that the mayors and councillors of this country have committed, not only to the Kyoto targets, but to push beyond a position opposite to her government.

Since the minister does not believe in the necessity or even the possibility of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, will she simply provide the mayors with the funding to do it themselves?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeMinister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, he is back on his personal agenda. I would advise him that maybe he might take a lesson from a more constructive NDPer, the premier of Manitoba, Gary Doer, who is working very constructively with this government. He says that this national government wants a made in Canada plan on climate change. We are saying that we are ready, willing and able to work on tangible plans to make a difference for Canada.

Federal Accountability ActOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Liberal Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Justice has a legal duty to certify that his government bills do not violate Canada's Constitution. In the expert legal opinion of our parliamentary law clerk, his government's accountability bill is unconstitutional.

Will the Minister of Justice take responsibility for Bill C-2 and make public the legal opinions that justified his certifying that bill, or is his problem that those opinions also concluded that his government's accountability bill is unconstitutional?

Federal Accountability ActOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Provencher Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews ConservativeMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I have read the legal opinion and it says that it is not unconstitutional to enact legislation that limits the constitutional privileges of the House.

As for tabling it, it is the law clerk's opinion.

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Joy Smith Conservative Kildonan—St. Paul, MB

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals claimed that when it came to infrastructure funding their way was the only way and yet the Federation of Canadian Municipalities has praised the Conservative government's approach to infrastructure and cities.

Could the Minister of Transport update the House on the Conservative government's approach and the response from the Federation of Canadian Municipalities?

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Pontiac Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon ConservativeMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, everyone knows that the Prime Minister addressed the Federation of Canadian Municipalities last Friday and told them how this government was delivering on its commitments for cities and communities across the country, such as budget 2006, where there is an unprecedented amount of $16.5 billion that will go to Canadians and the municipalities that we represent.

The response by the president of the federation was that these were solid gains for Canadians and municipalities and thanked us very much for our excellent work.

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Jean Crowder NDP Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, the barricades in Caledonia are still up because the residents of Six Nations feel the federal government is not fulfilling its responsibility. The minister must prove his leadership on first nations issues.

When the minister presents the draft UN declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples to cabinet will he recommend that Canada adopt the declaration?

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice ConservativeMinister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, I believe I addressed that question previously today, but in case the hon. member did not hear me, this is a complicated subject. It is before the government. We believe the process of negotiations at the United Nations has been a constructive one. We will continue to analyze the document that has been produced and in the days ahead we will speak about it.

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Maria Mourani Bloc Ahuntsic, QC

Mr. Speaker, tensions are high between Syria and Lebanon. Nevertheless, Lebanese people who wish to emigrate to Canada must go to the Canadian embassy in Damascus, Syria, to apply. These people and their families have good reason to be worried.

Does the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration intend to offer immigration services at his embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, so that Lebanese people applying for permanent residency can do so there? The embassy exists. What is the minister waiting for?

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

3 p.m.

Medicine Hat Alberta

Conservative

Monte Solberg ConservativeMinister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, a number of people have approached me and the department about this issue. I know many people are concerned about making that journey to Damascus and, in fact, we are constantly reviewing our policies in this regard.

Presence in GalleryOral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

I wish to draw the attention of members to the presence in our gallery of His Excellency Foued Mabazaâ, Speaker of the Chamber of Deputies of the Tunisian Republic, and his delegation.