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House of Commons Hansard #111 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was report.

Topics

National SecurityOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

York—Simcoe Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan ConservativeLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, I do not think we need those legislative hearings now because he covered everything that they were going to say in them.

The reality is, dealing with just one of the many things he suggested there, Ms. Couillard is not a candidate and has never been a candidate for the Conservative Party. She is not even a member of the Conservative Party.

National SecurityOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Liberal Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, I wonder if it is private or public interest here.

Let us cut to the chase here. There were security breaches. There was ample warning and yet the government ignored every clue it got.

Given her connections to organized crime and biker gangs, did the government ever wonder whose ambition Ms. Couillard was serving? First, foreign affairs and now public works. What is the Prime Minister waiting for? When will he call a full public inquiry?

National SecurityOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

York—Simcoe Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan ConservativeLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, the government is responding in an appropriate fashion to the matters that have been raised here. The Department of Foreign Affairs is conducting a review into the one matter of concern that is legitimate here and that was the question of classified documents being left in an unsecured place. We look forward to it completing that work.

CopyrightOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Bruce Stanton Conservative Simcoe North, ON

Mr. Speaker, we know that copyright reform in Canada is long overdue. Canadian consumers need to have reasonable use of the latest technologies without fear of infringing copyright law. Under the current laws, Canadians run the risk of being sued for the everyday use of the products and services that they buy.

Could the Minister of Industry confirm to the House that the bill he tabled today ensures that Canadian consumers will no longer be treated like criminals for the everyday use of things like time shifting their television programs or copying CD music to their iPods?

CopyrightOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice ConservativeMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, as has been promised previously, this bill seeks to strike a balance between consumers and their rights on the one hand, and on the other hand those who are creators in our society. It is an important bill.

I would point out that it has been well received. There is positive commentary that has been extensive at this point about the introduction of the bill. The Canadian Chamber of Commerce, the Entertainment Software Association of Canada, the Business Software Alliance, ACTRA, the Canadian Film and Television Production Association, the Canadian Publishers' Council, the Canadian Intellectual Property Council have all welcomed the introduction of the bill.

Omar KhadrOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Wayne Marston NDP Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadian Omar Khadr has been detained by U.S. officials for 2053 days. He has been interrogated countless times. The first charges did not stick, so the U.S. military created a new charge. His trial was cancelled, rescheduled, then the judge was replaced, all with evidence mounting that the United States simply is not telling the truth about the circumstances of Mr. Khadr's arrest.

I want an unequivocal answer from the government. Does it agree with the U.S. supreme court and others associated with the case that the Bush administration's Guantanamo Bay process is illegal?

Omar KhadrOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Calgary East Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, we do not comment on the judicial process of another country, but what is important to understand is that Mr. Khadr faces some very serious charges regarding terrorism.

The Government of Canada strongly believes that the fight against terrorism must be carried out in compliance with international law including the established standards of human rights and due process.

Omar KhadrOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Wayne Marston NDP Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, ON

That is repeated empty spin, Mr. Speaker.

Six French nationals were released by the U.S. to France in 2004 and 2005; British national Moazzam Begg was released in January 2005; Murat Kurnaz, a Turkish-German, was released in August, 2006; and Australian David Hicks was released in April, 2007. Omar Khadr is the only western detainee left. He must come home to Canada.

There are many recommendations on the way this can be done. The only question that remains is, when will the Prime Minister bring Omar Khadr home?

Omar KhadrOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Calgary East Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, as I have stated on numerous occasions, Mr. Khadr faces very serious charges in relation to his capture in Afghanistan. Any questions regarding Mr. Khadr's return to Canada are premature and speculative, as the legal process and appeals are still going on.

Omar KhadrOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Liberal Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, on this same point.

The United States supreme court today, in a five to four ruling, said clearly that habeas corpus applied in the United States and that the detention of several of the detainees in Guantanamo Bay did not meet the standards of the United States constitution.

It is a very simple question for the government today. Just what is it going to take for the government to understand that Omar Khadr should face justice in Canada and not in Guantanamo Bay? That is what should happen.

Omar KhadrOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Calgary East Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, we do not comment on any questions regarding another country's judicial process, but I would like to say to the former NDP leader of Ontario that he can ask his leader what was his government's policy because this policy was initiated when his leader was in the cabinet of the previous government.

Omar KhadrOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Liberal Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, today's decision by the U.S. Supreme Court is the court's third decision unequivocally stipulating that human rights must be respected. It is clear that Mr. Khadr's rights have been violated. He was 15 years old when he was arrested.

Now, we are sending a clear message to this government that Mr. Khadr must be tried under the Canadian justice system and Canadian laws, and not under an illegal procedure in the United States.

Omar KhadrOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Calgary East Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, Canada strongly believes that the fight against terrorism must be carried out in compliance with international law, including established standards of human rights and due process. That is the Government of Canada's position. Mr. Khadr faces very serious charges of terrorism.

However, let me just say the government is following the same policy that the previous government established in 2002.

Regional Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Liberal Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec has not convinced us that his decision to cut funding to not for profit organizations was well founded. Neither his provincial counterpart nor Quebec's business community were dazzled by the wisdom of his decision. Perhaps we are not addressing the right person. The minister told us that it was his cabinet colleagues who forced his hand.

Could the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, the Prime Minister's Quebec lieutenant, tell us which organizations will be affected in his region, which is also my region?

Regional Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn ConservativeMinister of Labour and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, as I said earlier, we have given $1.6 billion to the Government of Quebec over the past year. That is even more money in the pockets of the Government of Quebec and we were the ones to give it to them. Of that money, $242 million went to Quebec's Minister of Economic Development, Innovation and Export Trade. We took that money out of our own coffers in order to give it to the Government of Quebec, and now that government is criticizing us.

We will continue to support economic organizations, but we will focus on one-off projects that have a start, a middle and an end.

Regional Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Liberal Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is interesting to see that the Prime Minister's Quebec lieutenant is not defending his colleague who is responsible for economic development. It was the Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec himself who suggested that we address his cabinet colleagues. He said that they had forced his hand to cut his budget in half and abandon the not for profit economic organizations.

Can the Minister of Canadian Heritage, Status of Women and Official Languages, who is responsible for the beautiful Quebec City region, tell us what PÔLE Québec Chaudière-Appalaches did to deserve this?

Regional Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn ConservativeMinister of Labour and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, I heard all sorts of mistruths coming from the hon. member just now. I want to reiterate that we will continue to support economic organizations. They have a two-year transition period to get ready to fly on their own. What is more, if they have one-off projects, we will support them since that is what we want to do.

If the Government of Quebec, which shares this jurisdiction with us, wants to pay for other things, then it is free and has the full authority to do so.

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Christiane Gagnon Bloc Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, in August, the 2008 Congrès mondial des jeunes Régénération will be held as part of the 400th anniversary celebrations of Quebec City. It is considered to be the largest gathering of young people in the world. Of the 1,100 people invited, more than 700 need a visa, and already half of those who have applied have been turned down. However, the minister has had the list of participants for over a year and a half.

Will the minister responsible for the Quebec City region speak to her colleague, the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, to get these young people their visas?

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley ConservativeMinister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, as I told the hon. member's colleague last week, we are trying to help organizations get their delegates to these conventions. We want to ensure they are successful.

However, each application must receive all due attention in order to protect the people who are already here. If the hon. member has details about specific cases, I would be happy to help her.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Christiane Gagnon Bloc Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, also in the Quebec City region, the Valcartier base contaminated wells used by residents of Shannon. The tainted wells have simply been sealed, and the residents are getting their water from the water system at the Valcartier base.

The Minister of National Defence, who is responsible for this file, refuses to commit the $12 million needed to supply clean water. Can the minister offer some reassurance to these people and commit now to making the necessary investments?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton Centre Alberta

Conservative

Laurie Hawn ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, we have been working with the people of Shannon, the province of Quebec and the city of Quebec to make sure that clean water is available, not only for Valcartier but for the people of Shannon. There has been a great cooperative arrangement with Valcartier, Shannon, and Quebec.

We are investing everything we need to invest. We are going to continue to work with those bodies to make sure we get the job done in the future.

The EconomyOral Questions

June 12th, 2008 / 2:50 p.m.

Liberal

John McCallum Liberal Markham—Unionville, ON

Mr. Speaker, a new poll says the majority of Canadians expect a recession because the Conservatives have so mismanaged the economy. Their doubt in the government is well placed.

The IMF says it will lower Canada's growth forecast for the second time in less than three months. Factories are closing in Ontario, a place the finance minister says is the last place to invest.

Why are Tory times always tough times? Why are the Conservatives so disconnected from hard-working Canadians?

The EconomyOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Macleod Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, let me quote from another report of just yesterday.

The OECD recognized Canada's economic strengths, the opposite of what the hon. member is suggesting. It recognized that the direction our government is taking is the right one.

We are in an enviable position. Our economic fundamentals are strong. We have the best job market in a generation, but we certainly do not want to allow the Liberals to get back in place where they would put a punitive carbon tax on us and perhaps run us into a deficit position.

Child CareOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Mike Lake Conservative Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont, AB

Mr. Speaker, today the Canadian Labour Congress had the audacity to criticize the government for its refusal to support the NDP child care bill. That is puzzling since the NDP has refused to debate its own child care bill in the House seven times now knowing that it has zero support from provinces and very little support from parents.

Our government will not cave in to the paternalistic demands of the NDP and a small group of union leaders who believe that government is better at raising children than Canadian parents.

Can the human resources minister please tell the House what the Conservative government is doing to ensure parents have the options they need with respect to raising their own children?

Child CareOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Medicine Hat Alberta

Conservative

Monte Solberg ConservativeMinister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, I thank the very hard-working MP and someone who understands better than most the challenges of raising children.

Not only does the CLC have its facts wrong, its philosophy is a disaster. This year our government's child care transfers to the provinces will be almost double what they have reported, but when it comes to philosophy, the CLC, the NDP, the Bloc, and the Liberals dismiss the role of parents in raising children.

In fact, not only would the Liberal leader make gasoline and home heating fuel more expensive, he would take away the universal child care benefit from Canadian families for reasons that elude me.