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House of Commons Hansard #119 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was drugs.

Topics

Aerospace IndustryOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Daniel Paillé Bloc Hochelaga, QC

Mr. Speaker, our aeronautics companies are competing against international players that benefit from state support. A proper industrial policy would support research and development, sales and financing. Contrary to what the Minister of Finance believes, we need new measures.

Will the government introduce an emergency short-term plan to help Quebeckers?

Aerospace IndustryOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, as I just mentioned, the government has taken significant measures to ensure the long-term success and viability of our aerospace sector.

From a larger economic standpoint, commentators around the world have commented on the strength of the Canadian situation. Just a couple of months ago France's finance minister, coming out of the G20 finance ministers meeting, said, “I think we can be inspired by the Canadian situation”. There were some people who said, “I want to be Canadian”.

I just wish all members of the House felt the same way.

Olympic Winter GamesOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Liberal Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, there are 77 days before Vancouver's Olympic Games begin. We learned that the government has only now awarded its $9 million contract to build Canada's Olympic pavilion.

All of the provinces and territories are finished or close to finishing their pavilions, pavilions to showcase their regions to visitors, media, world leaders and potential investors, the marketing opportunity of the decade.

How can Canadians be getting the best possible Canada pavilion with only 77 days to design and build it?

Olympic Winter GamesOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

The hon. Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage.

Olympic Winter GamesOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Scott Brison Liberal Kings—Hants, NS

There's the pavilion.

Olympic Winter GamesOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Peterborough Ontario

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, the Canada pavilion is on track to be completed for the start of the games. It will celebrate everything that Canada has to offer, everything from our heritage and our culture, from first nations to settlers, everything that this country is all about.

It will be a celebration of Canada, our athletes, our country, and Canadians will be immensely proud of it.

Olympic Winter GamesOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Liberal Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, with the lateness of the bid process and given only two weeks to prepare a bid, people in the construction industry wondered if the government had a favoured company in mind, or if this was just pure incompetence.

Now we know the $9 million plum contract for Canada's pavilion has gone to an American company, creating American jobs. What a celebration of Canada that is.

At a time of record unemployment in Canada, will the minister tell us, were there no Canadian companies good enough to build Canada's pavilion?

Olympic Winter GamesOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Peterborough Ontario

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, one of the side benefits of hosting the Vancouver 2010 Olympics has been all the Canadian jobs that have been created in the lower mainland of British Columbia.

This government has been proud to support those 2010 Olympic Games. We have worked with Vanoc and we have worked with the province of British Columbia. This will be a celebration that all Canadians can take part in. The torch relay is going from coast to coast to coast in this country. Canadians are excited. I do not know why the member is not. I sure am.

Financial InstitutionsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Glenn Thibeault NDP Sudbury, ON

Mr. Speaker, now that the Minister of Finance has introduced his voluntary code of conduct for credit and debit cards, all that remains to be seen is whether it will have any impact and provide consumers and small businesses with a break from excessive fees.

Could the finance minister please tell Canadians, should Visa and MasterCard not voluntarily comply with this code, how many times must the code be violated for the minister to finally introduce concrete legislation and bring real relief to consumers and small business?

Financial InstitutionsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Macleod Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, indeed, the minister did put forward a code of conduct out in the public domain for consultation, for comments back in a 60-day period. However, we have already heard from businesses. We heard from businesses before about their concerns, and that is why we put in place a code of conduct.

Let me comment on the reaction from businesses. This is from the CFIB:

These developments will create a better future for merchants and help ensure a fair and transparent credit and debit market instead of just letting large industry players call all the shots.

Olympic Winter GamesOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen NDP London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, this February, at the Olympic Games, the Vancouver Police Department is expecting a surge in the number of women illegally trafficked into and across this country.

Resources in training were promised by the government to ensure that these women would be identified and protected. Yet, so far, police have had no training and have been given no resources to deal with the influx of vulnerable persons. The government committed funding in the 2007 budget to combat human trafficking.

Where is this money and where are the resources needed to protect women?

Olympic Winter GamesOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Niagara Falls Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson ConservativeMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I do not know where the hon. member has been, but there are more resources, more concentration on security for the Olympic Games than this country has ever seen for any event in the history of this country. The resources are there. The determination of this country to make everyone safe is there. The hon. member should be celebrating what this country is doing and what it will do in Vancouver.

JusticeOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

David Sweet Conservative Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, illicit drugs play an important role in gang violence across the country. Drug production and drug trafficking are, without a doubt, the most significant sources of illicit money for organized crime. Canadians from coast to coast support our government's legislation that targets drug offences involving organized crime gangs.

Would the Minister of Justice provide this House with an update on the status of Bill C-15?

JusticeOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Niagara Falls Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson ConservativeMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, drug dealers and drug producers must face serious consequences. This is why we brought in Bill C-15, our drug bill. It got the support of the House. It has the support of Canadians. However, it is the same old story in the Senate.

Last June I called upon the Leader of the Opposition to show some leadership by instructing his Liberal senators to get that bill passed before the summer. Instead, the other house adjourned the debate and it took a summer vacation. Now, five and a half months later, these same Liberal senators are back at it again delaying our bill.

Before these Liberals settle down for their winter vacation, let us get that bill passed. Canadians deserve better.

Status of WomenOral Questions

November 27th, 2009 / 11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Anita Neville Liberal Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, the member for Saskatoon—Wanuskewin cannot leave things well enough alone. Another release and the same outrageous claims. He attempts to defend his claims that abortion is linked to a greater risk of breast cancer and that it is part of a male agenda. It looks like the Reform Party extremists are able to show their true colours once again.

Does the Prime Minister agree with the member's claim? Is that why he refuses to denounce them?

Status of WomenOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Beauport—Limoilou Québec

Conservative

Sylvie Boucher ConservativeParliamentary Secretary for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, our government has been clear on this subject: all members of Parliament have the right to their own opinion. What is my opinion? I am in favour of freedom of choice.

Royal Canadian MintOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Richard Nadeau Bloc Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Royal Canadian Mint lost $15 million in gold and silver in 2008. The RCMP and external accountants have confirmed that this was neither the result of theft nor an accounting error. According to an internal source and a private company quoted in the Globe and Mail, part of the missing 550 kilograms simply was lost in the refining process.

Since the refining process used by the Royal Canadian Mint has not changed much in the past few years, will the minister acknowledge that the Royal Canadian Mint has sent more than $15 million of gold and silver directly down the drain?

Royal Canadian MintOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Yellowhead Alberta

Conservative

Rob Merrifield ConservativeMinister of State (Transport)

Mr. Speaker, since day one, this government has been very concerned about the unaccounted for missing gold at the Mint. That is why we brought in the RCMP to see if there was any possibility of theft.

We are convinced, as is the RCMP. It has concluded that there was no theft at the Mint. However, we are not satisfied how this was allowed to happen in the first place.

There is an external audit that has provided all of the explanations of where the unaccountable gold is, and that is in the hands of the Auditor General for validation. We will hold the Mint accountable as we get those numbers to ensure there is--

Royal Canadian MintOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

Order. The hon. member for Nickel Belt.

MuseumsOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle NDP Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, the employees of the Canadian War Museum and the Canadian Museum of Civilization have suffered enough. Ottawa's tourism industry has suffered enough. No one is winning in all this. Management's lastest proposals are miles away from the employees' demands. The employees appear to be the victims of penny pinching policies. Let us be serious. It is time to settle the dispute.

Will the government commit to appointing an arbitrator so that the parties can reach an agreement?

MuseumsOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Souris—Moose Mountain Saskatchewan

Conservative

Ed Komarnicki ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and to the Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, we currently agree that no one wins by this being protracted. We would encourage the parties to work as hard as they can to bring forth a settlement.

Under the law, the Minister of Labour cannot appoint an arbiter unless both parties agree. If both parties agree, an arbiter will be appointed.

Automotive IndustryOral Questions

Noon

Conservative

Dean Allison Conservative Niagara West—Glanbrook, ON

Mr. Speaker, our government invested in the auto sector, because it is crucial to Canada's economy and in particular to Ontario. We made the decision to preserve our share of the integrated North American auto sector when it was clear it was struggling. We already are seeing signs of hope and viability in this important industry.

Could the parliamentary secretary inform the House on some of the recent developments that show our crucial auto sector is back on the road to recovery?

Automotive IndustryOral Questions

Noon

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for his advocacy in this important area. When the prospects for the auto sector in Canada were at their worst, our government stepped up and took action to ensure Canada maintained its share of this important global industry. Now, thanks to our early action, we are beginning to see real and positive results in the Canadian auto industry.

Recently, Chrysler announced plans to resume full production at its minivan plant in Windsor. GM has confirmed this week that it will produce the new Buick Regal in Oshawa, which could create as many as 750 jobs.

Conservative Party of CanadaOral Questions

Noon

Liberal

Anita Neville Liberal Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister now calls women defenceless. He calls them a left-wing fringe group. The member for Saskatoon—Wanuskewin attacks a woman's right to choose. Government members have attacked aboriginals, called the unemployed no-good “you-know-whats” and played off religious and cultural groups one against another.

Are all these odious attacks a part of the government's divide and conquer strategy?

Conservative Party of CanadaOral Questions

Noon

Ottawa West—Nepean Ontario

Conservative

John Baird ConservativeMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, absolutely not.