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House of Commons Hansard #102 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was spam.

Topics

PensionsOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff LiberalLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, that answer will mystify the people who are struggling.

I have spoken about these pensioners many times. They do not understand the government's priorities: single-source stealth fighters, prisons, millions of dollars to clean up their messes. There are solutions to the Nortel pensioners' problem.

Why does the government show so little compassion and judgment on this issue?

PensionsOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper ConservativePrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, let us be clear. We have a lot of compassion for the pensioners in this situation, but the reality is that the outcome was decided in a court-approved settlement agreement. That was signed in accordance with the bankruptcy legislation in effect at the time.

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff LiberalLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, let me raise another issue. In sworn testimony before a House of Commons committee, explosive allegations were made about how the contract was awarded for the renovation of the West Block.

For a year now, we have been trying to get to the bottom of this sorry affair and now there are lurid allegations about the minister and his cashmere coat. Why is the minister still in his job? When will the Prime Minister tell Canadians the truth about this affair?

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper ConservativePrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the facts are very well known in this case. Officials have testified there is absolutely no political interference in the contracts. In fact, the individual the leader of the Liberal Party is quoting is an individual who lost the contract.

As for the minister's coat, the minister had an $800 coat stolen. He reported that to the police.

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Liberal Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, let us talk about the facts. This morning, Paul Sauvé said under oath that he was asked to pay $300,000 to have access to a system organized by the Conservatives that Quebeckers did not have access to.

Gilles Varin asked for $25,000 and asked that the rest be divided between other contacts directly related to his renovation contract, as a kickback.

Senator Pierre-Claude Nolin, his assistant, Hubert Pichet, and Bernard Côté, when he was the assistant to former minister Fortier, were linked to the contract being awarded.

His current political minister is aware of this.

Why is this minister still a member of the government?

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeMinister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, public servants are responsible for and manage the entire process relating to this contract. They were clear that in their opinion there was no political interference in this contract.

What Mr. Sauvé did say today at committee was that the only MP he had met with in the past number of years was the member for Bourassa. I wonder when those meetings took place. What was the nature of those business meetings?

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Liberal Bourassa, QC

That was a good try, Mr. Speaker.

This morning, Paul Sauvé said under oath that each contract required a 3% kickback and that fundraising events for Conservatives in Quebec had to be organized as a thank you.

Gilles Prud'homme, president of the Conservative association in Bourassa, who has ties to the construction industry, asked him to do fundraising for his party.

The Minister of Natural Resources talked about contracts with Joseph Broccolini for 40 minutes at this cocktail party.

Paul Sauvé talked about contracts at the cocktail party with the minister's assistant, Marc Vallières, who reported back to the minister.

Why is this minister still a member of the government?

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeMinister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, when it comes to the acquisition related to Broccolini and Multivesco, let me be clear that a fairness monitor oversaw the entire process for these acquisitions and she tabled those reports, which are available online. I encourage the hon. member to read them. In her summary, the fairness monitor said that decisions were made objectively, free from personal favouritism or political interference and they encompassed the elements of openness, competitiveness, transparency and compliance.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Bloc Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, a new UN study estimates that greenhouse gas emissions must be reduced to 44 billion tonnes a year by 2020 if we want to limit the rise in the earth's temperature to two degrees. A larger rise in temperature would have disastrous, irreversible consequences for the entire planet.

Will the Prime Minister adopt this new target in the fight against climate change, a target that will be put forward at the Cancun summit?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper ConservativePrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, for some time now, our government has been trying to get a mandatory agreement with all the world's major emitters to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Bloc Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister's only target in the fight against climate change is to not meet any targets, and it has to be said that he is doing a very good job at that. The Conservative government would rather lobby secretly for big oil in Alberta.

Will the Prime Minister finally admit that the fight against climate change is not his priority and never will be, regardless of how climate change will affect the environment?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper ConservativePrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, on the contrary, on the issue of climate change, we are trying to get an agreement with all the world's major emitters to reduce greenhouse gases. I am surprised that the Bloc leader and the Bloc do not support an agreement that will include countries like China, which is now the world's largest emitter.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Bloc Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, a state-of-the-art Canadian Coast Guard scientific research vessel has been leased to Esso and BP for oil exploration purposes. It is surprising to see the most important ship conducting research into climate change in the Arctic being leased to companies that are responsible for global warming.

Could the government explain this decision to us today?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Egmont P.E.I.

Conservative

Gail Shea ConservativeMinister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian Coast Guard provides the platform for marine research not just for DFO but other government departments as well as other science-based organizations. In this case, the Canadian Coast Guard provided cost recovered service to ArcticNet, which is a network of scientific centres of expertise.

ArcticNet works with various partners, including first nations, Inuit and industry, and everybody benefits from the co-operation on science as we maximize the return for investments. In this case, ArcticNet—

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Bloc Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the North American carbon exchanges are collapsing. According to Carolyn Quick, spokeswoman for the Montreal Exchange, there are very few transactions and the “favourable regulatory environment” still does not exist in Canada.

Does the Minister of the Environment realize that his refusal to implement firm targets and regulations regarding greenhouse gas emissions is jeopardizing the viability of the Montreal climate exchange?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean Ontario

Conservative

John Baird ConservativeLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the important thing is global action against climate change. It is absolutely essential for countries like Canada and the United States to work with countries like China and India to reduce greenhouse gases. That is precisely the purpose of the Copenhagen accord and we will continue to work toward that with our allies.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

November 23rd, 2010 / 2:25 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton NDP Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, all members of the House condemn the shelling of populated areas by North Korea. I am sure all members of the House would call on both sides to ensure there is no further escalation.

Could the Prime Minister assure us that there are strenuous diplomatic efforts on the part of Canada to avoid the escalation?

Can the Prime Minister assure us that we are making strenuous diplomatic efforts in Korea?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper ConservativePrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, let me make it very clear that Canada condemns, without reservation, the artillery attack by North Korea on the South Korean island of Yeonpyeong. On behalf of all Canadians, I want to express our condolences to the families of those killed as a result of this aggressive action.

Canada remains firm in its support of South Korea. We urge North Korea to refrain from further reckless and belligerent provocations and to abide by the Korean armistice agreement. I would point out that in response to these types of behaviour, Canada recently applied tough new sanctions to the North Korean regime.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton NDP Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, I thank the Prime Minister for his answer.

The Conservatives continue to refuse to hold a debate and a vote on extending the military mission in Afghanistan. The Liberal Party is not interested either. NATO is already talking about a mission beyond 2014. The government has already extended the deployment of our troops twice.

Does the government finally have an exit strategy for Afghanistan, or will our soldiers stay there indefinitely?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper ConservativePrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I attended NATO meetings with the Minister of National Defence and the Minister of Foreign Affairs. It is clear that our allies are trying to transfer responsibility for security to Afghan authorities by the end of 2014. I think that our allies share Canada's outlook and are trying to transfer this responsibility to the Afghans.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton NDP Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister says that we have to stay there until we get the job done, but he will not be precise about what the job is or how we are going to get it done. There are questions such as the following. What is the government's definition of success? What are the criteria that are to be used to measure progress? Where is the exit strategy?

We have been asking these questions for years now. Maybe if there had been some answers to these questions some time back, we would not be looking at an extension of our military mission, leaving our soldiers in a war zone for three more years.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper ConservativePrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I would urge the leader of the NDP to take a look at the quarterly reports that the government publishes on the Afghan mission. There are various metrics of success. One of those important metrics that we concentrated on at NATO was the training of Afghan military forces and police. That work is proceeding and progress is being made.

As for an exit strategy, of course, Canada's combat mission will end next year.

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Crombie Liberal Mississauga—Streetsville, ON

Mr. Speaker, a Conservative minister attempted to extort a $5,400 designer coat from a contractor. A Conservative riding association president demanded a fundraiser in exchange for a public works contract. A Conservative Senate staffer promised a public works contract in exchange for money. A Conservative lobbyist has been doling out cash around the party.

When will the Prime Minister hand the minister his designer coat and show him the door?

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean Ontario

Conservative

John Baird ConservativeLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, let us look at the facts here.

The minister's coat was stolen from a restaurant in the city of Montreal. The minister did not buy the coat at Holt Renfrew. He bought it in Thetford Mines. The coat is not worth $5,400. It is worth less than $800.

Maybe the Liberal Party could stop always blaming the victims of crime.