This week, I changed much of the tech behind this site. If you see anything that looks like a bug, please let me know!

House of Commons Hansard #102 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was spam.

Topics

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Skeena—Bulkley Valley.

Fisheries and OceansOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen NDP Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, the government has invested $30 million to retrofit the Amundsen icebreaker in order to conduct climate change research. However, it is currently being leased to oil companies to drill in the Arctic. As usual, this government says one thing and does another.

Why promote drilling and the destruction of the Arctic with a vessel that is supposed to protect it?

Fisheries and OceansOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Egmont P.E.I.

Conservative

Gail Shea ConservativeMinister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, this contract was with ArcticNet. ArcticNet is a network of scientific centres of expertise and it contracts with different partners. One of those partners is industry because science is also important to industry.

In this case, ArcticNet and industry were studying environmental impacts associated with industrial activities. That is very important. Everybody benefits from more science because it allows all of us to make more informed decisions for future generations.

Fisheries and OceansOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen NDP Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are shocked to learn that Canada's best climate change research vessel was leased to Esso and BP to help them look for offshore oil in the Arctic. This is the same BP that spilled 800 million litres of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. The Amundsen was refitted, at a cost of $30 million to taxpayers, to research climate change, not to look for oil for some of the biggest polluters on the planet.

Why are the Conservatives using this ship, meant to be fighting climate change, to throw out the welcome mat for risky Arctic drilling?

Fisheries and OceansOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Egmont P.E.I.

Conservative

Gail Shea ConservativeMinister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, for several months during the summertime this ship becomes the platform for marine research, for DFO, for other government departments as well as other science-based organizations. Science is very important to all the decisions we make, not just this government but NGOs and private industry as well.

We all benefit from the science that happens. In this case what happened was an examination of the environment to better understand impacts associated with industrial activities.

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Bloc Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, Paul Sauvé has confirmed that he paid Conservative activist Gilles Varin $118,000. He said he is convinced that without the help of that unregistered lobbyist, he would not have won the West Block contract. To thank the Conservative government, he even organized a cocktail fundraiser that was attended by the former minister of public works and the Conservatives' Quebec lieutenant.

Will the government admit that the evidence given by contractor Paul Sauvé confirms that, when it comes to contracts, all a contractor needs to do is pay a lobbyist in order to play and win?

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean Ontario

Conservative

John Baird ConservativeLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, what the member is saying is again false. Here are the facts. Mr. Varin was not a member of the Conservative Party, is not a Conservative Party advisor and is not a Conservative activist. He has no history with the Conservative Party.

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Bloc Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, Paul Sauvé is not the only one who profited from the system. The two Broccolini brothers won two contracts worth $600 million after attending the cocktail fundraiser with the former public works minister. According to Paul Sauvé, the two Broccolini brothers, who were trying to get more contracts and more details on an important invitation to tender, monopolized the minister during the entire event.

Will the government admit that the Broccolini brothers' actions paid off, since they won both of the contracts they wanted?

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeMinister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, as I pointed out before, when it comes to the Broccolini and Multivesco acquisitions that the government made, a fairness monitor oversaw the entire process of these acquisitions and tabled reports, which are available online. I encourage the member to read them.

The fairness monitor said that the process unfolded in an objective way, free from personal favouritism and political interference and encompassed the elements of openness, competitiveness, transparency and compliance.

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

John McCallum Liberal Markham—Unionville, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is becoming increasingly clear that the government's arbitrary deadline will have a negative impact on our municipalities, particularly municipalities in Quebec.

The government knows that over 1,000 projects are threatened by this irresponsible policy.

Instead of putting thousands of jobs at risk, why does the government not just extend the deadline?

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl ConservativeMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, as the member knows, this government is known for being fair and reasonable. That is how we are being on this case as well. We have been talking to all the provinces. We have been talking to the municipalities. They have been giving us the data on the status of their infrastructure projects.

What we do know so far is that it has helped to create about 420,000 or 430,000 net new jobs through the economic action plan. We are going to be working with them to be fair and reasonable. We have already done that by helping to re-scope some projects to ensure they can be done on time.

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

John McCallum Liberal Markham—Unionville, ON

Mr. Speaker, the minister should listen to Premier Dalton McGuinty who said recently, “it just wouldn't make sense to walk away from projects that are four walls without a roof”, and he is right.

The government's hollow promise to be fair and reasonable provides no comfort at all to tens of thousands of workers in the construction trade. Is the minister forgetting that jobs are at stake? When will he put down the gun he is holding to the head of municipalities and issue a blanket extension of the deadline? It makes sense.

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl ConservativeMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted today with this question because I hear the hon. member saying that there are tens of thousands of jobs being created by these projects. I remember last week when he said that there were not any jobs being created. He was kind of Mr. Humbug. Clearly the Federation of Canadian Municipalities says that hundreds of thousands of jobs have been created.

We are working closely with the FCM and with the Government of Quebec. We are working with the proponents of these projects to see how we can work with them to adjust them. We always say that we will be fair and reasonable, and that is what we are doing.

Government PrioritiesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan NDP Edmonton Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, after encouraging Edmonton's bid on Expo 2017 as recently as three weeks ago, the government now pulls the rug out from under Alberta's capital. That same government, for a one-day G8 meeting, gave tens of millions to a Conservative cabinet minister's Ontario riding: $16.7 million for an arena, $100,000 for a gazebo, $200,000 for a welcome sign, $300,000 for a toilet and $400,000 for a steamboat refit.

Why the open government wallets for Ontario ridings, but austerity for Edmonton?

Government PrioritiesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam B.C.

Conservative

James Moore ConservativeMinister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, yesterday I spoke to the mayor of Edmonton, Mr. Mandel, and Sheila Weatherill of the bid committee to let them know that our government would not go forward with Edmonton Expo 2017 because this project was too large, too expensive and it was too large of a financial risk for Canadian taxpayers.

We think it is the responsible thing to do, and I am glad we are not alone. Here is what was said by the Taxpayers Federation. It said, “Citizens of Edmonton and the province of Alberta should be thanking the federal government for showing leadership in saying no to this dangerous project”.

Government PrioritiesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan NDP Edmonton Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, that is what the federation says about the Conservative spending.

Edmonton's expo on clean energy was supported by municipalities across the country, with the resulting benefits to all provinces from the influx of 5.3 million tourists and badly needed jobs. Clearly the government can find the money for pet projects in target ridings.

This decision is not about money. It is about politics. Why are Conservatives taking Edmonton for granted? What exactly did the regional minister do to secure federal support?

Government PrioritiesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam B.C.

Conservative

James Moore ConservativeMinister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, this Conservative government has delivered more projects to Edmonton and Alberta than any government in Canadian history. This government has done the responsible thing.

When it comes to large international projects such as Expo 2017, we did the right thing. We examined this project. We gave it the respect it was due. We looked at all of the costs associated with it. The reality is this is too expensive of a project. They were asking for over $700 million from the federal government. It would have cost well over $1 billion. This is a financial risk that taxpayers of Edmonton and Alberta do not want us to take.

Public SafetyOral Questions

November 23rd, 2010 / 2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Phil McColeman Conservative Brant, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the public safety committee heard pleas from the convicted criminals to keep Canada's pardon system as is. Like so many times before, the Liberal public safety critic showed that he put the rights of criminals before the rights of victims.

The member for Ajax—Pickering was quick to advocate on behalf of convicted criminals and suggested our pardon reforms would be endangering public safety.

Our Conservative government believes in getting tough on crime. Could the Minister of Public Safety speak to this issue?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Provencher Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews ConservativeMinister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government will always put the rights of victims and the public safety first. Unlike the Liberal public safety critic, we believe investments that keep dangerous criminals behind bars make Canada a safer place to live and raise a family and we believe the rights of criminals should not come first in our criminal justice system.

We call upon the opposition to finally listen to victims, support the bill, a bill that would deny child sex offenders the right to ever receive a pardon.

Ferry ServicesOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Liberal Cardigan, PE

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities.

It is my understanding that the Minister of Transport has received the controversial public service review on the Wood Islands Caribou ferry service.

Will the minister confirm in the House today that he will provide a contract of no less than five years to ensure the people of Pictou County, Nova Scotia and eastern Prince Edward Island will have the same level of service as they have had for the last six years?

Ferry ServicesOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl ConservativeMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we have been having those discussions as he knows both with the ministers from Prince Edward Island as well as the tourism folks that were in town the other week. We had a good meeting with them.

Other discussions are taking place with Nova Scotia as well to talk about what the future of the Wood Islands ferry may look like. I know it is an important part of the transportation system in Prince Edward Island and discussions are taking place on what form that might take.

The ferry operators are involved as well. This is an important issue to the Government of Canada and we will be making a decision in due course.

Forillon ParkOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Raynald Blais Bloc Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine, QC

Mr. Speaker, 2010 marks the sad anniversary of the expropriation of several hundred family homes in the Gaspé to make way for Forillon Park. Now, 40 years later, the families whose land was expropriated are still waiting for an official apology from the federal government. They also want the passport that allows them free access to the site to be extended to five generations, specifically in order to access the three cemeteries in the park where their ancestors are buried.

Will the minister responsible for Parks Canada do as the displaced Forillon families have asked?

Forillon ParkOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean Ontario

Conservative

John Baird ConservativeLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I am always willing to work with my colleagues in the House of Commons on issues that matter to their constituents. I was willing to meet with the Bloc Québécois member regarding this very important issue.

Mining IndustryOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Niki Ashton NDP Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, on October 4 the federal government announced it was giving a $1 billion loan to Vale. That is billion with a b.

Last week we found out that it will be stripping more than 600 jobs from the Thompson operation. The government has made Vale Canada's number one corporate welfare bum. Yet, the industry minister is refusing to have a real meeting with Thompson and the province where people are losing their jobs.

Why is the government not dealing with Vale, and why is it not working with the community and the province to save the jobs in Thompson and Manitoba? Why is it standing up for Vale and not for Canadians?

Mining IndustryOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Pontiac Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon ConservativeMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member should actually expand the story a little bit.

This unfortunate situation in her constituency was part of a more general announcement made by Vale of a $10 billion multi-year investment in Canada, in various provinces, in various projects, I am sure creating many hundreds of jobs in those locations.

The situation in Thompson is different. There is no question about it. I have had the opportunity to brief the hon. member through my staff on the situation. I have spoken with the Manitoba government about the situation—