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House of Commons Hansard #29 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was taxes.

Topics

Police and Peace Officers' National Memorial DayStatements By Members

11 a.m.

Conservative

Lois Brown Conservative Newmarket—Aurora, ON

Mr. Speaker, on September 24, 1998, the Government of Canada officially proclaimed the last Sunday of September of every year as Police and Peace Officers' National Memorial Day.

This national memorial day gives Canadians an opportunity each year to formally express appreciation for the dedication of police and peace officers who made the ultimate tragic sacrifice to keep our communities safe.

For the last 12 years, I have had the honour and privilege of attending the memorial as accompanist of the North York Regional Police Male Chorus. This September 25, it was a spectacular sight to see the thousands of men and women in uniform on Parliament Hill gathered to honour those who had fallen and to support the families left behind.

Today I invite all my colleagues to join me in saluting police and peace officers in service across our country and in honouring those who died while protecting their communities, for they are our heroes. We shall not forget them.

MulticulturalismStatements By Members

11 a.m.

NDP

Jasbir Sandhu NDP Surrey North, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister recently said that “Islamicism” is the biggest security threat to our country. This is shocking and insulting. The Prime Minister's comments are misleading and deeply offensive to the many peaceful Muslims in my community and across the country.

It sets a very dangerous precedent when we have a Prime Minister willing to use divisive language like this to drive wedges between people and communities for political purposes.

Muslims, and no doubt tolerant Canadians of all faiths, do not want to see our communities pitted against each other by anyone, let alone our own Prime Minister, and have asked that he apologize for these insensitive remarks.

Tolerance and respect for diversity are the foundation of a peaceful society. We can make our country secure without resorting to divisive politics and without creating a climate of fear.

On behalf of the Muslim community in my constituency and all those across Canada, I ask the Prime Minister to apologize for these regrettable statements.

Importation of Intoxicating Liquors ActStatements By Members

11 a.m.

Conservative

Dan Albas Conservative Okanagan—Coquihalla, BC

Mr. Speaker, earlier this week I introduced my private member's bill calling for an end to wine prohibition in Canada. Bill C-311, if passed by my colleagues, will allow Canadian wineries to sell to Canadians all across this great country, something that the 83-year old prohibition era Importation of Intoxicating Liquors Act currently makes illegal.

After I introduced my bill the phone started to ring: CBC Halifax, Niagara This Week, the St. Catharine's Standard and others.

It turns out Nova Scotia is an emerging wine region with roughly 15 wineries. It can produce great wines in places like the Annapolis Valley and elsewhere.

Twenty years ago in British Columbia we had roughly 15 wineries. Today in B.C. we have close to 200. Think about the potential for Nova Scotia.

Ontario Niagara region has close to 16,000 acres planted in grapes. In the province of Quebec there are now close to 50 wineries.

In fact, there are now wineries in every province across Canada.

Ending wine prohibition will help family-owned wineries all across Canada. I hope my colleagues will support Bill C-311.

The EnvironmentStatements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Liberal Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, together all the world's peoples face common vulnerabilities from climate change to depleted ozone that transcend borders. No country, community, no corporation can exist apart from its environment.

Fortunately a significant number of companies are recognizing our common future. One such company is Molson Coors, which believes good business practices embrace environmental stewardship. The company is proud of its positive trend in its environmental impact, its great Canadian shoreline cleanups and its Molson Canadian Red Leaf Project, an ongoing commitment to give back to the land that sustains us by planting 100,000 trees from coast to coast to coast.

Molson Coors understands that when we compromise the air, the water, the soil and the variety of life, we steal from the endless future to serve the fleeting present. What will our organization do to preserve our planet?

The EnvironmentStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Conservative Calgary Centre-North, AB

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to speak to our government's work on the chemicals management plan, an important and valuable program that focuses on assessing the risks of approximately 4,300 chemicals, including products currently found in Canadian households. Through this plan, chemicals have been identified as potential risks to human health and to the environment.

To date, the Government of Canada has addressed approximately 1,100 high priority chemicals found in consumer products and industrial applications in Canada, through three of the chemicals management plan's main initiatives: the challenge to industry; the rapid screening of substances of lower concern; and the petroleum sector stream approach.

These important initiatives have enabled our government to take important steps to continue to protect Canadians from harmful chemicals in products and to protect our environment against potential risks.

Shawville FairStatements By Members

October 7th, 2011 / 11:05 a.m.

NDP

Mathieu Ravignat NDP Pontiac, QC

Mr. Speaker, on Labour Day weekend past, the Pontiac Agricultural Society celebrated the 155th anniversary of the Shawville Fair. This event has been bringing the community together longer than Confederation.

I believe that agricultural fairs like the one in Shawville are a time to celebrate and recognize an industry that is so important to our lives and also to thank farmers themselves for all their hard work keeping quality nutritious food on our tables.

Since William Clark and his directors held the first Shawville agricultural fair, many changes have occurred over the years. However, the essential goal remains the same: creating a showplace for local products and allowing farmers to interact with their urban cousins.

Of course, the fair could not exist without hundreds of volunteers. I want to congratulate and thank them for making this such a great success.

This being harvest season, I would also like to take this opportunity to salute all the farmers in my riding, from the pastures in L'Ange-Gardien and the fields of Gracefield, to the meadows of Fort-Coulonge: my sincere congratulations.

All hon. members are cordially invited to attend the 156th anniversary edition of the Shawville fair next year.

Religious FreedomStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

David Sweet Conservative Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, the ruling Iranian regime continues its unrelenting attack on human rights against its own citizens.

While seven leaders of the Baha'i community remain in prison in Iran on trumped up charges dating back over three years, we have reported another case before us where an Iranian citizen is jailed because of his religious beliefs. The most recent victim is Pastor Youcef Nadarkhani, whose only crime is staying true to his Christian faith and refusing to recant. For that, he has been sentenced to death.

Iran not only breaches its international obligations regarding religious freedom, but in actions like this, that are too common in Iran under this present regime, it is guilty of crimes under its own constitution.

In the recent Speech from the Throne, our government renewed our pledge to create an office of religious freedom to monitor and combat exactly this kind of human rights violations and religious intolerance around the globe.

I ask all members of the House of Commons and all Canadians to raise their voices in unison to pressure the Iranian authorities to abide by their own constitution, fulfill their international obligations and release Pastor Youcef Nadarkhani and the seven Baha'i leaders now.

Small BusinessStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Joe Daniel Conservative Don Valley East, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted to stand before the House today to report that the government's economic plan is working, and in particular, for small businesses.

I am pleased to announce that on October 19 of this month a new business will be opening in my riding. Despite the global economic turmoil, Canada is still the best place for small businesses. On October 19, owner Bani Azan will be opening a Cora franchise on York Mills Road in Don Valley East. This will create a number of new jobs in my riding.

The actions that the government is taking to help small businesses will give this business a good start in establishing itself and securing its long-term future.

I congratulate Bani Azan and Cora on opening this business and wish them the very best for the future.

This government's small-business initiatives will create new businesses, new jobs and growth in existing businesses.

Quebec City HIV-AIDS OrganizationStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

NDP

Annick Papillon NDP Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, 26 years ago today, on October 7, the first clinic in Canada dedicated exclusively to AIDS testing opened in Vancouver. One year later in Quebec City, in a climate of uncertainty, MIELS-Québec, an information and support movement in the fight against HIV-AIDS, was founded. Some 25 years later, thanks to its experienced team of employees, its many volunteers and support from valued partners, this movement remains as active as ever in the Quebec City region.

MIELS-Québec has become an undisputed leader thanks to the prevention services it offers, as well as the information it provides on testing, psychological and social support, housing and recovery.

I wish to sincerely commend the exceptional work of its executive director, Thérèse Richer, and her entire team. Congratulations to MIELS-Québec on 25 years of dedication to our community. I also wish to highlight the support provided by other organizations in Quebec City working on the same cause. While much progress has been made, the fight must go on.

The EconomyStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Candice Bergen Conservative Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, our government's top priority remains completing the economic recovery. Canadians gave our Conservative government a strong mandate to stay focused on what matters: creating jobs and economic growth. We are the only G7 country that has regained more than all of the jobs that were lost during the downturn.

We have recently been ranked as the best country for business and as the country with the best economic reputation. These are key opportunities for Canada to show leadership and promote strong and sustainable growth in the short and long-term and work on ways to strengthen market confidence and promote global recovery.

That is why our Conservative government is staying the course, with our low-tax plan to create jobs and growth. That is why the last thing the Canadian economy needs is a massive NDP tax hike that would kill jobs, stall our recovery and set Canadian families back.

Sports in La Pointe-de-l'ÎleStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Ève Péclet NDP La Pointe-de-l'Île, QC

Mr. Speaker, on a different note, I am pleased to rise in the House today to celebrate the success of the Rangers, a hockey team from Montreal East. The team is currently ranked first in its AAA league. I would like to thank the municipality of Montreal East and those in charge of the team, but I would primarily like to congratulate the players for managing to balance sports and schooling. I tip my hat to them and encourage them to exercise their passion for our national sport while excelling in their studies. Go Rangers!

Last Saturday I attended the awards ceremony for those who volunteer with the Pointe-aux-Trembles soccer association. I would like to congratulate all the coaches, assistants, volunteers and the board of directors for their time and devotion, which has allowed these young people to flourish in a sport that encourages team spirit and respect. I would like to thank you for your commitment to helping our community's youth.

Science and TechnologyStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Susan Truppe Conservative London North Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, our government has invested more in science and technology than any government in Canadian history, creating jobs, growing our economy and improving the quality of life for all Canadians. In fact, Canada leads the G7 in terms of investment in higher education, research and development.

Now for the first time the International Council for Science has elected a Canadian as its president. Dr. Gordon McBean of the University of Western Ontario was recently elected president of the council, which boasts a global membership that represents 141 countries. The council has a long-term vision for a world where science is used for the benefit of all.

A distinguished Canadian scientist, Dr. McBean has been the recipient of the Order of Canada and the Order of Ontario and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. This is truly an impressive accomplishment. On behalf of our government I want to congratulate Dr. McBean on his new role.

I know I speak for all Canadians when I say that I am proud of the leadership Canadian scientists are showing the world.

Ontario ElectionStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Ted Hsu Liberal Kingston and the Islands, ON

Mr. Speaker, the trifecta was rejecta.

Congratulations to the Premier of Ontario, Dalton McGuinty, and his Liberal team, who won the well-deserved right to form the third consecutive Liberal government.

Dalton McGuinty's Liberals earned the respect of Ontarians by making the decisions that were needed even when those decisions were not popular. The people of Ontario have turned to the Liberal government they trust in these perilous economic times to invest their resources wisely, to plan for Ontario's future in health care, education, energy and the jobs of the 21st century.

The Liberal movement is alive and well in Ontario.

I wish to especially congratulate John Gerretsen, one of the finest public servants in Ontario, and MPP for my home riding, Kingston and the Islands.

Thank you to everyone, from all parties, who worked on this election. You are what makes democracy work.

Yom KippurStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Conservative Nepean—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, tonight Jewish families across our beautiful country begin their Yom Kippur observances. They mark the holy day and celebrate the ancient and strong Jewish faith. Judaism is a religion that binds families and communities. It is a religion that demonstrates the value of thoughtfulness, forgiveness and atonement. This Jewish holy day is an occasion for us to wish members of the community a prayerful Yom Kippur.

Today, across our dominion, Jewish Canadians will gather with friends and families to reflect and seek reconciliation with God. They will pray for peace and they will repent.

The Talmud states the Books of Life and Death are open until Yom Kippur and on Yom Kippur a final decision is made about our faith in the new year. For my constituents and all Canadians of the Jewish faith, we all wish them a happy and rewarding Yom Kippur.

Nobel Peace PrizeStatements By Members

11:15 a.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière NDP Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted to rise today to honour the three women recipients of the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize: Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Leymah Gbowee, and Tawakkul Karman.

They were awarded the prize “for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women's rights to full participation in peace-building work.”

The important strides in peace-building these women have made remind us that Canada must live up to its international obligations under UN Security Council resolution 1325 to involve women at decision-making levels in conflict resolution and peace processes around the world.

The award is a victory for the many women working worldwide for peace, democracy and social justice. On behalf of the official opposition, I wish to extend our warmest congratulations to these three exemplary women.

Political DonationsStatements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

Kerry-Lynne Findlay Conservative Delta—Richmond East, BC

Mr. Speaker, questionable NDP fundraising tactics have been referred to Canada's elections commissioner for investigation.

It was revealed two weeks ago that the NDP has received at least $85,000 from their big union bosses for their latest convention. Is the NDP forgetting or just ignoring the fact that these sorts of donations were banned in 2005?

We have urged the NDP to come clean and provide full disclosure of all contributions, but they have been silent on the issue. Why will the NDP not come forward and be transparent? Will they be using these same improper tactics for their upcoming leadership convention?

JusticeOral Questions

11:15 a.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair NDP Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government is violating the rights of Parliament by forcing the passage of its omnibus crime bill without debate. In fact, a number of aspects of this bill are very debatable. According to the Parliamentary Budget Officer, the government's estimates of the costs have no rhyme or reason. They are not based on any specific methodology or verifiable information, and they do not take provincial costs into account.

When will this government finally be honest with the provinces? When will it finally be honest with Canadians about the real cost of its so-called law and order agenda?

JusticeOral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Delta—Richmond East B.C.

Conservative

Kerry-Lynne Findlay ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice

Mr. Speaker, the fact is that the cost of crime on Canadian society far exceeds the cost of fighting crime. The fact is that last spring we provided the committee with hundreds of pages of documents that go into precise detail on costing.

For the hon. member's benefit, the Minister of Justice recently tabled a summary of these documents at the justice committee. They show very clearly that the federal cost of Bill C-10 is $78.6 million over five years.

We are working with our provincial and territorial partners on these costs. We believe that working in collaboration with them is important to ensure a strong justice system.

JusticeOral Questions

11:15 a.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair NDP Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, it cost some $73 million for a website. Are we to believe that is the real cost?

Members know that this government loves to hand out cheques written on other people's money. With respect to the provincial costs of the bill, the Parliamentary Budget Officer—a man of authority who is neutral, independent and credible, and who is never wrong, whereas the government always tries to ram false information down our throats—is accusing the government of obstruction. Quebec does not seem too worried because it said this morning that it will be asking the federal government to reimburse every dollar.

What will this government do?

JusticeOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Delta—Richmond East B.C.

Conservative

Kerry-Lynne Findlay ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice

Mr. Speaker, I reiterate that the Department of Justice study in 2008 tagged the cost of crime on society at almost $100 billion in that year alone. That it was borne by victims by 83% is what we are concerned about mostly.

Since our government took office, support payments to the provinces have increased by 30%, or $12.7 billion. In budget 2010-11, we announced transfer payments to the provinces and territories of $54 billion, an increase of $2.4 billion over last year.

JusticeOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair NDP Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives have always boasted they would not download to the provinces. That is exactly what this is. No one believes them, especially not the highly credible Parliamentary Budget Officer, who is always right whenever they are trying to give false information.

Now they want Canadians to believe that their massive prison agenda will cost no more than their website. Nobody believes them. Canadians do not buy it, the PBO certainly does not and the government knows it is hiding the true cost to the provinces of the downloading of the prison expenses.

Provinces want more front-line police, not a bill for more prisons that the Conservatives dictated. When will the government come clean with the provinces on the true cost of its prison agenda?

JusticeOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Delta—Richmond East B.C.

Conservative

Kerry-Lynne Findlay ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice

Mr. Speaker, it would be refreshing if just for once the opposition members would really look at the cost of crime on the victims and on law-abiding Canadians.

We are following through on our commitment to help victims of crime, particularly those most vulnerable, the children in our society, and to protect them from those who would traffic in illegal drugs.

We would love it if the opposition would get on board with these initiatives to help those who are the most vulnerable in society.

Committees of the HouseOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

NDP

Guy Caron NDP Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, last week opposition MPs tried to get the public accounts committee to study past Auditor General reports.

Conservatives forced the meeting behind closed doors, an assault on transparency and accountability. Now it turns out this committee did not adopt a motion to deal with these important issues on government waste and mismanagement.

The Conservative member for Sault Ste. Marie was even quoted by the media as saying, “At this stage of the game, I want to start with a fresh slate”.

Do Conservatives object to the Auditor General's past reports being studied?

Committees of the HouseOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

York—Simcoe Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan ConservativeLeader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, as we all know, committees are masters of their own destiny, but I would say this: right now our government is engaged in an effort to try to reduce government spending and reduce the size of government, and every step of the way it is the opposition members who are objecting to that.

We appreciate the efforts of the Auditor General to assist us in providing reports that help us to find examples of government waste.

We know we want to eliminate them. We know we want to reduce government spending. We know that every time we try to do it, those guys get upset. They are objecting to our efforts to cut down on spending.

Committees of the HouseOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

NDP

Guy Caron NDP Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives continue to hide the truth from Canadians. An opposition motion to study the Auditor General's previous reports was not adopted by the Standing Committee on Public Accounts: reports on cost overruns for military helicopters, the $500,000 severance paid to the integrity commissioner, and mismanaged renovations on Parliament Hill.

The Conservative member for Sault Ste. Marie even told the media, “With the election, much has changed.”

Why will this government not let the Standing Committee on Public Accounts do its work? What does it have to hide?