House of Commons Hansard #51 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was senators.

Topics

Justice
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Françoise Boivin Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, I suppose that is why, this morning, during the first hearings on the clause-by-clause review, we adopted half of the first 100 clauses in the bill. And the government says we do not support some parts of the bill.

What Quebec is asking is simple and reasonable. Its approach to rehabilitating young offenders is working. Moreover, a majority of provinces refuse to have to foot the bill for senseless reforms. Quebec's minister of justice feels betrayed. He says he is dealing with a Reform Party government, not with the Government of Canada.

When will this government stop making ideological decisions and do what the majority of Canadians—

Justice
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order, please. The hon. Minister of Justice.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, again, I will point out that a number of the recommendations and changes to that bill have come directly from provincial attorneys general. In fact, the most recent amendment we have taken comes straight from the minister of justice of Quebec, with respect to changing the words from “encourager” to “favoriser”. This recommendation was made by the minister of Justice of Quebec.

We are happy to comply, but again the bill has been before Parliament for quite some time. We have had quite a bit of input and for once it should have the support of the NDP.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Blaine Calkins Wetaskiwin, AB

Mr. Speaker, our government is committed to putting actual criminals behind bars. Canadians who have been the victim of a crime should not be re-victimized by our justice system. Canadians are rightfully concerned when law-abiding citizens are unfairly arrested or even charged for simply defending their property from criminals. This is unacceptable to our government.

While the opposition is obstructing and delaying legislation that cracks down on drug dealers, pedophiles and arsonists, our government is putting the rights of law-abiding citizens ahead of the rights of criminals.

Could the Minister of Justice please inform the House how our government is acting to further protect law-abiding Canadians?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I had the pleasure today of introducing the citizen's arrest and self-defence act.

The member is correct that Canadians are rightfully concerned when law-abiding citizens are re-victimized by the justice system simply for defending their property. While Canadians should contact the police if their property or personal safety is threatened, we recognize that it is not always feasible in the circumstances. The legislation we introduced today expands, simplifies and clarifies the laws when individuals need to respond to immediate threats.

I know the opposition is focused on farmers and duck hunters, but this should have its support for a change.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, climate change talks start next week in Durban and the government cannot seem to get its stories straight. First, it claims to be committed to the environment, but then it muzzles its scientists. Then it claims to target redundancies in the system, but we have a senior government official who says that there are no redundancies. Therefore, we know we will be a laughingstock at Durban because we cannot even get the job done at home.

When will the minister realize that he is the Minister of the Environment and actually take action on the government's appalling environmental record?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I welcome my colleague back from her treacherous adventure abroad. I am sure Canadian workers and our resource industries will rest much more quietly now that she is back in this place.

Canada goes to Durban with a number of countries sharing the same objectives, and that is to put Kyoto behind us and to encourage all nations and all major emitting countries to embrace a new agreement to reduce greenhouse gas in a material way.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, there is a hole in the ozone above the Arctic that is twice the size of Ontario and the government's solution is to muzzle the scientists who found the hole and slash the budget of the people who monitor it. This hole is allowing harmful ultraviolet rays into our communities. Therefore, this is about protecting our children and our grandchildren.

When will the minister put down his talking points, listen to the scientific community and his own advisors and become the Minister of the Environment? It is never too late to learn.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for those gracious words and I will reassure her again that my department, Environment Canada, will continue to monitor ozone. I would remind her, in this week when parties to the Montreal protocol were so effective in addressing contaminants in the atmosphere that depleted ozone, that Canada is once again taking a leadership role.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Laurin Liu Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the former Conservative environment minister said yesterday that Canada must improve the oil sands' environmental record. Jim Prentice said it himself: to do so will require work and investments.

If nothing is done, we risk losing access to markets such as Europe and the United States.

When will this government come up with a plan for the sustainable development of our resources?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the opposition, and I have said this many times in the House, should celebrate Canada as an emerging clean energy superpower.

If I could offer my colleague a quote from the former minister yesterday, he said:

I think there's been substantial progress made, but I think as events have unfolded, both in the United States on Keystone and on other issues, it highlights how important it is that Canada be not only a producer of energy, but an environmentally responsible producer of energy.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Laurin Liu Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is not an environmental activist who said this but a former Conservative environment minister who is calling for a sustainable plan for oil sands exports. On Monday, he even said that Alberta's oil sands industry has an extremely negative reputation on the world stage. He added that it was important that Canada be not only an energy producer but an environmentally responsible energy producer.

Will the government listen to its former environment minister?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Conservative

Joe Oliver Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the NDP should know that it is always risky to alienate one's political base, but especially when one is in pre-merger discussions.

I will list the labour unions which support Keystone because it will create thousands of jobs, and I may run out of time. The list includes the International Union of Operating Engineers, the Laborers' International Union of North America, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, the Building and Construction Trades Department, AFL-CIO, the United Association of Journeymen, Apprentices of the—

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

I am afraid the hon. minister is out of time.

The hon. member for Random—Burin—St. George's.

Search and Rescue
Oral Questions

November 22nd, 2011 / 2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Judy Foote Random—Burin—St. George's, NL

Mr. Speaker, just days before the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans was in St. John's, where he refused an invitation to visit the Maritime Rescue Sub-Centre, members of the Canadian Marine Advisory Council, the body Transport Canada consults on marine safety, were signing a petition in Ottawa, calling on the government to rescind its decision to close the centre.

Since the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans will not visit the centre, see the operation first hand and see the need to keep it open, I ask the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities to do so and stop this reckless move.