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House of Commons Hansard #162 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was omnibus.

Topics

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

This is really eating up a lot of time. These outbursts before the member is finished putting the question are not helpful. The hon. member for Halifax still has the floor.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie NDP Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, will they defend the Prime Minister or will they throw him under the bus?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper ConservativePrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, if the member keeps leading with her chin, I am prepared to keep going for it.

This government, the Minister of the Environment, has taken important steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in this country including, most recently, a comprehensive plan to gradually eliminate coal-fired electricity in this country, which is the biggest single source of greenhouse gas emissions in the world. We are doing that without imposing taxes on carbon.

The NDP, in the name of environmental progress, wants to take money from Canadian taxpayers to spend. We will not let them do that.

EthicsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie NDP Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, it seems that the Conservatives are caught in a bit of an ethical dilemma here. They are making things up about the NDP; they are denying that they ever supported a price on carbon—

EthicsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

Order. The hon. member for Halifax has had several interruptions during her questions. It is not helpful to the Chamber, and it is eating up a lot of time. We will have to find that time somewhere else now.

The hon. member for Halifax still has the floor.

EthicsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie NDP Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, day after day Conservative MPs and ministers are making things up. They are spouting mistruths and they are misleading Canadians. This is a major ethical issue.

My question is to the chair of the ethics committee. I would like to know whether or not this issue is on the committee's agenda.

EthicsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Pierre-Luc Dusseault NDP Sherbrooke, QC

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the hon. member for her very apt question.

The Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics deals with very important matters. The committee is currently conducting a study on privacy and social media.

In committee or in the House, MPs should conduct themselves in a very ethical manner, including not making things up about other parties.

Conservative tactics have been denounced widely, with some media even asking how stupid the Conservatives think Canadians are.

As the chair of the ethics committee, I invite my colleagues across the way to address that question in committee if they want.

International TradeOral Questions

October 16th, 2012 / 2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Liberal Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, one year ago Canada's negotiator on CETA told the trade committee that government had done internal analysis on the issue of drug costs. However, the minister refused us that study stating: “No, they're not available to this committee”.

Now the Canadian Press, based on these studies, has confirmed our worst fear that European patents will increase Canadian drug costs by $2 billion per year.

Will the minister admit to these additional drug costs to Canadians as a result of CETA, and will he now allow the committee access to that analysis in full?

International TradeOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member may not have been paying attention, but this trade agreement is still being negotiated. These negotiations are still going on. Nothing has been decided at this point.

I would say that our government always thought to strike a balance between promoting innovation and job creation and ensuring that Canadians continue to have access to the affordable drugs that they need. I would finally say that the House can be assured that our government will not sign the agreement unless it is in the best interest of all Canadians.

Regional Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Liberal Ottawa—Vanier, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday I asked a straightforward question to the Minister of Industry. I even complimented the government. What I got was a rather bizarre response, so I will try again.

Last week, during the International Summit of Cooperatives, a $30 million fund was created to support co-operatives in the province of Quebec. The Business Development Bank, a federal institution, is putting $10 million in the fund. Here is my question. I hope the minister is listening. When can we expect similar announcements from the BDC for co-ops in the other provinces and territories of Canada?

Regional Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis ConservativeMinister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, there is nothing bizarre about listing the good measures we have taken for co-operatives, which are an economic driver in Canada.

As the hon. opposition member knows, the Business Development Bank of Canada operates independently of the government. It would therefore be inappropriate for me to speculate on the BDC's future plans. The committee tabled its report in September. We are reviewing that report and will respond to it in due course.

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Jinny Sims NDP Newton—North Delta, BC

Mr. Speaker, the member for Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar has sent out a mail-out gloating about health care cuts to refugee claimants. She is bragging about denying medication for kidney disease to an elderly woman or care to a young woman who is 18 weeks—

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

Order. The hon. member for Newton—North Delta has the floor.

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Jinny Sims NDP Newton—North Delta, BC

—or care to a young woman who is 18 weeks pregnant due to a sexual assault. The government is gambling with the health of refugee claimants. This flyer is offensive and misleading. Will the member apologize?

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

3 p.m.

St. Catharines Ontario

Conservative

Rick Dykstra ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, Canadians have been very clear when it comes to interim federal health in this country. They believe that each and every Canadian should be treated exactly the same as anyone applying for refugee status in this country. We have changed the interim federal health. Those who want to become refugees and are applying to do so in this country will receive the medical treatment that each and every other Canadian would, but they should not receive in excess of the treatment that any Canadian would under any provincial health plan.

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Sadia Groguhé NDP Saint-Lambert, QC

Mr. Speaker, let us look at the facts instead of changing the subject.

In the householder sent to her constituents, the hon. member for Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar welcomed the cuts to health services provided to the most vulnerable. What she fails to mention is that health clinics are overcrowded and the cost borne by the provinces is going up. There is absolutely nothing noble about any of that.

When will the government put an end to its devastating cuts to programs for the most vulnerable in our society?

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

3 p.m.

St. Catharines Ontario

Conservative

Rick Dykstra ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, we have made it very clear that across this country, when it comes to health care, when it comes to treatment, when it comes to understanding what it is to become a Canadian in this country, what it is to become a permanent resident, there is a process that will be followed. Those who fall within the rules, those who fall within being a Canadian, becoming a permanent resident or a refugee under the UN, will receive the health care they deserve; but those who come here to take advantage of our country, to take advantage of our system, to take advantage of our process, that is not what this government is going to support.

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Jim Hillyer Conservative Lethbridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are bound together by a rich cultural diversity and by an inspiring history that points us to an even brighter future.

This year, 2012, is the start of the five-year countdown to Canada's 150th birthday in 2017. We have an unprecedented opportunity to celebrate our history and the successes that define us and unite us as Canadians.

Can the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages please tell the House what our government is doing to help Canadians better understand and appreciate our heritage and showcase our legacy to the world?

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam B.C.

Conservative

James Moore ConservativeMinister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, today I was very pleased to be joined by historians and museum leaders from all across Canada to celebrate our government's decision to create the Canadian Museum of History, le Musée canadien de l'histoire.

Canada has an incredibly rich and diverse history. We have stories all across the country that deserve to be told. We are taking the largest museum in all of Canada and we are going to make it even larger, broadening its mandate to include all Canadians so we can tell all of Canada's stories.

John McAvity, who is the executive director of the Canadian Museums Association, said the renaming of this museum is essential. “This is good news.” It will give Canadians greater access to their heritage and to their history.

Supporting Canadian history is what—

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

Order. The hon. member for Saint-Maurice—Champlain.

Official LanguagesOral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Lise St-Denis Liberal Saint-Maurice—Champlain, QC

Mr. Speaker, Commissioner Fraser just released his report. And once again, two areas are problematic: the lack of leadership shown by this government and Air Canada's failure to obey the law.

This is not the first time Air Canada has violated the Official Languages Act. Will the government demonstrate the appropriate leadership and force Air Canada to abide by the Official Languages Act?

Official LanguagesOral Questions

3 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam B.C.

Conservative

James Moore ConservativeMinister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, I completely disagree with the premise of the question.

At the beginning of her question, the member said there was a lack of leadership. In reality, however, the report of the Commissioner of Official Languages reads as follows:

The Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008-2013...[our investment policy for official languages] recognizes the importance of increasing the level of bilingualism among young Canadians and sets out federal investments.... These programs are working.

It is working; we are getting results. We will continue to protect and promote both of Canada's official languages.

Canada PostOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Robert Aubin NDP Trois-Rivières, QC

Mr. Speaker, the situation at Canada Post has been getting worse and worse since the Conservatives came to power. As solutions they offer nothing better than reducing post office business hours and making cuts to services in rural areas.

The ship is sinking, and all the Conservatives are doing is taking an axe to the hull. Canadians and Quebeckers no longer recognize the postal service they loved.

Does the minister have a development plan for Canada Post, or is his solution still to close more offices?

Canada PostOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia Manitoba

Conservative

Steven Fletcher ConservativeMinister of State (Transport)

Mr. Speaker, I take exception to everything the member just said. The government has been watching Canada Post, which is an arm's-length corporation, and proceeding with a transformational $2 billion investment to get it into the 21st century.

I would like to remind members and Canadians that the opposition party blocked the attempt of the government to get the mail to Canadians. By the way, mail would cost a lot more with a carbon tax.