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House of Commons Hansard #10 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was infrastructure.

Topics

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

It being Wednesday, we will now have the singing of the national anthem, led by the hon. member for Portage—Lisgar.

[Members sang the national anthem]

Maurice StrongStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Green

Elizabeth May Green Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, later this afternoon there will be a celebration of life, just across the street from here, remembering and celebrating the extraordinary litany of accomplishments of Maurice Strong.

Maurice was born in 1929 in the little town of Oak Lake, Manitoba, and grew up in the Prairies through the dirty thirties. I do not need to describe the hardships that his small and enduring family suffered at that time. He never got beyond high school, but a small scrap of paper came to him across the prairies, landed at his feet, and he read it. It was about the United Nations, and he decided, extraordinarily, that his path to be of service to the world would be to become a self-made millionaire and to put his talents to work for the world.

He was the UN secretary-general of two global conferences. He was the founder of CIDA and the United Nations environment program, and he set up the Earth Charter Commission.

We celebrate an extraordinary Canadian, a global citizen. May he rest in peace.

Allan MacDonaldStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Liberal Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, I stand to pay tribute to Allan MacDonald from Nine Mile Creek, P.E.I., who recently passed away.

Mr. MacDonald, at 87, was married to his beloved Mary for 67 years. They were the happy and dedicated parents of eight children.

He fished the waters of Northumberland Strait for some 60 years. Serving on many fisheries organizations, including the P.E.I. Fishermen's Association, he was awarded for fighting for the issues of island, Canadian, and international fishermen. Allan was instrumental in changing the design of the Confederation Bridge pillars to include ice shields, thereby breaking ice flows and creating less impact on the fisheries, a design noted in National Geographic.

An active community member, he volunteered all his life, including supporting the Liberal cause provincially and federally. Serving his community and family with dedication, Allan was trusted, faithful, and hard working.

We offer condolences to his family and our thanks for Allan's life's work.

Parry Sound—MuskokaStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Tony Clement Conservative Parry Sound—Muskoka, ON

Mr. Speaker, in my first member's statement, I am saluting my tremendous riding of Parry Sound—Muskoka, and in particular, all of its volunteers and supporters of charity.

My community is a generous one, and I want to highlight some outstanding examples, starting with the pride of Parry Sound, Bobbie Orr, who has announced that in May, he will be hosting an evening recognizing young community leaders and the contributions of youth sport.

In Huntsville, Chris and George Gilley have donated $250,000 to the Huntsville Hospital Foundation, earmarked for the chemotherapy clinic.

Brock and Willa Napier, from Minett, have donated $500,000 to the South Muskoka Hospital Foundation. The Napiers have also donated $750,000 toward a wellness centre in Port Carling.

Burk's Falls Winterfest was held this month and celebrated village mascot Pete the Bear, played lovingly by Ken McIntyre for the 20th consecutive winter.

In December, the Muskoka Parry Sound Hockey League raised close to $2,000 toward a bursary fund.

These are but a few examples of the generous nature of the people of Parry Sound—Muskoka. I am so proud to be their member of Parliament.

Marcel BarbeauStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Ginette Petitpas Taylor Liberal Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, NB

Mr. Speaker, I am saddened today to note the passing of one of our great artists, Marcel Barbeau, who died on January 2 at the age of 90. A renowned painter and sculptor and an Officer of the Order of Canada, Mr. Barbeau was a pioneer in the field of abstract art in Canada. He signed the Refus global, a call for greater freedom of expression.

His works are in many private collections and appear in public galleries and museums around the world, including the National Gallery of Canada. Artist express the very essence, the soul of our society.

Mr. Barbeau was an important voice for us all. He helped us see who we are and what we can become.

International Holocaust Remembrance DayStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Rachel Blaney NDP North Island—Powell River, BC

Mr. Speaker, today I stand in recognition of the International Day of Commemoration in memory of the victims of the Holocaust.

On January 27, 1945, soldiers of the Soviet Union's army of the First Ukrainian Front opened the gates and liberated the prisoners of the Auschwitz and Birkenau death camps. It is important that today, 71 years later, we remember. For the dead and the living, we must bear witness.

As Elie Wiesel said, today we bear witness to six million Jews, a third of the Jewish population, who were killed alongside countless others due to their race, religion, ethnicity, or sexual orientation. As Canadians, we must bear witness and demonstrate action against racial, ethnic, and religious intolerance. Canada has been profoundly shaped by the 40,000 Holocaust survivors who settled in this country after the war. We must not forget this history. We must teach our children about the victims of the Holocaust and continue to fight all forms of discrimination.

We must never forget.

Family Literacy DayStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Randy Boissonnault Liberal Edmonton Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, as the founding chair of the Centre for Family Literacy, which is located in my riding of Edmonton Centre, I rise to bring attention to national Family Literacy Day.

Research demonstrates that the birthplace of literacy is in the home and that parents and family members are a child's first and best teachers. We recognize the foundational work of family literacy practitioners across the country and thank them for helping to make families healthier and happier through literacy.

Family Literacy Day is held on January 27 every year to raise awareness of the importance of reading and engaging in other literacy-related activities as a family. Literacy is the essential link between potential and opportunities, and families are vital to the acquisition of reading and writing skills.

Mr. Speaker, I invite you to celebrate Family Literacy Day with me and my colleagues.

International AdoptionsStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Michael Cooper Conservative St. Albert—Edmonton, AB

Mr. Speaker, Wendy Malanchan, of St. Albert, Alberta, has waited more than three years to bring her adopted daughter, Lajoie, home to Canada from the Democratic Republic of Congo. The only thing holding this up is that the DRC has refused to issue an exit visa for little Lajoie.

Lajoie is not alone. Indeed, there are some 16 children adopted by Canadian families waiting for exit visas. Now there is legislation before the Congolese parliament that could force these families to wait years longer. Time is of the essence.

I respectfully urge the Prime Minister to pick up the phone, call President Kabila, and ask for 16 exit visas.

Public ServiceStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Darshan Singh Kang Liberal Calgary Skyview, AB

Mr. Speaker, since this is my first time rising to speak in the House, I give my sincere thanks to the constituents of Calgary Skyview for electing me as their voice in Ottawa.

I want to acknowledge the dedication to public service of Shelley Wark-Martyn, who started her career as a social worker and a registered nurse. She entered politics as a member of provincial parliament for Ontario and served as the revenue minister from 1990 to 1993. In 1997 she continued in politics by being elected to Thunder Bay city council, and from 2014 to 2015, she was the president of the Alberta Liberal Party.

Her continued contributions are to be commended, as she worked with the National Women's Liberal Commission to encourage all Canadians to become equal partners and active citizens in our country's democratic process. Her dedication to public service stands as an inspiration and example for us all.

Family Literacy DayStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Darrell Samson Liberal Sackville—Preston—Chezzetcook, NS

Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to rise in the House today to mark Family Literacy Day.

Because of my background in education, I know that many Canadians across the country have a very hard time finding a job or position that pays a decent wage.

In Nova Scotia, approximately 38% of the population has problems reading and writing and must take adult literacy courses.

A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to work with the executive director of Literacy Nova Scotia to prepare for the delivery of hundreds of books to communities all across my riding and Nova Scotia.

In closing, I urge all parents to set aside 15 minutes every day to read to their children. It can make a huge difference in the lives of those children.

Lucie LauzierStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Gérard Deltell Conservative Louis-Saint-Laurent, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am honoured and proud to represent the constituents of Louis-Saint-Laurent here in the House.

The Wendake first nation is at the heart of my riding. We also have the town of L'Ancienne-Lorette, and the city wards of Val-Bélair, Lebourgneuf, Neufchâtel, and Loretteville.

Allow me to pay special tribute to Lucie Lauzier, a 91-year-old woman from Loretteville, who has done volunteer work for 55 years, helping thousands of people. She has spent her entire life collecting food and clothing to give to the least fortunate among us, in order to lend them a hand.

Mrs. Lauzier started her charity work at her home and her efforts were so successful that she eventually opened the La Luciole charity centre. Today, however, her health is preventing her from carrying on her work and La Luciole has to close its doors.

I must say that Lucie Lauzier is truly an example of determination and success for all Canadians.

Thank you, Mrs. Lauzier.

HealthStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Liberal Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, on this Bell “Let's Talk Day”, I rise to pay tribute to an exceptional young lady from my riding, Becky Hanna, a happy kid with great friends, an excellent student at Cape Breton University, and a varsity athlete.

She had a great life going on except for one thing: bulimia nervosa. It was a severe disorder that she hid from her family and friends for a year, a compulsion that was more of an addiction that yielded a binge then purge cycle that she could not stop no matter how hard she tried.

Some days Becky would purge once or twice, but other days it would be seven or eight times, taking a heavy toll on her body and a heavier one on her mind.

Becky realized she was not alone and her condition was not uncommon. With the support of her family and friends, she works every day to confront her demons.

On Becky's behalf, I ask the House to visit Becky Hanna's Facebook page and share her video with family and friends. On behalf of all parliamentarians, let me commend and thank this exceptional young lady for sharing her important message.

HealthStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Hedy Fry Liberal Vancouver Centre, BC

Mr. Speaker, this is Alzheimer's Awareness Month.

Alzheimer's disease has been called one of the most significant social and health crises of the 21st century. A recent Nanos survey shows that 47% of Canadians think it is not possible to live with this disease because of the stigma. Advances in treatment have improved the quality of life, but this is not enough.

Some 500,000 Canadians live with Alzheimer's or related diseases. This will double within a generation. Dementia costs the Canadian economy $15 billion each year and by 2038 this will rise to $153 billion. Alzheimer's disease puts families under great emotional stress every year.

Early signs of Alzheimer's include loss of memory, misplacing things, changes in personality and mood, disorientation of time, loss of initiative, and difficulty performing tasks.

There is an urgent need for investment in research toward early diagnosis and cure. Early identification of the risk of Alzheimer's is critical in delaying onset.

HolocaustStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Garnett Genuis Conservative Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, AB

Mr. Speaker, today is Holocaust Memorial Day, a day when we remember the six million Jews and many others who were killed by the Nazis.

Many of my relatives were among the victims. My grandmother, a half-Jew living in Germany at the time, survived but not without suffering the loss of her grandparents, cousins, and many friends.

My relatives could have left Germany earlier, but stayed behind because they did not believe that such unspeakable evil was possible in their civilized society.

As uncomfortable as it may be, the Holocaust forces us to contemplate evil and how we respond to it. We must never be afraid to call evil what it is. When we say, “Never again”, it is time we mean it.

Fighting evil had a cost in World War II and it has a cost today. My grandmother was always grateful that Canada was prepared to pay the cost in her time.

Let us be firm in our resolve when we say, “Never again”.

RefugeesStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Karina Gould Liberal Burlington, ON

Mr. Speaker, this is my first member's statement and I would like to thank the people of Burlington for their support this past October.

I would like to take this opportunity to recognize two individuals in my riding of Burlington who have recently inspired me with their kindness and generosity.

Norine Hider, who is 91 years young, took our Governor General's urging for a warm Canadian welcome during a cold Canadian winter for Syrian refugees to heart. Ms. Hider collected 275 sweaters through her sweaters for Syrians initiative.

Another resident, Olivia Walker-Edwards, a grade nine student at Blyth Academy, had the idea to organize a five kilometre walk to raise funds to help a Syrian family settle in Burlington. Olivia's Walk for Refugees raised over $3,000 for the Burlington downtown refugee alliance.

I know these are just two examples of the kinds of thoughtful efforts Canadians are organizing in their own communities to help those in need.

I wish to thank Noreen and Olivia and all Canadians who are contributing however they can to ensure these refugees truly experience a warm Canadian welcome.

BanknotesStatements By Members

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Sheila Malcolmson NDP Nanaimo—Ladysmith, BC

Mr. Speaker, as the member of Parliament for Nanaimo—Ladysmith and the NDP critic for Status of Women, I stand with 72,000 petitioners across Canada who call on the government to do the right thing and put the image of Canadian women on banknotes.

The Famous Five and Thérèse Casgrain, women who advocated for the right to vote, used to be on one of our currencies. The Conservative government removed them in favour of an icebreaker.

Last year, my NDP colleagues asked the government to do the right thing and recognize the role that Canadian women have played in building our country and contributing to our history.

Two weeks ago, I asked the new government to do the right thing and indications in the media were that the finance minister is open-minded on the topic.

I urge all members of the House to do whatever they can to support recognizing the important role Canadian women.

The EconomyStatements By Members

2:25 p.m.

Conservative

Rachael Harder Conservative Lethbridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, Alberta has not seen job losses as it does today since 1982. Over 100,000 jobs have disappeared.

Over the Christmas holiday I had the opportunity and the privilege to talk with many Albertans in my riding. It was made very clear to me that people are concerned about their present and their future.

National pipeline projects are stalled because the Liberal government does not believe in Canada's energy sector.

The Prime Minister promised Canadian young people a vibrant future and meaningful employment. However, as far as the government is concerned, right now we are seeing one of the worst layoffs this country has ever seen.

This is gutting the middle class, causing families to lose their homes, their livelihoods and hope for their future. Each day that these pipelines are delayed the Canadian economy loses out on $50 million.

On behalf of all Canadians, I urge the Prime Minister to put down his selfie stick and get to work building these pipelines.

International Holocaust Remembrance DayStatements By Members

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Michael Levitt Liberal York Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, today is International Holocaust Remembrance Day and the 71st anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau.

Every year we must continue to remember and reflect on one of history's darkest periods: the systematic, state-sponsored murder of six million Jews during the second world war.

Each year there are fewer survivors to pass on their stories and remind us of the value of human life. Their stories show the need for tolerance and compassion and the price we pay for ignoring injustice and hatred.

We bear a collective responsibility to keep these stories alive by continuing to educate others about the Holocaust and the evil that fuelled this attempt to exterminate an entire people.

In the aftermath of the Holocaust, the world came together and declared, “Never again”. On this day and every day we must give special meaning to those words by actively standing up against hate, injustice, anti-Semitism and racism, and refusing to be silent in the face of genocide.

The EconomyOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Sturgeon River—Parkland Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, yesterday Statistics Canada said that Alberta has lost more jobs than in any year since 1982. Many Albertans do not know where the next paycheque will come from. They are worried about how they will put food on the table or a roof over their heads. Families without work are not feeling refreshed or happy, like the minister for Calgary said yesterday.

How can the Liberal government be so out of touch with Alberta workers and their families?

The EconomyOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian government is very preoccupied with the fate of Albertans and the fact that there are massive layoffs and they need support. We are looking to partner with Alberta and with municipalities across the country facing very real challenges. We look forward to putting forward a historic plan to invest in infrastructure to create growth and to support the middle class in this country as will be presented by the finance minister in his upcoming budget.

The EconomyOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Sturgeon River—Parkland Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the numbers explain the despair felt by workers in the resource sector across the country.

Families without work are not feeling refreshed or happy, like the Liberal minister for Calgary said. If the value of our home drops every day, we do not feel refreshed or happy, whether we live in Alberta, New Brunswick, or Quebec.

Why is the Prime Minister refusing to take action and to tell workers that he will work on creating new jobs?

The EconomyOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, that is exactly what we are going to do.

People voted for us because in our campaign we promised to invest in communities, create growth for the middle class and help Canadians create opportunities across the country.

We are very concerned about the people of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Labrador and Newfoundland, who have been seriously affected by the price of oil. We will be there to help them and all Canadians with our upcoming budget.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

January 27th, 2016 / 2:30 p.m.

Sturgeon River—Parkland Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, Iran's supreme leader consistently calls for the destruction of Israel. The Iranian regime is one of the world's worst abusers of human rights, yet the Liberals say they will be lifting Canadian sanctions on Iran, and why? According to the foreign affairs minister it would be in accordance with our allies, but our allies have also been clear that Canada should leave our CF-18s in the fight against ISIS.

The question for the Prime Minister is this: When do our allies matter and when do they not?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, there is no question that the world is now a safer place because of the P5+1 deal with Iran. We will continue to work alongside our allies to ensure security in the world and to engage with Iran in a responsible way that highlights both the human rights abuses at home and its sponsorship of terrorism abroad. We need to engage in a respectful, responsible way, and we will do exactly that.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Tony Clement Conservative Parry Sound—Muskoka, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal plan to abandon sanctions against Iran overturns a principled stand.

Iran is committing horrible human rights violations against its own people, particularly women and religious minorities. What is more, it supports terrorism and regularly talks about the destruction of Israel.

Why is the government giving Iran a free pass and compromising Canadian values?