House of Commons Hansard #141 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was crisis.

Topics

Justice
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Sylvie Boucher Beauport—Côte-de-Beaupré—Île d’Orléans—Charlevoix, QC

Mr. Speaker, last fall the Minister of Justice pledged to fill 60 judicial vacancies in Canada in order to address the issue of inordinate court delays. Since then, only 24 positions have been filled, which is clearly not enough and has led to trials being dropped, including trials involving such serious offences as murder and rape.

When will the Minister of Justice finally keep her promise and show consideration and respect for the victims and their families?

Justice
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Vancouver Granville
B.C.

Liberal

Jody Wilson-Raybould Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I again rise to speak about the comprehensive review of the criminal justice system that we are undertaking. I am very proud of the judicial appointments I have made, and will continue to make, under a reconstituted judicial appointments process to ensure that we appoint the highest quality of jurists who reflect the diversity of the country. This will, in turn, assist with delays in our courts, but I will point out that it is not simply judges who lead to delays. The administration of justice is a provincial and territorial responsibility, and I am committed to continuing to work in concert with my colleagues to address delays in the—

Justice
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Geoff Regan

The hon. member for Hull—Aylmer.

Science
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Greg Fergus Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, our government is committed to supporting science and funding partnerships that lead to discoveries and the products of tomorrow. Today I was at my alma mater, the University of Ottawa, looking at research that, once achieved, will change the lives of Canadians by allowing everyday objects to become smart.

Can the Minister of Science inform the House of the strategic investments made by our government to ensure that we support scientists and encourage innovation and a strong middle class?

Science
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Etobicoke North
Ontario

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Minister of Science

Mr. Speaker, our government is committed to supporting scientific research, both basic and applied.

Today I announced over $50 million for projects in NSERC's strategic partnerships, which cross-connect companies with scientists who are advancing research in areas where Canada is a world leader. From the water we drink, to the air we breathe, to new technologies, support for science will help build a better future for Canadians.

Public Services and Procurement
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Alupa Clarke Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, my riding is home to 200 public servants who work for the Canada Revenue Agency. These public servants work very hard for Canadians and their families, and, as one can well imagine, they have bills to pay. For the past year, the Phoenix fiasco has been hitting them hard. They cannot even get basic updates about their cases. What are they doing now? They are coming to my riding office to get help that the government should be giving them but is not.

When will the minister at the very least admit that she made a mistake in February 2016 when she gave the system the green light despite advice to the contrary?

Public Services and Procurement
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Bonavista—Burin—Trinity
Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Judy Foote Minister of Public Services and Procurement

Mr. Speaker, while the government's payroll system ensures that 300,000 employees get paid every two weeks, there are public service employees who are experiencing pay difficulties in some categories, and that is totally unacceptable. That is why we have taken additional measures by putting in satellite pay offices to help those employees. We encourage them to reach out to us. In fact, the most recent office we put in was in Kingston. We are working really hard on behalf of our employees.

The Environment
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Wayne Stetski Kootenay—Columbia, BC

Mr. Speaker, both Conservative and Liberal governments have downloaded responsibility for Saskatchewan's environmentally critical grasslands without any concern for their future. These grasslands are unique ecological heritage sites. They act as important carbon sinks and are home to rare and threatened species. Now the government is considering giving away the last of these grasslands in southwestern Saskatchewan and ending the environmental protection they receive.

Will the Minister of Environment and Climate Change commit today to create a new national wildlife area to preserve these ecosystems for future generations?

The Environment
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Ottawa Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Catherine McKenna Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Mr. Speaker, I take very seriously the obligation to protect our natural environment. I am committed to working with the member on this issue to find a resolution.

Health
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Randy Boissonnault Edmonton Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, Jordan's principle was established in response to the death of Jordan River Anderson, a five-year-old member of Norway House First Nation in Manitoba.

This principle seeks to resolve jurisdictional disputes so that first nations children can receive the care they need, when the need it. For a renewed nation-to-nation relationship, we must ensure that there is timely access to care in my province of Alberta and across Canada.

Can the Minister of Health inform this chamber on the measures she is taking to ensure that our government fully implements Jordan's principle?

Health
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Markham—Stouffville
Ontario

Liberal

Jane Philpott Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Edmonton Centre for this question.

Yesterday, our government announced that it is giving $5 million to Alberta's new First Nations Health Consortium for enhanced service coordination for first nations children in that province. According to its president, Tyler White, the consortium will eliminate many of the barriers faced every day by first nations peoples.

This initiative together with others shows that our government is fully implementing Jordan's principle.

Democratic Reform
Oral Questions

February 15th, 2017 / 3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Scott Reid Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Democratic Institutions' mandate letter was made public on February 1, so it is curious that the minister continues to be evasive about answering apparently innocuous questions about the date on which she received the mandate letter. One possible explanation might be that she does not want to admit that on January 31, she was telling stakeholders that the government was still open to changes to the electoral system, when in fact, the decision to betray this promise was already known to her. After all, a week before her mandate letter was made public, she was in cabinet arguing passionately, we are told, thanks to the Prime Minister's leak on this subject, against a referendum on electoral reform.

When did she get that mandate letter?

Democratic Reform
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Burlington
Ontario

Liberal

Karina Gould Minister of Democratic Institutions

Mr. Speaker, as my mandate letter was made public on February 1, as it was to all Canadians that day, I was pleased to give a press conference on it at that time. I reached out to stakeholders the day before, because as Minister of Democratic Institutions, I believe it is important to engage with Canadians on all sides of the political spectrum. I continue to do that, and I will continue to do that moving forward. I look forward to implementing this mandate and to working with everyone in the House.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Green

Elizabeth May Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, three years ago in this place, we passed something called Lindsey's law, an act to create a DNA database for missing persons. It is named Lindsey's law out of respect for a missing person. Her name is Lindsey Nicholls. Her mom is a friend of mine. She is a constituent. Judy Peterson fought like a tiger to get something that would allow law enforcement to compare the DNA at crime scenes with missing persons. That bill was passed, but it was delayed and would not come into effect until 2017. Now Judy Peterson has been told that there is an additional year's delay.

Can the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness tell us if he can stop there being a delay and bring it into force?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Regina—Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, we all share the pain of those whose loved ones have gone missing, and we strongly support efforts to help law enforcement with missing persons investigations. This includes the creation of the DNA-based missing persons and victims data bank. We are in the final stages now of doing the necessary due diligence, both with respect to cost sharing and privacy protection. My goal is to have this system up and running before the end of this year.