House of Commons Hansard #143 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was cbc.

Topics

Justice
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Michael Cooper St. Albert—Edmonton, AB

Madam Speaker, last fall, Travis Vader's conviction of two counts of second degree murder of Lyle and Marie McCann was vacated after the trial judge based his conviction on a zombie section of the Criminal Code.

Zombie laws are booby traps for the unwitting, with the potential for costs, delays, mistrials, appeals, and like what happened to the McCann family, miscarriages of justice.

The Minister of Justice can easily introduce legislation to repeal these sections. When will she?

Justice
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Liberal

Marco Mendicino Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Madam Speaker, I want to begin by reiterating that our government extends deepest sympathies to the family of the deceased.

The reference to a zombie provision, as my colleague puts it, is a stark reminder about the importance of conducting a broad, comprehensive review of the criminal justice system.

Our government is undertaking that process. We look forward to working with my hon. colleague across the way to ensure that we have a fair, relevant, and accessible criminal justice system.

Justice
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Marilyn Gladu Sarnia—Lambton, ON

Madam Speaker, the Justice Department has launched an initiative called “Transparency for the 21st Century”.

Canadians are interested to see how that goes, since there has been a total lack of transparency from the Minister of Justice.

She will not tell Canadians which mandatory minimum sentences she will get rid of . She will not tell Canadians why over half of the judicial positions she was supposed to fill are still empty, leading to murderers and sex offenders going free.

When will she tell Canadians which mandatory sentences will be eliminated and why she has not filled the judicial vacancies?

Justice
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Liberal

Marco Mendicino Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Madam Speaker, I want to begin by saying that we all acknowledge that child sexual assault crimes are wrong, and we are doing everything in our power to prevent them from occurring again.

Our government firmly believes that mandatory minimum sentences are appropriate for the most serious offences. It is also clear that the last government introduced a number of mandatory minimums which have been systematically struck down by the Supreme Court of Canada, and that is why we must take a careful look at mandatory minimums going forward.

Our government is committed to doing that so that we have an efficient, fair, accessible criminal justice system.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Len Webber Calgary Confederation, AB

Madam Speaker, my friend, Neil Bantleman, faces 11 years behind bars in Indonesia. Indonesia's justice system has accused him of a crime that is unfounded and unwarranted. A year ago, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs claimed that he was “deeply concerned and dismayed” by the court's decision. Since then nothing, and Neil continues to languish in prison.

Why will the minister not give Neil, his family and friends, hope, and outline what action she is taking to bring Neil home?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

February 17th, 2017 / 11:50 a.m.

Mississauga Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Omar Alghabra Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs (Consular Affairs)

Madam Speaker, I want to thank my hon. colleague for his question and his ongoing work on behalf of Neil Bantleman. It is our government's priority to see Neil Bantleman back home in Canada as a free man. Our government has reiterated that concern with the Indonesian government at the highest level.

Our officials and myself have been engaged with this family. We have been working with his legal team and his family throughout this judicial review process. I want to take a moment to recognize the strength of his family and his friends, and particularly his wife Tracy, for her courage and her strength.

Persons with Disabilities
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Pam Damoff Oakville North—Burlington, ON

Madam Speaker, recently I held a round table in my riding of Oakville North—Burlington about the challenges faced by people living with disabilities.

I commend them for their courage and determination.

The challenges related to accessibility and inclusion in workplaces and in our community are many. We have to change our perceptions and make Canada more inclusive.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary for Sport and Persons with Disabilities tell us about our government's efforts to ensure better inclusion?

Persons with Disabilities
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Lauzon Parliamentary Secretary for Sport and Persons with Disabilities

Madam Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague from Oakville North—Burlington for her question.

Our government is committed to ensuring better accessibility for Canadians with disabilities and better opportunities in their communities and their workplaces from coast to coast to coast. Many Canadians have already participated in one of the 19 public consultation sessions, in addition to the consultations held by their MPs. The public portion of the consultation is now complete.

I encourage all those who have not yet participated to do so online at Canada.ca/Accessible-Canada by February 28.

Better is always possible.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Bernard Généreux Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, QC

Madam Speaker, the Liberal government remains out of touch with the realities of the forestry industry and the regions of Quebec.

It is urgent that the government negotiate a softwood lumber agreement and put an end to the uncertainty surrounding the woodland caribou. Unfortunately, the government does not have enough information to make informed decisions on this issue.

The Minister of Environment likes to claim that her decisions are based on science. Will she make sure that her department learns more about the woodland caribou so that an informed decision can be made without giving in to the blackmail of activists?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Ottawa Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Catherine McKenna Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Madam Speaker, I am very pleased to inform my colleague that I will be meeting with my provincial counterparts, including my Quebec counterpart, on Tuesday. We are going to talk about the woodland caribou, science, and how we can protect this species. We are also aware of the employment issue.

Canadian Heritage
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Chandra Arya Nepean, ON

Madam Speaker, my constituents often tell me how important it is to have access to arts facilities in our communities. This allows families to take part in the arts and better understand our stories as Canadians.

Will the government please share with us how it plans on supporting these important staples of our communities?

Canadian Heritage
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Ahuntsic-Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Mélanie Joly Minister of Canadian Heritage

Madam Speaker, our government firmly believes in investing in our cultural sector, as it drives innovation and growth and allows for unique Canadian stories to be shared with the world.

In budget 2016, we invested nearly $170 million over two years in cultural infrastructure. That is a historic amount for arts and culture.

In fact, just this morning, we announced over $6.5 million in funding for Arts Court and the Ottawa Art Gallery right here in Ottawa. This will help to provide a home for 26 not-for-profit organizations to allow them to continue to support our Canadian creators.

Canada Revenue Agency
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Ziad Aboultaif Edmonton Manning, AB

Madam Speaker, Canadians expect all taxpayers to pay what they owe. They do not want anyone to give them preferential treatment.

Could the Minister of National Revenue explain why, after allocating $444 million to combat offshore tax evasion, we are told that her department is failing to collect $50 billion each year. Wow, $50 billion would be enough for the Liberal budget to balance itself.

Canada Revenue Agency
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Gaspésie—Les-Îles-de-la-Madeleine
Québec

Liberal

Diane Lebouthillier Minister of National Revenue

Madam Speaker, Canada's middle class and those working hard to join it pay their taxes and fund programs for all Canadians, but they have had enough of those taxpayers who do not pay their fair share.

We have invested $444 million in order to prevent tax evasion and tax avoidance. We are working very hard. Before long, I will have the great pleasure to give my colleague opposite some good news.

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Gabriel Ste-Marie Joliette, QC

Madam Speaker, when Ottawa insists on approving infrastructure projects one at a time, everything grinds to a halt and we never get a single penny.

The parliamentary budget officer has confirmed that, of the $13.6 billion announced in the budget, only one-third has been spent. In Quebec, things are twice as bad.

Will the government keep its election promise to transfer all uncommitted funds to the gas tax fund to make sure, according to its platform, that “our communities are not shortchanged”?