House of Commons Hansard #133 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was ceta.

Topics

Public SafetyOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has been very clear. Canadians expect this government to do two things equally well, first, to develop a good working relationship with our largest trading partner, and, second, to safeguard the values, the rights, and the privileges of Canadians. We will do both.

EthicsOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Conservative

John Brassard Conservative Barrie—Innisfil, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is currently under investigation by the Ethics Commissioner after promising to set a new ethical standard, proving once again that it is ingrained in the Liberal DNA that government is not for the people, it is for Liberal friends and insiders.

This week, they defended a $15,000 gift to their friends at Liberal Party think tank, Canada 2020, as an arm's-length decision. Well, the President of the Treasury Board is not arm's length, and he gave them $22,000.

Why will the Prime Minister not just stop giving taxpayer funding to Canada 2020?

EthicsOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Etobicoke North Ontario

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan LiberalMinister of Science

Mr. Speaker, our government values science, scientists, and the important work they do.

As I have said before, the granting council is an arm's-length organization. It is able to issue contracts below a certain amount. The contract was below that threshold, and the granting council took a decision.

EthicsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

John Brassard Conservative Barrie—Innisfil, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals keep trying to defend the Prime Minister's law-breaking getaway and ride on a private aircraft over New Year's as a trip to visit a long-time family friend.

I will remind those who continue to defend it as such that the Ethics Commissioner has already warned a Liberal minister that he is not to have any dealings with a particular long-time family friend because of the potential conflict of interest that it could create.

My question is a simple one. Would the Prime Minister explain why the same rules do not apply to him?

EthicsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism

Mr. Speaker, the member knows very well that this government will work very hard for Canadians. This government will continue to invest in communities to help create the conditions for growth for good jobs for Canadians to support their families.

When it comes to the member's question, the member knows very well that the Prime Minister has stated he will answer any questions that the commissioner has. We will continue to work with all offices of this place.

EthicsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Conservative Lévis—Lotbinière, QC

Mr. Speaker, at a time when thousands of Canadians are looking for work because the Prime Minister is not committed to the economy and job creation, we know someone who will never be unemployed. The Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner has not been this busy since the sponsorship scandal. What both scandals coincidentally have in common is that they took place while the Liberal Party of Canada was in power.

If the Prime Minister will not put a stop to this government's elastic ethics, then who will?

EthicsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism

Mr. Speaker, as was already mentioned, the Prime Minister will answer all of the commissioner's questions.

EthicsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Luc Berthold Conservative Mégantic—L'Érable, QC

Mr. Speaker, as you know, the more an elastic is stretched, the more likely it is to snap. That is exactly what the Prime Minister is doing when it comes to ethics: fundraisers with Chinese millionaires, private helicopter rides over the holidays, and paying his friends at Canada 2020.

As the member for Beaches—East York did yesterday, will the other Liberal members have the courage to stand up and speak out against the Prime Minister's elastic ethics before everything snaps in their faces?

EthicsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism

Mr. Speaker, the member is confusing things, which we should be careful to not do here. We are here to work on behalf of Canadians, and that is what this government will continue to do. The Prime Minister has said that he will answer the commissioner's questions. We will continue working hard for all Canadians.

Status of WomenOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Sheila Malcolmson NDP Nanaimo—Ladysmith, BC

Mr. Speaker, 50 years ago today, the Royal Commission on the Status of Women exposed widespread discrimination against women. Fifty years later, that promise of equality is still not realized.

Liberal and Conservative governments have ignored the commission's recommendations and cut social programs for women. The result is that since 1995, Canada has fallen from first on the gender equality list of the UN to 25th. Still, Liberals delay pay equity legislation.

How long with the government fail to rectify 50 years of inequality?

Status of WomenOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Cape Breton—Canso Nova Scotia

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Employment

Mr. Speaker, equal pay for equal value work is a human right. We are very proud to bring forward pay equity after a decade of inaction. Pay equity between men and women and fair treatment for all workers in the workplace, regardless of gender, is going to create growth for a thriving middle class. We will make substantive reform and implement proactive pay equity in the federal jurisdiction, which includes 874,000 employees and 10,800 employers.

We are absolutely committed to pay equity, and we will pursue that and bring it to a—

Status of WomenOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

TaxationOral Questions

February 3rd, 2017 / 11:40 a.m.

NDP

Guy Caron NDP Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, as you are no doubt aware, nearly 75% of Canadians who own small businesses, family farms, and fishing boats want to transfer their business and retire within the next 10 years. However, they face a serious problem if they want to keep their business in the family.

The problem is that, by selling their business to their children, they will have to pay a lot more in taxes than if they were to sell it to strangers. My bill, Bill C-274, seeks to correct this injustice. It has the support of over 120 municipalities, chambers of commerce, and farmer and fisher associations.

Can the government confirm that it will let its members vote freely and according to the will of their constituents?

TaxationOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe New Brunswick

Liberal

Ginette Petitpas Taylor LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his question.

Bill C-274 would weaken two anti-avoidance rules that have been part of the Income Tax Act for a long time. The government is concerned about the changes, which would increase opportunities for unfair tax avoidance. Bill C-274 would offer a targeted tax advantage to a specific group of taxpayers rather than to the middle class as a whole.

Public SafetyOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Alaina Lockhart Liberal Fundy Royal, NB

Mr. Speaker, many New Brunswickers are still recovering from the ice storm that struck our province last week and knocked out power for thousands of people. We are grateful for the tireless efforts of the municipal and provincial first responders and recovery crews, as well as countless volunteers.

Can the Minister of National Defence tell us how the Canadian Armed Forces have been helping the region since Monday?

Public SafetyOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Saint-Jean Québec

Liberal

Jean Rioux LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, first, I would like to commend the people of New Brunswick for their courage, their generosity, their great desire to help one another, and their community solidarity.

The federal government took action as soon as it received the call. The Province's initial request for aid was approved in 17 minutes, and troops arrived in New Brunswick the next day. In four days, our soldiers visited 4,500 homes. They distributed food and water. They cleared debris and helped things get back to normal faster. The presence of the armed forces made a real difference and brought peace and comfort to people in a very stressful situation.

TaxationOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Marilyn Gladu Conservative Sarnia—Lambton, ON

Mr. Speaker, make no mistake, the Liberal cash grabs are making things so much worse for hard-working Canadians. The Liberal carbon tax will not just make gas, heating, and everything we purchase more expensive, it will also make businesses in Canada less competitive.

My riding is in danger of losing 5,000 jobs to the U.S., which would devastate our region. The U.S. is Canada's biggest customer and biggest competitor.

When will the Liberals protect Canadian jobs and can the carbon tax?

TaxationOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Ottawa Centre Ontario

Liberal

Catherine McKenna LiberalMinister of Environment and Climate Change

Mr. Speaker, unlike the party opposite, we understand that the environment and the economy go together.

We are very proud that we were able to come to an agreement with the provinces, territories, and indigenous leaders to develop a pan-Canadian plan that will grow our economy, create goods jobs, and ensure we have a more sustainable future for our children.

EmploymentOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Karen Vecchio Conservative Elgin—Middlesex—London, ON

Mr. Speaker, just two years ago while visiting London, the Prime Minister said he wants Canada to move away from manufacturing jobs. As a reminder, he said this in one of the regions where Canadians' livelihoods rely mostly on manufacturing jobs, like Elgin—Middlesex—London.

The Prime Minister is repeating the same mistakes of Ontario's Green Energy Act, which has caused hydro rates to skyrocket and businesses to shut down and leave Ontario.

Why does the Prime Minister insist on killing jobs and raising costs for hard-working Canadians?

EmploymentOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

LaSalle—Émard—Verdun Québec

Liberal

David Lametti LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Innovation

Mr. Speaker, once again, nothing could be further from the truth.

We are committed to the manufacturing sector. It is the cornerstone of our economy. It employs close to 1.7 million Canadians and accounts for more than 10% of our gross domestic product. We are investing in various sectors, including automotive, aerospace, life sciences, digital technology, and agrifood.

I can point out to the hon. member that we have invested $15 million in Hanwha L&C Canada in the London—Fanshawe riding to expand production and to manufacture a new line of high-quality stone slabs. That is 85 new jobs.

Small BusinessOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Blake Richards Conservative Banff—Airdrie, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals ended the review of rules that would ensure small businesses like campgrounds would have access to the small business tax rate. Yet, when I asked the revenue minister about it, she claimed that Liberals had not changed the tax rules. However, just a few months ago, her department did in fact change the interpretation of those very rules.

Because of this new interpretation, thousands of campgrounds will be hit with huge new tax bills. So when the minister answered my question, was she misleading the House, or does she just have no idea what her department is doing?

Small BusinessOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Gaspésie—Les-Îles-de-la-Madeleine Québec

Liberal

Diane Lebouthillier LiberalMinister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, our government is committed to ensuring that all Canadians pay their fair share of taxes. We will continue to support small and medium-sized enterprises across Canada because we recognize the critical role they play in our economy. I want to point out that we have not changed the tax rules and that the same provisions on source of income still apply.

Small BusinessOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Blake Richards Conservative Banff—Airdrie, AB

Mr. Speaker, the war on campgrounds continues. Those were shameful talking points that clearly did not answer the question.

In budget 2016, they ended the review that we put in place, after deciding that some businesses were too small to be small businesses. Now the CRA has in fact changed the rules so that many campgrounds are no longer eligible for the small business tax rate. She might want to check her facts. This will force many campgrounds and other small businesses to shut down.

Will the Liberals stop unjustly punishing campground operators and let Canadians enjoy the outdoors without all the Liberal red tape?

Small BusinessOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Gaspésie—Les-Îles-de-la-Madeleine Québec

Liberal

Diane Lebouthillier LiberalMinister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, I will repeat my answer for my colleague opposite who seems to have misunderstood.

Our government will continue to support small and medium-sized enterprises across Canada because we recognize the critical role they play in our economy. I want to point out that we have not changed the tax rules and that the same rules and the same provisions on source of income still apply.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Gord Johns NDP Courtenay—Alberni, BC

Mr. Speaker, this week the Minister of Indigenous Affairs stated, “Negotiation, rather than litigation is our government’s preferred route to settle differences, and right historical wrongs.” Yet, her government not only halted the compensation awarded to the Huu-ay-aht First Nations, but it also launched an extensive judicial review of the decision.

Will the minister stand by her words, call off the government lawyers, and commit in the House today to paying out the award without further delay?