House of Commons Hansard #165 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was education.

Topics

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

It being Wednesday, we will now have the singing of the national anthem led by the hon. member for Sarnia—Lambton.

[Members sang the national anthem]

Malala YousafzaiStatements By Members

3:05 p.m.

Bloc

Xavier Barsalou-Duval Bloc Pierre-Boucher—Les Patriotes—Verchères, QC

Mr. Speaker, these are difficult times for humanity. World peace is more of a dream than a possibility or a reality. Extremism keeps us at arms' length and is tearing us apart. Around the world, there is too much fear, hate, and violence. When humanity faces difficult times, a glimmer of hope always appears.

Malala is a glimmer of hope, and she invites us to be open with one another and to work towards the equality of men and women. She invites us to abandon our prejudices, to get to know one another, and to love one another more. We are pleased to have Malala Yousafzai with us. We admire her. Taking a stand, fighting for justice and for the fundamental right to education, overcoming adversity, and wanting to build a better world is truly inspiring!

I thank Malala for being that extraordinary ray of sunshine that the world truly needs. Thank you for being here with us.

ArmeniaStatements By Members

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Bryan May Liberal Cambridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, last year I participated in the global forum for the prevention of genocide in Armenia and represented Canada at the Armenian genocide remembrance ceremonies. On April 24, we honour the memories of more than one million Armenians who lost their lives.

Preventing atrocities is contingent on recognizing, remembering, and understanding genocides. All nations and peoples must recognize genocide as not a political issue but a historic one. The victims' memories are desecrated today by the wilful ignorance of those who choose to deny these events. Reflecting on genocides, including Armenia, Ukraine, Rwanda, Bosnia, Yazidis, and the Holocaust, we must commit ourselves to the obligations that our humanity demands, ensuring genocide is ended.

I stand with the Armenian community in Cambridge and across Canada as we proclaim: never again.

Charity EventsStatements By Members

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Gérard Deltell Conservative Louis-Saint-Laurent, QC

Mr. Speaker, before talking about my riding, I would like to personally commend you for the comments you made to Malala, particularly the things you said about her parents. Your speech was excellent. I thank you and congratulate you for that.

Like all members of the House, I was in my riding last weekend. I had the pleasure of meeting hundreds of people at charity events. Every weekend I meet committed people, proud Canadians, who are always ready to help others. These include members of the Club de plongeon de Québec, where hundreds of young people and parents care about the future of our youth; the Ancienne-Lorette and Val-Bélair Knights of Columbus, which hold fundraisers to help those in need; the Ancienne-Lorette scouts, who are getting ready for summer camp by hosting their annual spaghetti dinner; the Neufchâtel optimist club; and even family friends and the Christian community of Saint-Ambroise, whom I met at the sugar shack.

Charity EventsStatements By Members

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

I thank the hon. member. That is a good way to get the floor for a few more seconds.

The hon. member for Parkdale—High Park.

The EnvironmentStatements By Members

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Arif Virani Liberal Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, April 22 is Earth Day. In recognition, I want to acknowledge a tremendous organization in my riding of Parkdale—High Park: Green 13.

Green 13 is a collection of residents in my community who work hard every day to raise awareness about the most pressing issue of our generation: climate change. These amazing volunteers dedicate their time to advocating for environmental sustainability and promoting little ways we can all change our behaviour to better protect our communities and our planet. Green 13 is so successful that they have actually inspired a sequel, Green 14, in the other half of my riding. I now have not one but two grassroots groups working hard to protect the environment.

I hope that list keeps growing, but I also know that the fight for a greener future will not be won unless we all play our part. This Earth Day, and every day, I urge all of us to take up this vital fight against climate change.

Pensions and BenefitsStatements By Members

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Scott Duvall NDP Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government and the Prime Minister really need to decide whose side they are on.

The Canadian government recently gave Bombardier millions of dollars in corporate welfare. In return, the company laid off workers while giving multi-million dollar bonuses to its executives. The rich get richer, the workers suffer, and the government simply shrugs as if everything is fine.

When the court allowed U.S. Steel to walk away from its pension obligations, the government and the Prime Minister simply shrugged and said that they are engaged. When U.S. Steel was given permission to cut off funding for pensioners' health care benefits, while at the same time sitting on millions of dollars in cash and giving its executives lavish bonuses, the government and the Prime Minister simply shrugged and said that they are engaged.

Well, the workers and pensioners in Hamilton want to know: On whose behalf are they engaged? It certainly is not the pensioners or the workers.

VaisakhiStatements By Members

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Kamal Khera Liberal Brampton West, ON

Mr. Speaker, Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh.

I rise today to wish all celebrating in Brampton West, across Canada, and around the world a very happy Vaisakhi.

Vaisakhi marks the anniversary of the creation of Khalsa by Guru Gobind Singh Ji, and the founding of the fundamental principles of equality, unity, selfless service, and social justice, values that we are all proud to share as Canadians.

Sikhs arrived in Canada over 100 years ago, and these principles have guided us in building our country. From coast to coast to coast, Sikh Canadians have helped build communities, have fought for equality, have served in our military, and have made significant contributions to our economic and social fabric.

Today these guiding principles are conserved by the efforts of the many gurdwaras all across Canada. I would like to thank the Gurdwara Sikh Sangat in my riding of Brampton West in promoting and upholding these values of Sikhism and making me proud not only as a Sikh but also as a Canadian.

CancerStatements By Members

3:10 p.m.

Conservative

Len Webber Conservative Calgary Confederation, AB

Mr. Speaker, every three minutes cancer picks a fight with another Canadian. That is over 200,000 new cases of cancer diagnosed every year in this country, and those numbers are projected to increase by nearly 40% by 2030.

Even with these disappointing numbers, the overall cancer survival rate has increased from 35% back in the 1950s to over 60% today, thanks in part to research funded by daffodil sales. Yes, April is Daffodil Month, and by making a donation, by buying a daffodil pin, or buying the actual flower means that we are supporting a long history of helping people with cancer and funding life-saving research, education, and support services.

Please support the annual Canadian Cancer Society's April daffodil campaign.

2600 Rochebelle Cadet CorpsStatements By Members

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Joël Lightbound Liberal Louis-Hébert, QC

Mr. Speaker, Canadian Cadet Organizations is the largest youth program in Canada. Speaking purely objectively, the 2600 Rochebelle Cadet Corps is without a doubt one of the most dynamic in the country. Their motto, “challenges, discipline, unity”, summarizes the values of these young people who gather to forge bonds and develop their leadership skills and their civic engagement while challenging themselves physically.

This year, as we celebrate Canada's 150th anniversary, they are celebrating their 60th. I had the honour of marking the occasion with them on April 1. I would like to wish them a happy 60th anniversary, and I also want to thank their captain, Patrick Bélanger, for his dedication, as well as the parents, officers, and volunteers, such as André Picard, people who work every day to help mould these young cadets into model citizens who make a positive contribution to our society.

Cadets, we are proud of you. Sixty years is worth celebrating. I wish you another 60 years and more.

Happy 60th anniversary to the Rochebelle cadets.

CancerStatements By Members

April 12th, 2017 / 3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Ruby Sahota Liberal Brampton North, ON

Mr. Speaker, the month of April is recognized as Cancer awareness month.

It is also the month in which Vaisakhi, the birth of the Khalsa Panth, is celebrated.

Sikh philosophy and teachings stress the importance of noble deeds, selfless giving, and sacrifice. Saving a human life is one of the greatest things one can do according to Sikhism.

Many in my riding of Brampton North and across Canada have raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for cancer research, organized runs, and volunteered their time with organizations like the Guru Gobind Singh Children's Foundation and the Sikh Motorcycle Club.

In honour of Vaisakhi and cancer awareness month, I encourage all Canadians to continue to fight for a cure through giving back and volunteering their time.

Day of PinkStatements By Members

3:10 p.m.

Conservative

Karen Vecchio Conservative Elgin—Middlesex—London, ON

Mr. Speaker, April 12 is known as the Day of Pink. Today is the International Day against Bullying, Discrimination, Homophobia, Transphobia, and Transmisogyny.

Today, communities across the country and across the world unite in celebrating diversity and raising awareness to stop these types of discrimination and all forms of bullying. Discrimination comes in many forms and creates barriers to full participation in our society through bullying, harassment, hate, and violence. In some cases individuals can be rejected by their families, kicked out of their homes, and pushed out of school as a result of who they are. No one should be subjected to such discrimination.

Our nation was built on common values such as tolerance, openness, and diversity, and we must continue to be a model of an inclusive society. We must show future generations that the best way to advance our shared goals is to embrace all members of our human family regardless of who they are.

The message is clear: Anyone can bully and anyone can be victimized by bullying, but together we can stop it.

I invite members to participate in the Day of Pink by tweeting #ICelebrateDiversity and #dayofpink.

CancerStatements By Members

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Dan Ruimy Liberal Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, BC

Mr. Speaker, you may have noticed that I am wearing a daffodil today. April is daffodil month, and the daffodil symbolizes the work done by the Canadian Cancer Society to educate the public and raise funds for cancer research.

We can be proud of the innovative research being done in Canada.

Recently, researchers have been working to block breast cancer with Zantac, normally used for heartburn. Discoveries with pancreatic cancer cells may allow scientists to create drugs to block or reverse the spreading of the disease. New advancements have led to genetic screening, which is less costly, more accessible, and may boost cancer survival rates.

That kind of progress is truly remarkable. I want to thank everyone in Canada who is working to eradicate cancer and providing hope to us all. We need to work together to beat cancer.

ArmeniaStatements By Members

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Arnold Chan Liberal Scarborough—Agincourt, ON

Mr. Speaker, let me thank my friend from Cambridge for his earlier comments. I also stand today as chair of the Canada-Armenia Parliamentary Friendship Group to recognize, along with the Armenian community, April 24, as it commemorates the 102nd anniversary of the Armenian genocide.

This day of remembrance pays tribute to the victims and survivors. To this end, we reaffirm our commitment to an inclusive and diverse society, while rejecting all forms of intolerance, discrimination, and hatred.

April is genocide prevention month, which was led by former MP Brad Butt through his Motion No. 587, and passed by the House in 2015.

This acknowledgement of Armenian genocide memorial day is important for all of us to remember. I commend the Armenian community for passing the memory of the Armenian genocide to future generations. If we do not remember the mistakes of the past, we are destined to repeat them.

On this solemn occasion, let us renew our commitment to stand for human rights and justice at home and around the world.

Rights of WorkersStatements By Members

3:15 p.m.

Conservative

Blaine Calkins Conservative Red Deer—Lacombe, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals would not know the right thing to do if it jumped up and bit them.

A few years ago, my private member's bill, Bill C-525, received royal assent. The bill protected workers' rights by ensuring that mandatory secret ballot voting was used in the certification and decertification of a union.

Shortly after the Liberals took office, they introduced Bill C-4. This piece of poorly written legislation sought, among many other things, to remove a worker's right to a secret ballot vote. Clearly, Bill C-4 was a regressive attempt by the Liberals to gain favour with union bosses as it would have made it easier for unions to use intimidation tactics in the workplace during a union drive.

Yesterday, the Senate of Canada got it right where the Liberal government got it wrong. I am pleased that in the 43:34 decision, the Senate voted to amend Bill C-4 and keep the provision of a mandatory secret ballot vote in place.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the senators for their leadership on the bill and for protecting the rights of workers across Canada.

I would further encourage my colleagues across the way to accept the amendments as presented by the Senate, or get rid of this clearly misguided bill altogether.

International Day of PinkStatements By Members

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Randy Boissonnault Liberal Edmonton Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, on this International Day of Pink when Nobel laureate Malala Yousafzai addressed Parliament, we raise awareness to confront homophobia, trans phobia, trans-misogyny, and all other forms of discrimination and bullying.

Let us all join together today to celebrate diversity and inclusion.

Too many people face discrimination and harassment because they are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, two spirit, or gender non-conforming.

We all have the capacity to celebrate our differences and stand up against the violence, discrimination, and bullying that still happens every day.

Whether our actions are symbolic, substantive, or both, standing up and speaking out make all the difference in the world to those who are bullied.

I call on everyone in the House to proudly wear pink today and to take a stand against bullying and discrimination every day. It is the least that we can do.

Malala Yousafzai, Leymah Gbowee and Yanar MohammedStatements By Members

3:20 p.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière NDP Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, today in Ottawa we are welcoming three courageous women: Malala Yousafzai, from Pakistan, and Leymah Gbowee, from Liberia, both recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize, as well as Yanar Mohammed, from Iraq, a prominent human rights advocate.

This is an extraordinary opportunity to celebrate the role of women in promoting peace and security, which can only be achieved with full respect for human rights.

It is also an occasion to remind ourselves of the need to ensure we walk the talk on feminism and increase funding to implement the women, peace, and security agenda.

We should also increase our support to women at the grassroots level, which right now stands at only 0.03% of Canada's aid budget.

If we really want to support women like Malala, Leymah, and Yanar, we must also fund their work.

Honorary CitizenshipStatements By Members

3:20 p.m.

Conservative

Rachael Harder Conservative Lethbridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, the honorary citizenship bestowed upon Malala Yousafzai today is a wonderful testament to this young woman's strength and perseverance. This long-awaited event is the result of our previous government's decision to award her honorary citizenship. It is an honour that has been extended to only five people previous to her.

At a very young age, she is a symbol of determination and hope for young people around the world.

I am extremely proud to see two different governments come together across many years, and even partisan lines, in order to support Malala's work and her message to the world. She exemplifies so much of what it means to be Canadian: Be brave, trust in our convictions, and stand up for those who need support.

Today, we honour Malala for her courage and with sincere hearts we thank her.

EducationStatements By Members

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Iqra Khalid Liberal Mississauga—Erin Mills, ON

Mr. Speaker, knowledge is power and education empowers. Education empowers youth to do better, to be better, to work toward resolving the issues of our time: extremism, climate, health. It is not easy to fight for the right to education. It takes courage.

When Malala faced persecution in her pursuit of an education for herself and those around her, she had two choices. She could have bent to the will of the ignorant, but she chose to take a stance to empower those around her.

It is an honour to have the Nobel peace laureate Malala Yousafzai with us today. Her advocacy for education is a reminder that we all share responsibility in building a better world.

I look forward to continue working with the Minister of International Development and La Francophonie on empowerment through education in Canada and abroad.

Now more than ever the world needs more Canada.

House of Commons Maintenance StaffStatements By Members

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

Colleagues, there are many people who assist us in doing our work around Parliament Hill. If members do not mind, today I would like to note the maintenance people who help set up for committee meetings and all kinds of things. They worked late last night, setting up for today's special event, and they work so hard for us every day.

TaxationOral Questions

3:20 p.m.

Sturgeon River—Parkland Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, since coming to power, the Liberals have continued to fail the middle class: taxes on payroll, groceries, electricity, and fuel; taxes on public transit and Uber; taxes on beer and wine; taxes on local businesses; and taxes on fishing, camping, passports, and all manner of federal permits.

Can the Prime Minister tell us what he plans to tax next, or when this taxation insanity will end?

TaxationOral Questions

3:25 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, on the contrary, we are proud of our choices to help the middle class. We raised taxes for the wealthiest 1% so that we could lower them for the middle class. We created a Canada child benefit that gives more money to nine out of ten families and will lift 40% or hundreds of thousands of children out of poverty.

Every day, we are working for the middle class and those working hard to join it. We will continue to make choices that will help people across the country.

TaxationOral Questions

3:25 p.m.

Sturgeon River—Parkland Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the truth is that the Prime Minister just cannot help himself from nickel and diming regular Canadians. First, he went after their Saturday night by taxing beer, wine, Uber, bus passes. Now he is going after their May long weekend camping trip too. He is hiking fees on a fishing licence and even on campsites, and those fees are going to keep going up forever.

The middle class and those working hard to join it deserve some rest and relaxation once in a while. Why is the Prime Minister taxing their time off too?

TaxationOral Questions

3:25 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I agree entirely with the member opposite that Canadians love to get outdoors and enjoy our wilderness, which is why I am so proud that this government has made it free access to Canada's national parks for our 150th birthday. The opportunity for millions of Canadians to get out to discover the extraordinary wild spaces across Canada, to see the amazing parks we have is something I know all members of the House will encourage Canadians to go discover our national parks this summer.

TaxationOral Questions

3:25 p.m.

Sturgeon River—Parkland Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, when hard-working Canadians get time off for a family vacation, they are often on a budget. This means that many times they are taking a modest occasional family camping trip. It is affordable, it is relaxing, and it is fun. However, for some reason, the Prime Minister wants to make it less affordable and less fun.

While taxpayers are on the hook for $130,000 for the Prime Minister's private island getaway, fees are going up at campsites all across the country. How is this fair?