House of Commons Hansard #327 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was need.

Topics

Gina Cody School of Engineering and Computer ScienceStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Rob Oliphant Liberal Don Valley West, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted today to celebrate Don Valley West resident Dr. Gina Parvaneh Cody's lifetime contribution in engineering and her generous $15-million gift to Concordia University in Montreal. Born in Iran, Dr. Cody arrived in Canada in 1979 with $2,000 in her pocket.

In 1989, she became the first woman to earn a Ph.D. in building engineering at Concordia. She went on to become president and principal shareholder of CCI, an internationally known consulting firm. In recognition of Gina's achievements in her field, and of her generosity, the engineering school has been renamed the Gina Cody School of Engineering and Computer Science at Concordia University, the first engineering faculty in Canada to be named after a woman.

I want to congratulate Gina Cody and thank her for her generosity.

Her generosity will foster gender equality, diversity and inclusion for the next generation. Our world is changing. It is better through her hard work. I offer my heartfelt thanks to Gina Cody.

National Tree DayStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Liberal Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday was National Tree Day. Trees are essential to our lives. They provide us with oxygen, clean our water, purify our air, elevate our mood and so much more. A tree can sequester 10 tonnes of carbon dioxide by the time it is 40 years old, so trees are invaluable to our battle against climate change. Not only must we take care of our forests, but we must also expand the living infrastructure within our cities.

Successive Canadian governments of all stripes have supported healthy forests, and are bringing more trees into cities. That is why Tree Canada, Canada's leading national tree organization, has recognized the people of Canada with its coveted Eterne Award.

In 2011, this House passed a motion by MP Royal Galipeau to proclaim Canada's first National Tree Day. In Royal's honour, a sugar maple tree was planted yesterday with his widow, Ms. Anne Pallascio, and the Clerk of the Privy Council, to mark this special occasion, National Tree Day 2018.

Orange Shirt DayStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Cathy McLeod Conservative Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo, BC

Mr. Speaker, like many across the country, the first day of school for my family meant new shoes, new clothes and that famous awkward family photo. It also included the children returning excitedly home at the end of the day to share stories about their new teacher and who they got to sit beside. For many residential school survivors, the first day of school was often a day of horror and pain.

Orange Shirt Day was launched in my home province of British Columbia, based on the heartbreaking story of Phyllis Webstad. She was six years old when she began attending St. Joseph's Mission School in Williams Lake. On the first day, a bright, new orange shirt that had been a gift from her grandmother was taken away from her. She wrote, “The colour orange has always reminded me of that day...how my feelings didn't matter, how no one cared and how I felt like I was worth nothing.”

This week, children in schools across Canada will wear orange shirts to commemorate the legacy of the residential schools. As each shirt proudly declares, every child matters. Their traditions, families, communities and dreams matter.

Tourism IndustryStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Alaina Lockhart Liberal Fundy Royal, NB

Mr. Speaker, on World Tourism Day we thank 1.8 million dedicated Canadian tourism workers.

Tourism is an economic driver that creates good jobs in all our communities, from coast to coast to coast.

In fact, the tourism sector provides more jobs for Canadians than the oil and gas, mining, agriculture, aerospace and auto manufacturing industries combined.

This fall we will gather to celebrate Canadian tourism and the amazing award finalists from across the country at the 2018 Canadian Tourism Awards. This year's nominees represent amazing companies and experiences from coast to coast to coast, including Acadian Sturgeon and Caviar from my own riding of Fundy Royal.

With the Canada-China year of tourism well under way, I am proud to be part of a government that is committed to helping Canada's tourism industry flourish to create good jobs for the middle class.

The EnvironmentStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice NDP Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals were elected on a promise to protect the environment and end subsidies to oil and gas companies. What did they do? They used $4.5 billion of taxpayers' money to buy a 65-year-old pipeline, giving an American oil company a 647% profit.

The Liberals were elected on a promise to work towards reconciliation with first nations. What did they do? They bungled the consultation on Trans Mountain and got a slap on the wrist by the Supreme Court. Now the Liberals are saying they are going to redo the consultation, but the project is going ahead regardless. That shows utter contempt for indigenous peoples.

The Conservatives, meanwhile, want to turn back the clock. The energy east pipeline project is supposed to be dead and buried, but apparently they want to bring it back to life, like a zombie. Surprise, surprise—the Liberals are open to it. Welcome to the Liberal-Conservative pipeline coalition. Luckily, the Quebec New Democrats are here to defend the Quebec consensus and protect our environment.

Government PoliciesStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Rosemarie Falk Conservative Battlefords—Lloydminster, SK

Mr. Speaker, this summer, the failures of the Liberal government grew exponentially. Its high-tax agenda continues to chase away economic growth and opportunity. Trade agreements would help increase our competitiveness, but the Liberals cannot seem to get that job done either. The Liberals refused to prioritize passing the CPTPP and left Canadians on the outside looking in on NAFTA negotiations.

Provincial support for the costly and ineffective federal carbon tax is plummeting and the special deal the Liberals cut with large corporations is an admission of their own failed policy.

A month after the Federal Court's decision against the construction of the Trans Mountain pipeline, there is still no plan to get that pipeline built.

Whether it is the economy, trade, taxes, ethics, pipelines or immigration, the failures of the current Liberal government are hurting Canadians. One thing is certain: Canadians deserve better.

Retirement CongratulationsStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Michael Levitt Liberal York Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, this week marks the end of almost a quarter century of service in Canada's Parliament by the Hon. Art Eggleton, who is celebrating his 75th birthday this Saturday and is retiring as a senator after thirteen and a half years.

Before serving in the Senate, Art was a member of this House for 11 years, elected in the riding of York Centre, which I now have the honour to represent. He served in the cabinet of Prime Minister Chrétien in three portfolios over nine years. Before that, he spent 22 years on Toronto city council, 11 of them as the longest-serving mayor of the City of Toronto. Altogether, he has spent over 45 years in public service.

He has been a friend and a mentor to me and was one of my very first supporters.

On behalf of all members of this House, I want to thank Art for his service to Canada, and send best wishes to him and Camille as they head into this new stage of their lives.

International TradeOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, millions of Canadian jobs rely on NAFTA. A failure would be disastrous for our economy. Canadians are becoming more and more nervous and fear for their jobs. It seems as though the Prime Minister did not ask to meet with the president when they were both in New York earlier this week.

Can the Prime Minister explain why he decided that it was not necessary to meet with the president?

International TradeOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, as we have said from the outset, our objective is to update and modernize NAFTA in a way that is good for Canada. We are constructive at the negotiating table. Our negotiators are tough because they are doing their job. It is our responsibility to get a good deal for Canada, and that is exactly what we are going to do.

International TradeOral Questions

September 27th, 2018 / 2:15 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are rightly becoming more and more nervous, especially the millions of Canadians whose jobs depend on NAFTA.

RBC Economics says that 500,000 jobs alone would be vulnerable if NAFTA fails. The Canadian Automobile Dealers Association says an additional 100,000 jobs would be lost in Ontario if auto tariffs are imposed.

Could the Prime Minister inform the House if he has received any assurances that new tariffs on the auto sector will not be applied next week if no deal is reached this week?

International TradeOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, as we have said from the outset, our objective in these talks is to update and modernize NAFTA in a way that is good for Canada and for Canadians.

We are constructive at the negotiating table negotiating in an ongoing fashion to make sure that the deal is right for Canada. It is our job to get the right deal for Canada and for Canadians, and that is exactly what we are going to do.

The Conservatives want to sign any old deal quickly at any time. We will not agree to a deal that is not in the best interests of Canadians.

JusticeOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Prime Minister had multiple opportunities to inform Canadians as to whether or not he will reverse the decision by the Correctional Service of Canada and put Tori Stafford's killer back behind bars. I would like to give him another opportunity to do so today. He knows he has the power. Will he use it?

JusticeOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, as I have said, our hearts go out to the family members of Tori Stafford for the lost they endured.

The offender in question was moved from maximum security to medium security in 2014 under the Conservatives. She remains in medium security now.

As the Conservative member for Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis said in his capacity as public safety minister, “I do not control the security classification of individual prisoners.”

However, the minister has asked that the commissioner of Correctional Service of Canada review this decision to ensure that it was taken properly and in accordance with long-standing policy.

JusticeOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister knows he is playing games with words.

Tori Stafford's killer was behind bars and behind razor wire. Now she is living in a condo. He knows he has the ability to force this decision to be reversed. Section 6 of the act gives him that very power.

I know he would like to talk about every other aspect of this case but it is a very simple question. Will he put Tori Stafford's killer back behind bars?

JusticeOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, once again, to be absolutely clear, the offender in question was moved from maximum security to medium security in 2014 under the Conservatives and she remains in medium security now.

The Conservatives should know that the minister does not control the security classification of individual prisoners because that is exactly what the member for Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis confirmed in the past. The minister has asked the commissioner to review this decision.

As the Conservative member for Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo once said, “We need to let the many steps of an—”

JusticeOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

The hon. Leader of the Opposition.

JusticeOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister knows that Tori Stafford's killer was behind razor wire and bars and is now in a condo.

He also knows that he does have the ability. Let me read to him what the act actually says. It says:

The Governor in Council may appoint a person to be known as the Commissioner of Corrections who, under the direction of the Minister, has the control and management of the Service and all matters connected with the Service.

Will the Prime Minister use the authority he has to put the killer back behind bars?

JusticeOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, once again, I will let Canadians determine who is playing word games with talks of condos.

The facts of the matter are clear. In 2014, under those Conservatives, the offender in question was moved from maximum security to medium security, and that individual remains in medium security to this very day.

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Guy Caron NDP Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, my constituents, including those in Saint-Elzéar-de-Témiscouata, Saint-Honoré-de-Témiscouata and Dégelis are steadfastly opposed to a pipeline in Témiscouata. A number of associations, including the Union des municipalités du Québec, have backed this position. There is much talk about energy east, and the Conservatives want this project back on the table.

Will the Prime Minister confirm that he has no intention of revisiting energy east?

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the energy east pipeline project was cancelled by the company that wanted to carry it out because of changes in market conditions and their business plan.

If people want to propose projects, we will always review them. However, we will make sure that all projects respect indigenous communities, the communities affected, science, and environmental protection. This is what Canadians across the country expect.

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Guy Caron NDP Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, media reports suggest that the government's lawyers are trying to keep findings of allegations of CSIS spying on anti-pipeline activists private. This is deeply concerning. It is alleged that CSIS considered opposition to the petroleum industry a threat to national security and shared information with the National Energy Board about so-called radicalized environmentalists and passed this information to oil companies. If any of this is true, it is highly concerning.

When will the government stop using the Harper approach and respect environmental activists' rights?

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I can certainly reconfirm that this government believes in the rights of all Canadians to protest and communicate their positions in a peaceful manner.

In 2017, the Security Intelligence Review Committee investigated and dismissed the complaint. SIRC's decision to maintain the confidentiality of its report and related documents will be reviewed and addressed by the Federal Court. Of course, as this case is currently before the courts, we cannot comment further at this time.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Romeo Saganash NDP Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister committed to free, prior and informed consent on projects affecting indigenous peoples' rights, but he is determined to push ahead with the pipeline opposed by first nations.

Reconciliation is not a talking point. It requires true understanding. Will the Prime Minister commit today to have his full cabinet sit with indigenous knowledge keepers to learn what free, prior and informed consent really means?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for his deep passion for this file, one that we all care deeply about as Canadians, and that we need to continue to work on. We recognize that there is much to do in terms of reconciliation. That is why we are moving forward in consultation in supporting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

We will continue to listen to all voices, those in favour of projects and those opposed to projects, to make sure that we work together to get the right path for Canada.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Romeo Saganash NDP Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, QC

Wow, Mr. Speaker, it is becoming a file-to-file relationship.

The Prime Minister committed to obtain the free, prior and informed consent of first nations. However, he is determined to move forward with this pipeline that the first nations reject. Reconciliation is not just an empty word. It requires true understanding.

Will the Prime Minister commit today to have his full cabinet sit with indigenous knowledge keepers to learn what free and informed consent really means?