House of Commons Hansard #6 of the 43rd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was need.

Topics

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Niki Ashton NDP Churchill—Keewatinook Aski, MB

Mr. Speaker, when it comes to first nations, the Prime Minister says one thing and does another. He says he believes in reconciliation, but then he takes first nations children to court. Instead of starting the reconciliation process, his government is perpetuating colonialism. Let us be clear. His government's negligence towards these children is costing lives.

Will the government stop taking first nations children to court, yes or no?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs Québec

Liberal

Marc Miller LiberalMinister of Indigenous Services

Mr. Speaker, today we are in full compliance with all of the tribunal's orders to address the overrepresentation of first nation children in care. We have almost doubled funding to child and family services, and close to 500,000 Jordan's principle requests have been approved.

We agree that the most recent orders for compensation for first nation children harmed by government policies must be respected. What the tribunal has asked parties to do is to sit down and work out what exactly the compensation for victims will look like, and that is what we are doing.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus NDP Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, since the Prime Minister began his legal vendetta against the Human Rights Tribunal, we have lost over 100 first nations children in Ontario alone, including 16-year-old Devon Freeman who hung from a tree for seven months outside the group home. It has been over a year since the Prime Minister's lawyers told the Human Rights Tribunal they were not going to negotiate with Cindy Blackstock about compensation, they would rather litigate. They are still in court trying to quash this decision.

Parliament has ordered the Liberal government to stop this vendetta. When are the Liberals going to call off their lawyers?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs Québec

Liberal

Marc Miller LiberalMinister of Indigenous Services

Mr. Speaker, we agree that we must compensate first nations children harmed by past government policies. We are seeking a solution that is at the same time comprehensive, fair and equitable. That is why I have instructed my assistant deputy minister to work with those involved with the CHRT and those involved in the Moushoom class action to develop the best possible method that includes all affected children.

Nothing about our commitment to implement other orders from the CHRT, or reforming child and family services for that matter, changes. This work will continue.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Jaime Battiste Liberal Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, this is my first time rising in this House. I want to thank the good people from Sydney—Victoria for electing me as their member of Parliament. I would also like to thank all the volunteers whose hard work resulted in our victory.

[Member spoke in Mi’kmaq and provided the following text:]

Msit Nokomatut, Eymu'tik tan teluwitmek UN year ujit Lnu`sltikw, aq kejitu teplutaqn etek ujit apoqnmitamukw tan teli Lnui`sltikw. Ketu pipanimk mawi espipite'w Kaplnewel maliaptoq lnuekatik, tali kisi apoqnmatisnukw tan teli lnu`sltukiw ujit elmkinek. Mita menuaqlu'kik nutkwotlitewk siawi`lnuisltenew iapjui.

[Member provided the following translation:]

All my relations, we are currently in the United Nations Year of Indigenous Languages. While I understand legislation has been created to ensure protection of languages, my question for the Minister of Indigenous Services is how do we plan on implementing the language act, so that future generations of indigenous peoples are given the resources to ensure they can continue to speak the language proudly?

[English]

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs Québec

Liberal

Marc Miller LiberalMinister of Indigenous Services

[Member spoke in Mi’kmaq and provided the following text:]

Wela’lin ta’n telpi panigasin.

[Member provided the following translation:]

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for his question.

[English]

We are implementing the indigenous languages act in collaboration with those who know best how to revitalize their languages, indigenous peoples and teachers, and we are doing so by providing $337 million over the next five years for indigenous languages and $1,500 per year for each kindergarten to grade 12 first nation student as part of the new co-developed education funding policy.

This government is firm in its resolve to support indigenous languages.

Intergovernmental RelationsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Bernard Généreux Conservative Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, QC

Mr. Speaker, despite the 35 members elected in Quebec, the Liberals did not address any of Quebec's requests in the throne speech. There was nothing on a single tax return, no commitment for the third link in the Quebec City area and no sign of any willingness to give Quebec more autonomy in immigration.

It is enough to make one wonder what kind of deal the government made with the Bloc for it to rush to support the throne speech.

Intergovernmental RelationsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount Québec

Liberal

Marc Garneau LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, there were no backroom discussions leading up to the throne speech. As we know, the throne speech is a document that outlines the broad themes the government plans to address. The details will come, projects will be announced, and the opposition can judge us at that point.

Intergovernmental RelationsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Conservative Lévis—Lotbinière, QC

Mr. Speaker, we, the Conservatives, care about the Quebec nation and will work tirelessly to ensure that Quebec remains strong in a united Canada. Despite the Bloc Québécois' rush to support the Liberals on the throne speech, Quebec's three requests were left out of that speech: a single tax return, more autonomy for Quebec on immigration, and a third link between Lévis and Quebec City.

Where are the Liberals and the Bloc Québécois when it comes time to work for Quebec's best interests?

Intergovernmental RelationsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount Québec

Liberal

Marc Garneau LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, there are 35 of us who are here for Quebec. We will work for Quebec's interests. All I can say is that I hope the opposition will work with us for the interests of Quebec and Canada.

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Gerald Soroka Conservative Yellowhead, AB

Mr. Speaker, premiers are united behind promoting our natural resources in a responsible manner. The export of more liquefied natural gas by Canadian producers will lower global emissions and create good, high-paying jobs. With 71,200 jobs lost last month, this could not come at a more important time.

Will the environment minister commit to amending Bill C-69 to allow for the construction of more LNG facilities?

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

December 12th, 2019 / 2:50 p.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Seamus O'Regan LiberalMinister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, just to remind everyone, LNG Canada represents the single-largest private sector investment in Canadian history. It is a $40-billion investment that is going to create 10,000 jobs at the height of construction and hundreds of millions of dollars in construction contracts for indigenous businesses, all while having the lowest carbon intensity of any large-scale LNG facility in the world and helping to reduce coal plant emissions in Asian markets.

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Tako Van Popta Conservative Langley—Aldergrove, BC

Mr. Speaker, my home province of B.C. can contribute in a very significant way to the fight against global climate change by providing clean LNG to Canada and the rest of the world, yet this industry is suffering under excessive restrictions and investors are losing confidence.

Western Canada needs changes to Bill C-69, the no more pipelines bill, so the industry can be fully developed.

When will the government make the necessary amendments to Bill C-69?

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Seamus O'Regan LiberalMinister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, Canada is well positioned to become a major player in the global LNG industry. We are taking action to be the world's cleanest producer of LNG.

Projects like LNG Canada are creating jobs for Canadians, opportunities for indigenous businesses—

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

We were doing so well. I want to remind members that when someone asks or answers a question, we all want to hear what it is. I will allow the minister to finish his answer.

The hon. Minister of Natural Resources.

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Seamus O'Regan Liberal St. John's South—Mount Pearl, NL

Mr. Speaker, we are at COP in Madrid right now and we are working hard to ensure that we get this right for the environment and for the economy.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Bloc Montarville, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, Raif Badawi began another hunger strike to draw the world's attention to his wrongful imprisonment in Saudi Arabia. He has begun another hunger strike to draw the attention of Canada, which has left him languishing in prison for seven years. He has begun another hunger strike that will cause even more worry for his wife, Ensaf Haidar, whom I salute, and their children. They miss him.

What will it take for the government to take action and finally get Raif Badawi released?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Rob Oliphant Liberal Don Valley West, ON

Mr. Speaker, the promotion and protection of human rights, including the right to freedom of expression, freedom of conscience and freedom of religion or belief, are an integral part of Canadian foreign policy. We remain extremely concerned about Raif Badawi's situation.

We have raised it at the highest levels. We have repeatedly called for clemency to be granted. We will stand with Mr. Badawi. We will stand with people facing human rights atrocities around the world.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Bloc Montarville, QC

Mr. Speaker, the time for talk is over.

It is scandalous that Raif Badawi is still languishing in prison after seven years without having committed any crime. If the government can sit down and work with Saudi Arabia at the G20, if it can sit down with Saudi Arabia to do business and sell the country weapons, then it can certainly sit down with Saudi Arabia to demand the release of Raif Badawi.

What meaningful action does the government intend to take to finally have Raif Badawi released?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Rob Oliphant Liberal Don Valley West, ON

Mr. Speaker, let me assure all members of the House that our hearts go out to Mr. Badawi and his family. The Prime Minister has spoken directly to the Saudi Crown Prince and to the King of Saudi Arabia about this particular case. We have raised the case directly to the Saudi minister of foreign affairs.

Our goal is not to grandstand; it is to work persistently, calmly and patiently to have Mr. Badawi reunited with his family.

AgricultureOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Alex Ruff Conservative Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound, ON

Mr. Speaker, as this is my first time asking a question in the House, I would be remiss if I did not first thank the constituents of Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound for giving me the pleasure of continuing to serve Canadians and to serve them.

I was very disappointed last week, when listening to the throne speech, to hear very little mention of rural Canada and our critical and diverse agricultural sector.

Ontario farmers are suffering from a lack of processing capacity and their inability to sell fed cattle to the United States. The government missed a critical deadline to apply to the World Organisation for Animal Health for negligible risk status. Why?

AgricultureOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Compton—Stanstead Québec

Liberal

Marie-Claude Bibeau LiberalMinister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, we understand that the closure of a meat processing plant in Ontario has significant impacts on our cattle producers, but we cannot compromise on food safety. Our government is working with the industry and with the Province of Ontario to find short-term alternatives and to see how the meat processing capacity can be increased.

AgricultureOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Damien Kurek Conservative Battle River—Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, Battle River—Crowfoot is proud to produce some of the best beef in the world, yet it is still recovering from the BSE crisis that nearly devastated the industry a decade and a half ago. However, on this road to recovery it was dealt a significant setback when the Liberals missed a simple deadline to apply to the World Organisation for Animal Health for negligible risk status. Alberta ranchers are suffering due to this Liberal mistake.

Could the Minister of Agriculture please explain to the Canadian beef industry simply why this deadline was missed?

AgricultureOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Compton—Stanstead Québec

Liberal

Marie-Claude Bibeau LiberalMinister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, our government will always stand up for ranchers and farmers. We know how important it is for the beef sector to be granted negligible BSE risk status.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is working with the beef sector to develop a strong submission to the World Organisation for Animal Health for spring 2020.