House of Commons Hansard #26 of the 43rd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was debate.

Topics

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Toronto—Danforth Ontario

Liberal

Julie Dabrusin LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage

Madam Speaker, as my friend from across the way knows, we are reviewing all of the regulations and are committed to ensuring that Canadian creators are paid their fair share. That is something we are continuing to work on, and I look forward to working with the member from across the way as we work on those proposals.

FinanceOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Dan Albas Conservative Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, BC

Madam Speaker, despite the federal government ignoring the scourge of money laundering, a provincial inquiry into the practice has started in B.C. BMW told the inquiry that the lack of port police has allowed a massive increase in illegal exports to China. This is a huge problem because the federal government has rejected calls to subject luxury car purchases to FINTRAC reporting.

Either these Liberals are ignorant to what is happening in my home province, which, despite its distance, is still part of this country, or they just do not care. Which is it?

FinanceOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Central Nova Nova Scotia

Liberal

Sean Fraser LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance and to the Minister of Middle Class Prosperity and Associate Minister of Finance

Madam Speaker, when it comes to money laundering, our government put in place a strong regime to make sure that we are watching out for this kind of irresponsible and, frankly, illegal behaviour.

We are working with the provinces so we can highlight the information for beneficial owners. We are going to continue to work with all parties of the House to ensure we are taking care of Canadians. I look forward to a follow-up conversation with the member to discuss this in more detail.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Laurel Collins NDP Victoria, BC

Madam Speaker, the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs have been asking for weeks for a meeting with the Prime Minister, but he just cannot seem to find the time. When wealthy and powerful corporations like Enbridge and Suncor ask for a meeting, he does not hesitate.

Canadians are waiting on the Prime Minister to show some leadership and take real action to de-escalate this situation. Why does the Prime Minister have time for big oil and gas but not for indigenous leaders?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Scarborough—Rouge Park Ontario

Liberal

Gary Anandasangaree LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations

Madam Speaker, I want to start by rejecting the premise of that question.

I want to reiterate that, as we speak right now, our Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations is in British Columbia, along with her B.C. counterpart, in meetings with the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs. We are encouraged by the recent developments, and we are encouraged that all parties have come together to create the necessary conditions for this meeting.

It is a positive first step and discussions will continue. As the hereditary chiefs made clear to their supporters yesterday, they now “need time to have discussions...in an atmosphere of” respect.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice NDP Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Madam Speaker, this morning on the radio, our friend Romeo Saganash reminded us that every crisis is an opportunity to achieve great things. Right now, there are two convergent battles being waged: the fight for indigenous rights and the fight against climate change. However, the Prime Minister seems incapable of seizing this opportunity. What is worse, he does not even seem to care. He is sending his ministers to try to resolve the problem, while he keeps a comfortable distance.

Does he realize that he is the Prime Minister and that he is the one responsible, or does he really not want to be Prime Minister anymore because things are getting complicated?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Scarborough—Rouge Park Ontario

Liberal

Gary Anandasangaree LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations

Madam Speaker, I want to start by acknowledging the tremendous work of our Prime Minister and the leadership he has shown over the past five weeks in extreme resolve to ensure that we move forward in a manner that respects reconciliation. I know that as I speak right now, our Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations is in British Columbia with her B.C. counterpart, meeting with the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs.

We will continue to engage in a manner that respects indigenous rights and ensures that we move forward on the very important work of reconciliation that involves each and every Canadian.

HealthOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Tony Van Bynen Liberal Newmarket—Aurora, ON

Madam Speaker, I recently met with the Canadian Cancer Society and I was told that one in two Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer in his or her lifetime. Although investments in research, early detection and treatment have resulted in more people surviving cancer than ever before, there is more to be done.

Too many Canadians and too many people in Newmarket—Aurora have been impacted by cancer. Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health please tell my constituents what we are doing to prevent and treat this disease that has touched so many of us?

HealthOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Dartmouth—Cole Harbour Nova Scotia

Liberal

Darren Fisher LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health

Madam Speaker, I thank the member for Newmarket—Aurora for his question.

Almost every Canadian knows someone who has battled cancer. That is why we support prevention and treatment with over $50 million annually to organizations like the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer and to cancer research, with $150 million from budget 2019. We are also working to reduce cancer risk factors like unhealthy eating, physical inactivity and smoking.

I want to thank the member for his work as a new member of the health committee and for his advocacy.

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Randy Hoback Conservative Prince Albert, SK

Madam Speaker, farmers in Saskatchewan and across Canada just cannot catch a break this year. Whether it is the weather, illegal rail blockades or a carbon tax, this past year has been a costly one for farmers, and now they do not have the cash flow to put in this year's crop. However, the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food can actually do something. The question is, will she?

Will the minister commit to pushing back the repayment date for the advance payments program to help our farmers get back on their feet?

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bay of Quinte Ontario

Liberal

Neil Ellis LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Madam Speaker, we understand the pressure and stress that our farmers are facing following a tough 2019 year. We made changes to the advance payments program last year to help address cash flow issues by increasing the maximum loan limit to $1 million. We have the authority to give farmers more time to repay their loans if an APP administrator requests it and if the situation warrants it.

We are in close contact with our third party program administrators to monitor the evolving needs of the farmers and will duly evaluate any request for a stay of default.

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Dan Mazier Conservative Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa, MB

Madam Speaker, spring is supposed to be a time of hope and renewal for Canadian farmers. Unfortunately, our railways have been shackled by the government due to the lack of action in removing illegal blockades. Farmers are about to experience payment deadlines from creditors next month. With no hope of getting their grain to market, farmers will be hit with an interest rate of approximately 20%.

Our farmers need action. When will the government commit to modifying the cash advance program to address this current crisis?

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

February 28th, 2020 / 11:50 a.m.

Bay of Quinte Ontario

Liberal

Neil Ellis LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Madam Speaker, as I said before, we understand the pressures and the stress of the 2019 season. We made changes to the advance payments program last year to address cash flows by increasing maximum loan limits to $1 million. We have the authority to give farmers more time to repay their loans if the APP administrator requests it and if the situation warrants it.

We are in close contact with our third party program administrators to monitor the needs of farmers and will evaluate the requests for a stay of default.

Public SafetyOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Blaine Calkins Conservative Red Deer—Lacombe, AB

Madam Speaker, in January, the federal, provincial and territorial ministers for justice and public safety met in Victoria and agreed to examine the impacts of rural crime and how to reduce it through a pan-Canadian working group on rural crime. It has been over a month and we have not heard a peep from the Minister of Justice.

Crime is ravaging rural communities. People do not feel safe in their homes. They are losing faith in the justice system.

When will the minister announce the details of this pan-Canadian working group?

Public SafetyOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

LaSalle—Émard—Verdun Québec

Liberal

David Lametti LiberalMinister of Justice

Madam Speaker, this subject did come up at our last meeting of federal, provincial and territorial ministers of justice. I have committed to working with that group moving forward. We have assigned our deputy ministers the task of moving forward. Indeed, I have committed to my counterpart in Alberta to visit rural parts of northern Alberta and northern Saskatchewan in order to see it first-hand.

Public SafetyOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Bob Saroya Conservative Markham—Unionville, ON

Madam Speaker, last Friday, the GTA was shaken by a horrific attack. In Scarborough, a woman was murdered by a stranger with a hammer, right on the sidewalk. The police have now charged the attacker with terrorism. These types of lone-actor terror attacks are common in Europe and elsewhere, but not here.

Could the Minister of Public Safety tell the House what the government is doing to make sure this does not happen again?

Public SafetyOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Louis-Hébert Québec

Liberal

Joël Lightbound LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Madam Speaker, first, I want to offer my sympathies to the family and friends of the victim.

While I cannot comment on this specific case, I can tell the House that we trust law enforcement and prosecutors to apply the law to its full extent. We have invested significant resources in law enforcement and intelligence agencies in this country over the last four years and will continue to do so.

Employment InsuranceOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Louise Chabot Bloc Thérèse-De Blainville, QC

Madam Speaker, all workers contribute to employment insurance, so they should all be able to access it, and the program should meet their needs. Employment insurance leaves seasonal workers out in the cold every year by subjecting them to weeks of misery during which they receive no income. The Conseil national des chômeurs et chômeuses, which advocates for the unemployed, was in Ottawa this week calling on the government to make the pilot project permanent and improve it by reducing the eligibility threshold to 420 hours, for starters.

Are the minister and the government ready to go ahead and do that?

Employment InsuranceOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Delta B.C.

Liberal

Carla Qualtrough LiberalMinister of Employment

Madam Speaker, we are committed to making this initiative permanent for seasonal workers. We recognize the unique challenges they face. That is why, in 2018, we announced $230 million to better support seasonal workers. We will continue to support Canadians who work in seasonal industries and help them cope with their off-season challenges.

Employment InsuranceOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Louise Chabot Bloc Thérèse-De Blainville, QC

Madam Speaker, the work is seasonal, but the workers' needs are not.

EI needs to become a true insurance plan for the families in Quebec's regions that depend on seasonal industries. It is also important that the eligibility criteria reflect the reality in those regions. Workers should qualify after 420 hours of work, and benefits should be based on the workers' 12 best weeks. This would improve the pilot project.

Will the government make its project permanent and adapt it to people's reality?

Employment InsuranceOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Delta B.C.

Liberal

Carla Qualtrough LiberalMinister of Employment

Madam Speaker, as I said, we are committed to making this pilot project permanent. We will, of course, work with all members of the House to improve all our EI programs and ensure that all workers get the benefits they need.

The EconomyOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Kelly McCauley Conservative Edmonton West, AB

Madam Speaker, the Minister of Middle Class Prosperity makes over $264,000 a year. Despite her riding being within walking distance of Parliament Hill, and despite making over five times the average Canadian, she is now asking for $2,000 more for a motor car allowance.

Does the minister think a taxpayer-funded car allowance is a reality for middle-class Canadians, or is the reality another thing she cannot define?

The EconomyOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Ottawa—Vanier Ontario

Liberal

Mona Fortier LiberalMinister of Middle Class Prosperity and Associate Minister of Finance

Madam Speaker, the reality is that the middle class is very important to this country. We understand the challenges that middle-class Canadians face. The cost of living changes based on where you live in the country or whether you live in a large city. Some families have two incomes, while others are single-parent families.

What matters to Canadians is having an affordable home, a good-paying job and a secure retirement. That is why we are examining this issue. We want to ensure that life is good and affordable for the middle class.

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Michael Barrett Conservative Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes, ON

Madam Speaker, how does one become a judge in Canada? Well, under the Liberal government, one had better be a Liberal. Donating helps applicants, too. This government's use of its political database Liberalist in judicial appointments directly contradicts the PMO line, “All judicial appointments follow our new, open, independent, transparent and merit-based process.”

They will always put their Liberal friends first. When will the Prime Minister stop rewarding Liberals and start appointing judges based on their merit?

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

LaSalle—Émard—Verdun Québec

Liberal

David Lametti LiberalMinister of Justice

Madam Speaker, I completely reject the premise of that question.

Our government has put into place a process for selecting judges that is transparent and based on merit. Judges are evaluated by judicial appointment committees across Canada. Those committees work hard, and they are completely apolitical. We then use the recommended and highly recommended candidates from those lists on the basis of merit moving forward as the basis for our judicial appointments.

We are proud of our record in this matter.