House of Commons Hansard #14 of the 43rd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was case.

Topics

UkraineStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

I want to take this opportunity to remind all members that it is not allowed to point to someone who is here visiting with us in the House.

The hon. member for Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup.

Kamouraska Community Futures Development CorporationStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Bernard Généreux Conservative Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, QC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize a thriving circular economy initiative in the Kamouraska region, one of the four RCMs in my magnificent riding.

The Kamouraska Société d'aide au développement de la collectivité has been leading this initiative for several years now, together with numerous regional partners. More than 526 tonnes of material have been diverted from landfill, roughly 501 tonnes of greenhouse gases have been prevented, and businesses have saved more than $112,000.

The initiative was in the running in the “economic development” category of the Place Marketing Awards event being held this spring in Marseille.

I will shortly be setting off on a sustainable development tour of my riding to promote the initiatives in my region, and the circular economy will be part of that. It is a hidden gem that deserves to be shared.

Once again, I want to congratulate these visionaries back home who are making the environment a priority. I am very proud to represent them.

Black History MonthStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Bratina Liberal Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, ON

Mr. Speaker, this is Black History Month.

In Hamilton the achievements of African Canadian residents are celebrated at the annual John C. Holland awards. In 1954, Reverend Holland was our first ever citizen of the year. In 2006, a poll of Hamiltonians named the hon. Lincoln Alexander the greatest Hamiltonian ever.

Twenty-six years ago, a 16-year-old refugee from Somalia arrived in Hamilton, attended Sir John A. Macdonald high school, starred on the track team and quickly assimilated into Canadian life, so much so that he now sits in this House as a minister of the Crown and member for York South—Weston.

We are lucky to have a growing francophone population thanks to immigration from francophone African countries.

Judging by the young award winners and nominees this past Saturday night, Hamilton's black community will have many more leaders to celebrate as these young people take their place in all levels of Canadian society, the true legacy of Black History Month.

Marc-Aurèle-FortinStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Yves Robillard Liberal Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, QC

Mr. Speaker, as the House has resumed sitting, I will take this opportunity to thank the people of Marc-Aurèle-Fortin for once again putting their trust in me and allowing me to serve as an MP for a second term.

I intend to continue the work I began in my first term and therefore I pledge to continue working hard to defend the interests of the residents of Laval. I will ensure that their voices are heard here in Canada's House of Commons.

I want to especially thank my many volunteers, my incredible team and all the representatives of cultural communities, without whom this successful campaign would not have been possible.

I extend best wishes to everyone for a very successful 2020.

CancerStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Matt Jeneroux Conservative Edmonton Riverbend, AB

Mr. Speaker, half of Canadians are expected to be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. Today is World Cancer Day, a reminder why we need to continue working toward a world where no Canadian fears cancer.

As a nation, we have made significant strides in cancer research, early detection and treatment. We have more people surviving cancer than ever before. The five-year survival for cancer has increased to 63%. However, a person's experience with cancer does not end just because the treatment is over.

The Canadian Cancer Society provides the largest cancer support system in the country and funds groundbreaking research so we can reduce the number of Canadians diagnosed with cancer.

Cancer touches all Canadians, whether personally or through family and friends. Today helps us remember why we need to keep working together to end cancer.

CancerStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Pam Damoff Liberal Oakville North—Burlington, ON

Mr. Speaker, today is World Cancer Day, a day to raise awareness, honour survivors and remember those whose lives were lost to this disease. They are people like 14-year-old Ayverie Caster, the Toronto Raptors' number one fan who died before seeing her team win a world championship.

Childhood cancer remains the number one disease killer of children. On February 19, all proceeds from the Raptors' 905 game in Mississauga will be donated to childhood cancer research. Let us sell out the stadium in Ayverie's memory.

Last year our government invested $150 million into the Terry Fox Research Institute's Marathon of Hope Cancer Centres, an investment I am incredibly proud to have been involved with.

Cancer is a lousy disease that has touched all of us in this place. We continue to make strides, but so much more needs to be done.

Mr. Speaker, through you, I say to my sister Jill, you have got this and I love you.

Wine IndustryStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Tracy Gray Conservative Kelowna—Lake Country, BC

Mr. Speaker, in 2018, following the Liberal government's introduction of an escalator tax, meaning an automatic tax increase for imported beer, wines and spirits, Australia requested a review at the World Trade Organization for Canada's exemption for 100% Canadian wines. The WTO draft report is anticipated in April, with the final legally binding report this summer.

This could have a catastrophic effect on some 400 Canadian wineries, including 32 in my community of Kelowna—Lake Country, forcing them to bear the burden of tens of millions of dollars in new taxes per year, putting this important industry and 6,000 Canadian jobs at risk.

The Conservative members asked the government to engage with Australia to resolve the dispute prior to the WTO ruling. The response from the minister responsible stated, “Australia's position on the excise duty exemption has been unwavering and clear.” Basically, Australia drew a line in the sand, and the minister is saying, “What are you going to do?”

The government needs to take this seriously and come up with a plan for our wineries.

Wine IndustryStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

I want to take this opportunity to remind the hon. members that statements by members are taking place. I encourage everyone to listen, because they are very interesting.

Carbon PricingStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Philip Lawrence Conservative Northumberland—Peterborough South, ON

Mr. Speaker, this morning, the Parliamentary Budget Office released its review of the carbon tax. We have heard from Canadians across our country that the carbon tax is making life more difficult for Canadians.

Farmers are particularly struggling, as they have faced additional headwinds, including trade disruption, a wet spring and global pricing instability. To add insult to injury, we are now adding a tax on a tax. The GST is indeed being taxed on the carbon tax. I have a receipt from one of our local farmers, showing that in addition to paying $7,000 in carbon tax, the government has said that is not enough and he has had to pay $350 in GST on top of that carbon tax.

The most recent Parliamentary Budget Office report stated that the government collected over $100 million in GST by taxing the carbon tax. If a bank tried to charge interest on interest, it would be charged with usury.

The government needs to give relief to the carbon scam. We need to give farmers a break.

Old Age SecurityStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Scott Duvall NDP Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are wondering why proposed changes to the OAS benefits will leave behind those aged 65 to 74. Raising benefits for only those over 75 will not fix indexing problems the government promised seniors five years ago. This means living standards for seniors will continue to fall behind other Canadians and the gap will grow faster for those between 65 and 74. Those relying the most on OAS benefits, like single seniors and women, will be hit the hardest.

This is unacceptable. The government is creating two classes of seniors. The increase should be applied to all people over the age of 65.

When the Conservatives raised the retirement age to 67, Canadians rebelled. Has the government found a crafty way to increase the eligibility age, smoothing the waters with a small increase for a limited number of seniors? Every senior in our country deserves a raise.

I ask the Liberals to abandon this proposal and come up with a plan that truly provides retirement security for all Canadians.

Supply ManagementStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Bloc

Yves Perron Bloc Berthier—Maskinongé, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois has recently been focusing on CUSMA's failure to protect aluminum workers. I want to reiterate that we will never forget that this agreement was reached at the expense of Quebec's dairy producers. It is scandalous that the government breached supply management three times in three consecutive agreements.

We will not rest until farmers are fully compensated for these three trade agreements. We will speak out against any future breach of supply management starting with the imminent negotiations with the United Kingdom in the wake of Brexit.

There is a more immediate challenge we need to deal with before that. By preventing our producers from disposing of their surplus product, CUSMA could destabilize supply management. By ramming through the agreement, the government is doing more damage.

My message is simple: Our dairy producers and processors have paid enough. Enough is enough.

TelecommunicationsStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Michael Chong Conservative Wellington—Halton Hills, ON

Mr. Speaker, freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication, are guaranteed fundamental freedoms under section 2 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. They are the foundation of a free and democratic society.

Last week, the BTLR panel submitted its report to government. Many of the recommendations are so shocking that the government must immediately take a clear and unequivocal stand against them. Saying it will not regulate news content or news organizations is not good enough.

The recommendations propose that the government regulate all commercial content on the Internet, both domestic and foreign. If adopted, these recommendations could lead to the largest regulation and restriction of free speech in Canadian history.

The Liberal government must make it clear that the report's recommendations on regulating and licensing Internet content are dead on arrival.

Black History MonthStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Soraya Martinez Ferrada Liberal Hochelaga, QC

Mr. Speaker, every February, Black History Month gives Canadians an opportunity to celebrate the heritage and contributions of the black community. Today, I would like to acknowledge some extraordinary black women who have helped create a diverse and inclusive Canadian society.

Jean Augustine, the first black female member of Parliament, was elected in 1993. Ms. Augustine was a passionate advocate for social justice. It was her motion, unanimously adopted in 1995, that led the federal government to create Black History Month.

Rosemary Brown was the first black woman to be elected to a provincial legislature and became the first woman to run for the leadership of a federal party in 1975. Ms. Brown fought hard against racism and sexism and worked to improve services for immigrants, persons with disabilities, seniors and marginalized groups.

I thank these black women, who, along with many others, paved the way for women in politics.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, we are all too familiar with the sordid details of Marylène Levesque's murder. Canadians are shocked that the government encouraged a murderer to seek sexual services. We need to shed light on this situation, but bureaucrats investigating other bureaucrats is not good enough.

Will the Prime Minister commit to supporting our motion and enabling the public safety and national security committee to investigate?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Scarborough Southwest Ontario

Liberal

Bill Blair LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, I share the concern about this tragedy, as I think all Canadians do. We want to make sure that we get the facts and get to the bottom of this. It is one of the reasons we have asked the two federal agencies involved to convene a board of investigation.

That board of investigation will feature two external vice-chairs, and it has been convened to examine the circumstances that led to this tragic event. As well, we have made a commitment that its findings will be made public and transparent.

We encourage a thorough examination of all aspects of this, but it is very important to focus on what actually happened rather than make presumptions based on misinformation.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, what actually happened is that a violent murderer was encouraged to seek the services of a sex worker. That is unacceptable, and a parliamentary committee has the right and the obligation to do its work to find out what happened. Marylène Levesque did not deserve to die because of someone's decision like this.

Today, the Minister of Justice introduced a bill to require new sexual assault training for judges, but it is silent on training for members of the Parole Board.

Given recent events, will the government expand this training to ensure Parole Board members and parole officers receive similar training?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Scarborough Southwest Ontario

Liberal

Bill Blair LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, the bill that was introduced today is a very important one. I am encouraged to hear of the member's and his party's support for it.

We believe that training is very important. One of the things that will be examined in the investigation currently undertaken is to look at the policies, procedures and training currently available to all members who are involved in this activity. Therefore, we certainly support that where training is required, that it be made available and that it be effective in ensuring such a tragedy does not occur again.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, we are encouraged that the Liberals have decided to adopt our bill. Given his comments, we look forward to amendments that could be moved at committee to ensure the training is expanded.

However, the fact remains that Marylène Levesque was murdered because of decisions made by people involved in approving release plans.

Therefore, I have a simple question. Are the people who approved a release plan that included a violent murderer getting services from a sex worker still hearing cases today?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Scarborough Southwest Ontario

Liberal

Bill Blair LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, it is important to recognize that in this tragic case, the Parole Board actually issued rather explicit written instructions that this was not to occur. Unfortunately, and tragically, someone made that decision and that individual will be held to account. Also, that individual is not currently involved in any decision-making with respect to any prisoner.

We will ensure we get the facts of this case and we will act on those facts to ensure this terrible tragedy never occurs again.

Public SafetyOral Questions

February 4th, 2020 / 2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Paul-Hus Conservative Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, today the government introduced a bill to ensure that judges undergo training on the subject of victims of sexual assault, but it could have included training for parole officers. The Prime Minister is well aware that the Parole Board of Canada has been in crisis for the past two weeks, ever since it gave its approval for a violent murderer on day parole to seek sexual services. How Parole Board members failed to recognize the potential danger of that strategy is beyond me.

Why did the government not include training for officers in its bill?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Scarborough Southwest Ontario

Liberal

Bill Blair LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, as I have indicated, last September, the Parole Board of Canada explicitly opposed letting the accused visit massage parlours while on day parole. At the same time, we have undertaken to do a comprehensive review of not only the facts and circumstances of this case to deal with any issues of misconduct, negligence or error, but also to examine our policies, procedures and training that direct the work of the Parole Board and others involved in these decisions to ensure that it is appropriate to prevent this from happening again.

We are very open to making changes to ensure that people have the appropriate training so the right decisions can be made.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Paul-Hus Conservative Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, today I moved a motion calling for Parliament to condemn the Parole Board's decision to allow a violent murderer to receive sexual services.

We are also asking the Liberal government to instruct the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security to conduct hearings into this matter.

Marylène Levesque did not deserve to come to this tragic end. We owe it to her to get to the bottom of this business. One question remains: How much longer will it take the Prime Minister to fire the two board members?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Scarborough Southwest Ontario

Liberal

Bill Blair LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, in the first part of the motion brought forward by the member opposite, unfortunately he makes an assumption that is not supported by the facts.

However, let me be very clear that our government supports the full examination of this matter by the public safety committee, and we will be supporting the motion for that reason.

Canada Revenue AgencyOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Yves-François Blanchet Bloc Beloeil—Chambly, QC

Mr. Speaker, with respect to the new free trade agreement, the government's main, if not only, argument in recent days and weeks has been that the Premier of Quebec asked that it be ratified quickly.

There seems to be a burst of enthusiasm for what Quebec wants. I wonder whether this sudden enthusiasm will lead the government to also approve a motion unanimously adopted by the National Assembly on May 15, 2018, regarding a single tax return.

Canada Revenue AgencyOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Gaspésie—Les-Îles-de-la-Madeleine Québec

Liberal

Diane Lebouthillier LiberalMinister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, let me reassure my colleague. There will be no single tax return.

Our government will continue to require federal tax returns in order to protect jobs in Quebec's regions and respond to francophones across Canada.

That is why we will continue working very hard with Revenu Québec, an important partner.