House of Commons Hansard #88 of the 43rd Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was years.

Topics

Financial Statement of Minister of FinanceThe BudgetGovernment Orders

1:45 p.m.

Liberal

Kody Blois Liberal Kings—Hants, NS

Madam Speaker, I, like the member opposite, understand the importance of agriculture, but I want to correct the record. There were almost $400 million in the fall economic statement for greening initiatives in agriculture to support the work that is already going on, and there are almost $400 million more in the budget, so I was a little disappointed in his remarks.

The member mentioned our price on pollution. I am curious as to what he says to his constituents when he talks about the Conservative carbon tax. Does he thinks that is a program that will actually help individuals. They are focusing on larger emitters. Who does he think those costs are going to get passed on to? It will be the average person and the average farmer.

Why does he think it is a good idea for a Conservative government to tell individuals how to go about spending their own money? Our plan returns the money to individuals. Ironically, the Conservatives want a big government plan where they have savings accounts for every individual.

Could the member opine on what he tells his constituents?

Financial Statement of Minister of FinanceThe BudgetGovernment Orders

1:45 p.m.

Conservative

Terry Dowdall Conservative Simcoe—Grey, ON

Madam Speaker, in my riding there are many farmers with many types of farming operations and each and every one of them is frustrated. As many members know, Conservatives had a couple of bills before the House to assist farmers, whether it was to get rid of the carbon tax for farmers or to pass farms on to family members, hopefully making it a little more enticing and keeping people in the industry.

I do not know where he is getting his facts that people are happy with the supposed funding that farmers are getting. A lot of it does not seem to be trickling down to the farmers in my area. However, I can say that when farmers get their bills, the increase because of the carbon tax is astronomical. As I said in my speech, farmers have two options. Sometimes they are tied into the price—

Financial Statement of Minister of FinanceThe BudgetGovernment Orders

1:45 p.m.

NDP

The Assistant Deputy Speaker NDP Carol Hughes

I have to allow time for more questions.

Continuing with questions and comments, the hon. member for Beauport—Limoilou has the floor.

Financial Statement of Minister of FinanceThe BudgetGovernment Orders

1:45 p.m.

Bloc

Julie Vignola Bloc Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Madam Speaker, as my colleague pointed out, large sums of money are earmarked for distribution in the budget, yet some sectors seem to have been forgotten.

The budget seems to leave out SMEs, especially those in the arts, culture and tourism sectors.

What does my colleague think about the abrupt, unilateral termination of support measures like the wage subsidy, when these businesses need them to continue until 2022?

Financial Statement of Minister of FinanceThe BudgetGovernment Orders

1:45 p.m.

Conservative

Terry Dowdall Conservative Simcoe—Grey, ON

Madam Speaker, I agree that certain industries have been hit extremely hard during this pandemic. We will have to make sure we find a way to continue to take care of them. That is very important.

Part of the problem today is that it took so long to change the commercial rent subsidy so that tenants could receive it. A lot of businesses are no longer around because they had to wait so long. As I said in my speech, another big problem, which I am sure you are hearing of in your riding, and which Liberals should be hearing about in their ridings, is the number of businesses that opened in the past year that are getting no funding. I do not know how any government could feel good about the fact that we are picking winners and losers.

Financial Statement of Minister of FinanceThe BudgetGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

NDP

The Assistant Deputy Speaker NDP Carol Hughes

I want to remind the member that he is to address all questions and comments through the Chair and not to the individual member.

We have time for a brief question. The hon. member for Winnipeg Centre.

Financial Statement of Minister of FinanceThe BudgetGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

NDP

Leah Gazan NDP Winnipeg Centre, MB

Madam Speaker, what we have learned during the pandemic is that, when we do not look after all people and when we fail to address social inequality and inequities, we place the whole population at risk. People are falling through the cracks. We know this. It is exacerbating the severity of the pandemic. This includes seniors, yet the Liberal government let their rich friends off the hook and chose not to include a GLBI, a guaranteed livable basic income, in the budget. According to the PBO, a GLBI would lift over half of the population out of poverty, including many seniors.

Does my hon. colleague support implementing a GLBI as a way to lift seniors out of poverty?

Financial Statement of Minister of FinanceThe BudgetGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

Conservative

Terry Dowdall Conservative Simcoe—Grey, ON

Madam Speaker, the number one calls I consistently receive in my office, even pre-pandemic, are those from seniors who are falling behind. I believe we are not doing enough. We need to do more for our seniors moving forward. The seniors in my riding are all extremely frustrated. Certainly, we, as a country, have to look after them. They have paid into taxes for years and years, and they made this country as great as it is today.

Financial Statement of Minister of FinanceThe BudgetGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

Conservative

Rachael Harder Conservative Lethbridge, AB

Madam Speaker, I would like to begin by congratulating my colleague on being the first female Canadian finance minister to introduce a budget in the House of Commons. Though we are on opposite sides of the House, it is phenomenal. I do want to acknowledge that.

Although I am glad the government finally decided to introduce a budget after more than two years, it must be pointed out that we are the only country in the G7 that went this long without one. Despite the unprecedented amount of government spending that has taken place, it is only now that we are being presented with a spending plan. This, I believe, is absolutely unacceptable.

It certainly does not speak of a government that is striving for openness, transparency and accountability, as it often advertises. I recognize there has been a pandemic, but nearly every other government in the country, whether provincial and municipal, has put forward a budget during this time. If they were able to do so, then surely the Liberal government was also able to do the same.

Before the budget was tabled, constituents shared with me that they were hoping to see a real plan for economic recovery and for reopening society as we know it. They were hoping for a restoration of hope and confidence in our future. Those who are unemployed shared with me that they were hoping to see a plan to create new jobs and economic opportunities for their families.

Those in the oil and gas sector shared with me that they were hoping to see some support for this world-class industry. Those who own local businesses and create jobs were hoping they would no longer have to be on the verge of permanently closing their doors. They were hoping that proper supports would be offered to them and that we would go back to normal.

Sadly, what the Liberal government delivered was a 700-page budget that will increase Canada's debt load by $1.3 trillion by 2022 and includes very little for those who call Alberta home. This is not stimulus spending focused on creating jobs, but rather spending on Liberal partisan priorities. Although there are some necessary support measures contained in this budget for Canadians who are still getting through the economic challenges due to the pandemic, it goes well beyond what is necessary. This is like the government going to Gucci when it really should be going to Walmart. It is not going with its own credit card. It is going with ours, the Canadian people. This is the deal: The government racks up the debt, and Canadians foot the bill.

A strategic budget would have targeted revenue-generating industries in our country so that one dollar would turn into three dollars. Instead, we see massive amounts of cash being flushed through the country in a manner that benefits the current government's partisan interests, rather than the well-being of Canadians as a whole. The budget will extend the pandemic economic recession longer than necessary due to its exorbitant spending.

Canada is in a rough situation right now. People are hurting emotionally, psychologically, economically and physically. That must be acknowledged. Canadians are looking for a way out, a change, not more of the same. Sadly, that is what this budget is.

It is a perpetuation of our current fiscal state where unemployment rates are high, government handouts are a primary source of income and the human spirit is severely damaged. It is a superficial solution that does not fix the real problem of a struggling economy and a struggling people. This was an opportunity for the government to chart a course toward a return to pre-COVID times. Of course, I would propose 2014 to take that opportunity, but that said, I would take 2019 at this point.

Instead, we see a Liberal government that is extending the pandemic economic recovery efforts with this budget. This will put us at a serious competitive disadvantage globally, especially when we see other countries returning to normal. Their economic engines are running again and ours is being flooded with no hope of a jump start. It is hard not to be envious of countries such as the United States, where concerts are taking place on Fridays, sports stadiums are full on Saturdays and churches are bustling with life on Sundays. In Taiwan, life is basically back to normal and has been for a long time due to its rapid response to the virus. It had a total of 1,100 cases and only 12 deaths. That is amazing.

The current government seems to wear federal debt as a badge of honour. It is bizarre and troubling. More borrowing and spending does not equate to good governance. Under the Prime Minister, Canada has incurred the largest per capita deficit and hit the highest unemployment rate in the G7, which means Canada has spent the most to achieve the least. Money spent is not a measuring stick for success as much as the government would like to use it as such. Lowering the unemployment rate or growing our national GDP are things that are worth celebrating and using as measures of success.

Just a few weeks before the Liberal budget was tabled, the Deputy Prime Minister said, “I really believe COVID has created a window of political opportunity”. This mentality is truly shocking and troublesome, but it also explains how the Liberals view this pandemic. They see it as an opportunity to re-engineer society according to their value set. It is exploitive and wrong.

The Prime Minister's “reimagined economy” is a risky Ottawa-knows-best approach that picks winners and losers by design. He is dictating which jobs, sectors and regions of our country will stay afloat and prosper and which will be left to perish. Never before has there been such a divisive prime minister in this nation.

Canadians know the government has no money of its own. Anything the government spends comes from taxes and borrowing. What the government borrows, Canadians pay back through taxation. There is no such thing as a free lunch, regardless of how the government tries to package it. The thing about government spending is that it always comes back to the people at a significant cost. It is common knowledge that when taxes go up, an unfriendly or even hostile environment is created for business. High taxes result in businesses leaving the country for other jurisdictions where they are not taxed to fill government coffers. The problem with businesses leaving the country is that they take jobs with them. When they take jobs with them, they also take the revenue that the government relies on for the social safety net that Canadians enjoy so much. This results in higher unemployment and more Canadians being dependent on the government for support, as opposed to being independent and self-sufficient because they have jobs. This pattern is extremely detrimental to the Canadian people, but highly beneficial for a political party that only maintains power when Canadians are dependent on government.

Instead of working to get Canadians out of the dole line, it seems as though the Liberals are doing everything in their power to prolong the current situation and to capitalize on an obliged and increasingly indebted electorate. So much federal money has been spent on COVID-19 benefit programs that, on average, Canadians now have more personal income than they did pre-COVID, even though the average employment income has fallen dramatically.

Let us talk about big government. This is not a budget that a responsible government would put forward: It is a budget that sets up an opportunistic Prime Minister for success in the event of an election. Notably, despite the massive debt incurred, this budget failed in a few key areas. There is no plan to fight the pandemic. This is interesting, because the Prime Minister touted this budget as his pandemic response. There is no new money for health care transfers, no fiscal anchor or debt-management strategy. That is atrocious for a national budget.

Canada needs a prime minister who sees the solution to our country's current challenges and where they truly lie. It is not the government—

Financial Statement of Minister of FinanceThe BudgetGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

NDP

The Assistant Deputy Speaker NDP Carol Hughes

I have to interrupt the hon. member. She will have two minutes to continue her speech before questions and comments afterward as we have run out of time at this point.

Statements by Members, the hon. member for Mississauga—Lakeshore.

Mississauga Doctor RetiresStatements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Sven Spengemann Liberal Mississauga—Lakeshore, ON

Madam Speaker, I would like to recognize a long-serving, much-loved physician in Mississauga, Dr. Edric Sum and to congratulate him on his retirement.

Dr. Sum was born in Wuhan, China after World War II and moved to Hong Kong with his family. He graduated from the University of Hong Kong's Medical School, and came to Canada to pursue further training in pediatrics. Like so many of us, Dr. Sum decided to make Canada his home. He began to practise medicine in Mississauga in 1974, and later served as Secretary of the Department of Family Medicine of the then Mississauga Hospital.

Dr. Sum looked after my family and me for many years, alongside thousands of other Mississauga residents for whom he cared over the decades. His younger daughter followed her father's passion and is practising psychiatry in Scarborough.

I extend my sincerest thanks to Dr. Sum for his extraordinary service to our community. I ask all members of the House to join me in wishing him a long, healthy and fulfilling retirement.

COVID-19 Emergency ResponseStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Kerry Diotte Conservative Edmonton Griesbach, AB

Madam Speaker, my constituents are angry. They are angry because the Prime Minister and his Liberals have done a terrible job of fighting COVID. They have failed.

Let us count the ways. First, they failed from the get-go to recognize COVID as a pandemic. Second, they refused early on to stop flights from COVID hot spots. Third, they shipped 16 tonnes of vital PPE to Communist China, when Canadians needed it. Fourth, they gambled that a deal with Communist China would get us vaccines. It failed. Now we are still way behind other countries on vaccinations. Fifth, they failed on contact tracing. Sixth, they failed on rapid testing.

There are real consequences for these failures: massive unemployment, constant lockdowns, sickness and death. Canada is renowned for world-class health care, but the Liberals have failed us. Canadians deserve better.

For Our KidsStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Chandra Arya Liberal Nepean, ON

Madam Speaker, I recently had the great privilege of meeting with members of For Our Kids, including Ms. Emily Gray, Dr. Tonja Stothart and Dr. Sarah Sloan.

For Our Kids is an Ottawa-based climate advocacy group representing hundreds of parents across the Ottawa-Gatineau area. It is associated with a network of thousands of other mothers, fathers and grandparents across Canada. Together, they are rightly concerned with the well-being of their children and grandchildren due to the climate emergency that faces our country and the world.

I was inspired by their message that with all these crises, we need to build political will. We need to work together as politicians and as leaders to avert the climate crisis.

I thank For Our Kids again for its continued advocacy.

Dr. Pierre LapointeStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Marie-Hélène Gaudreau Bloc Laurentides—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, today I want to pay tribute to Dr. Pierre Lapointe from Val-David, in the wonderful Pays-d'en-Haut RCM.

Dr. Lapointe has been a rural physician for nearly 40 years, playing an invaluable role in the community. He started his career in Rivière-Rouge, before moving to Labelle, in my beautiful riding of Laurentides—Labelle. Everyone appreciates his dedication and sympathetic ear. Dr. Lapointe is active and involved in the community, having served as mayor of Val-David.

He has been practising medicine at the Val-Morin health care co-operative for the past 10 years and is the only doctor for more than 1,800 people. I wish him many more years of good health, since he wants to remain active for a long time.

I want to express our support, on behalf of all of his patients. Thank you, Dr. Lapointe, for continuing to care for us.

Appalachian CorridorStatements By Members

April 26th, 2021 / 2 p.m.

Liberal

Lyne Bessette Liberal Brome—Missisquoi, QC

Mr. Speaker, Thursday was Earth Day. I want to mark the occasion by acknowledging the excellent nature conservation work being done in Brome—Missisquoi.

Since 2002, the organization Appalachian Corridor has been working to increase the acreage of protected natural areas in the Eastern Townships. The group recently finalized the purchase of 125 hectares of Mont Foster to protect it in perpetuity. This land will be added to the 15,000-plus hectares the organization has already saved over the years. Thanks to this purchase, no less than a dozen species at risk will be able to maintain their natural habitat.

Fortunately, the achievements of Appalachian Corridor have not gone unnoticed. The organization earned an Eastern Townships environmental award of excellence. Its conservation efforts are a true gift to future generations and I will always be there to support initiatives that preserve the wonders of our region.

In closing, I want to thank Mélanie Lelièvre and the entire Appalachian Corridor team for their excellent work.

The BudgetStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Scot Davidson Conservative York—Simcoe, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal budget is a massive lunch box letdown for York—Simcoe residents.

The budget raises taxes on families, with no plan to create jobs or support small businesses. It lets down pensioners in Pefferlaw, who are on fixed incomes and struggling to overcome the rising costs of living. It lets down young families in East Gwillimbury, whose dreams of owning a home are being pushed further and further away. It lets down farmers in the Holland Marsh, who are taking on immense financial risks with no measures in place to protect them or safeguard our food supply.

The budget also fails to fund critical infrastructure projects and to support environmental initiatives such as the Lake Simcoe cleanup fund. It is also shameful that in the middle of the pandemic there was no increased support for health care. It is clear with this budget that the Liberal plan is not working for York—Simcoe residents. That is why Conservatives are focused on ensuring that all Canadians can create better lives for their children.

Newfoundland and Labrador Chief Medical OfficerStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Churence Rogers Liberal Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, NL

Mr. Speaker, it gives me tremendous pleasure today to recognize Newfoundland and Labrador's chief medical officer, Dr. Janice Fitzgerald. She has worked tirelessly to help our province navigate safely through the COVID-19 pandemic, has prevented many widespread breakouts from happening and saved countless lives.

Because of her work ethic and quick responses to situations, Dr. Fitzgerald is being honoured in her, and my, hometown of Centreville-Wareham-Trinity. Mayor Gibbons and the town are naming a popular lookout in Blacks Brook Park in her honour.

I cannot think of anybody more deserving of this dedication than Dr. Fitzgerald, especially since the lookout is just above her childhood home. Soon residents and visitors alike will be able to visit Dr. Fitzgerald Hold Fast Lookout and always remember the service and dedication she has given to our province.

Please join me in sending our sincere thanks and congratulations to Newfoundland's hero, Dr. Janice Fitzgerald.

Child CareStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Francis Drouin Liberal Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House virtually to commend our Minister of Finance for her efforts to ensure that parents in Canada are able to fully participate in our economy.

Too often, because of a lack of resources, new mothers have to put their careers on hold to take care of their children. My mother had to go back to work after a three-month maternity leave, and I was lucky enough that my grandmother was able to care for me. However, I know that is not an option for every mother.

Budget 2021 will correct that injustice. An early child care program that will cut the cost of child care in half by next year and that will bring the average cost of child care down to $10 a day by 2025 is a policy that will transform our society.

When we invest in measures that enable everyone to participate in the development of our country, we end up with not only a feminist budget but also a more just and equal society.

On behalf of parents in Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, I want to thank the Minister of Finance and the Prime Minister.

Mario GrenierStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Conservative Lévis—Lotbinière, QC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to my friend Mario Grenier, an extraordinary man who left us far too soon.

It was a shared passion for politics that brought us together as friends. Mario was the mayor of Saint-Sylvestre, in the Lotbinière RCM, for 25 years, and a municipal councillor for 10 years before that. He therefore dedicated 35 years of his life to municipal politics.

He was, without question, the leader of a dynamic and committed community. At work in his business, he always had a friendly smile and cherished the daily interactions he had with the people of his community.

On behalf of the entire community of Lévis—Lotbinière, I extend my sympathies to his wife Angèle, his children Stéphanie and Vincent and their spouses, as well as his grandchildren. Mario was a caring husband, and a devoted father and grandfather to his family, whom he loved dearly. Mario left a significant tangible mark on his community through his achievements and determination, not to mention his great joie de vivre. Now it is up to us to keep a special place in our hearts for him.

In memory of Mario, rest in peace, my friend.

ArmeniaStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Annie Koutrakis Liberal Vimy, QC

Mr. Speaker, on April 24, Armenians in Canada and around the world participated in a solemn commemoration of the 106th anniversary of the Armenian genocide.

In a matter of two years, the Turkish Ottoman Empire's systemic ethnic cleansing campaign took the lives of around 1.5 million people and forced around one million others to flee their homes.

Like many Canadians, I have close, personal ties to the Armenian community. Growing up, I learned of the Armenian genocide through stories shared by many best childhood friend, Nivarat Mardikyan, and family members who had seen the impact of these atrocities first-hand. These stories remind us of what human beings are capable of when driven by hate.

Today and everyday, let us reflect on the lives lost to genocide and recommit ourselves to standing against human rights abuse in all forms. We must never repeat the mistakes of the past. Lest we forget.

“Secure the Environment” PlanStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Alain Rayes Conservative Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, our leader recently presented our ambitious environmental platform. The independent analysis by Navius Research confirmed that this plan would both create jobs and help us meet the Paris Agreement targets.

Instead of taxing Canadians and putting the money into government coffers, we are creating an open savings account for Canadians, who will be able to take concrete action for the environment and will incentivize everyone to adopt a greener lifestyle. There are also measures to increase the number of electric vehicles on our roads, reduce industrial emissions, protect our forests and waterways, ensure sustainable agriculture and more.

The Conservatives have a concrete and realistic plan that will have a real impact on our planet and on people's lives. I invite Canadians and Quebeckers to learn about our environmental plan. Together, we can make a difference. Together, we can take action for the environment.

The EconomyStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Richard Bragdon Conservative Tobique—Mactaquac, NB

Mr. Speaker, the COVID-19 pandemic has affected every Canadian across our great country. We as parliamentarians have a responsibility to be thinking ahead to how best to position Canada to thrive coming out of COVID.

The Conservatives understand the importance of jobs. Many have lost their jobs or have seen a reduction in their work. Canada has so much to offer. We grow and produce some of the best and safest food. We have tremendous manufacturing capacity that can put people to work and produce high-quality Canadian products to be sold both here and around the world. We produce some of the cleanest and most efficiently harvested natural resources in energy that can supply the world's needs. We have a healthy and sustainable fishery that can supply an ever-growing demand for high-quality and sustainably sourced seafood. We have the infrastructure and the vital personnel in our truckers to get our goods to market both in Canada and abroad.

Canada has so much potential to thrive coming out of COVID if the proper steps are taken now to secure Canada's jobs, to secure Canada's economy and to secure Canada's future. That is exactly what we as Conservatives plan to do.

Former Leader of the Ontario New Democratic PartyStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Jagmeet Singh NDP Burnaby South, BC

Mr. Speaker, today, it is with great honour that I am able to share some words with the House about an incredible fellow New Democrat, a leader, someone who is a humanitarian, a diplomat and a scholar.

Stephen Lewis has lifted the lives of millions of people and someone who continues to inspire future generations of progressive leaders. He right now is battling a very serious illness, but he does not want us to talk about that illness. He does not want us to talk about him. He wants us to do what he has always advocated for, speaking about people who need help the most.

Recently, Stephen Lewis has indicated exactly who those people are: people who come from low-income countries that are not able to afford the vaccines to fight this global pandemic. We stood shoulder to shoulder recently, fighting against big pharma and urging the Liberal government to give these countries a fighting chance against the pandemic.

The same way Stephen Lewis throughout his life has shared love and compassion for others, the same way he has stood for people, today I want Stephen Lewis and his family to know that we stand with them.

Mobiles NewspaperStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Simon-Pierre Savard-Tremblay Bloc Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, in 2004, a new community paper called Mobiles was published for the first time in Saint-Hyacinthe. Now, in 2021, Mobiles is a monthly paper that reaches 55,000 readers in print, 114,000 readers online and 20,000 Facebook followers. Mobiles covers a broad range of topics and is a fixture in our community. The people of Saint-Hyacinthe are proud of their dynamic local paper.

Last week, three of Mobiles's finest were honoured at the Association des médias écrits communautaires du Québec gala. Guillaume Mousseau, the paper's marketing director, won the digital engagement award for the second year running. Reporter Roger Lafrance won first place in the interview category, and Carl Vaillancourt took third in the reporting category.

On behalf of the Bloc Québécois, I would like to extend my hearty and sincere congratulations to Mobiles for its latest accolades at the AMECQ gala.

Garrett CummingStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

James Cumming Conservative Edmonton Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to rise today to speak of an extraordinary individual and constituent who left us on March 5. He lived life to the fullest and accomplished more than most would in 35 years. He lived his life with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which provided challenges but never defined him. He managed to complete two degrees, travel the world and was an enormous inspiration to many.

This remarkable young man's name is Garrett Cumming, and he is our son. He wrote a piece years ago that is framed on my desk about me as his role model, but he did not realize that he had it backward.

Today, I would also like to recognize a physician, a Dr. House of sorts. Dr. Lyle McGonigle started as a vet, realized after having kids that he could provide better care and returned to school to become a pediatrician. Dr. M. told Garrett, “I will see you for as long as you want”, and that is what he did. He and his team offered Garrett straight, no-nonsense talk, always combined with compassion and care.

Garrett had a team of caregivers over the years who not only provided for his personal care, but assisted with his courses, travel and, most important, caring and companionship.

I thank the front-line workers.

Garrett is missed.