House of Commons Hansard #112 of the 43rd Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was documents.

Topics

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Mumilaaq Qaqqaq NDP Nunavut, NU

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister, the head of Canada, likes to use buzzwords like “reconciliation” to look good on the world stage without actually fulfilling basic human rights on Canadian soil. The Government of Canada destroyed records on residential schools, erasing vital information. The Catholic church holds the remaining records on these institutions.

If indigenous lives are so important, as the Prime Minister likes to portray, why would he not do everything in his power instead of taking knees and making apologies? Why will the government not force the church to provide information that is rightfully ours?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Toronto—St. Paul's Ontario

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett LiberalMinister of Crown-Indigenous Relations

Mr. Speaker, I totally agree with the member, except for the destruction of documents by the Canadian government, which were all handed over to the National Centre on Truth and Reconciliation.

The residential school survivors and those dealing with it need to hear the Pope apologize explicitly for the Catholic Church's role in this tragedy to unlock the healing and support closure. The Prime Minister formally requested an apology when he met with Pope Francis at the Vatican, and our government continues to call on the Pope to apologize and to release all relevant documents. The Pope's statement on Sunday does not go far enough. The—

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

The hon. member for Winnipeg Centre.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Leah Gazan NDP Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, it took two years after the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls for the government to release a national action plan without an implementation schedule, what Professor Pam Palmater has deemed, “That's code for we didn't come up with a plan”. Chief Judy Wilson of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs has called it another “flowery reconciliation speeches that fall short in action”, referring to it as a government delay tactic.

What date will the government release an implementation plan and finally act to end genocide against indigenous women, girls and two-spirit?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Toronto—St. Paul's Ontario

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett LiberalMinister of Crown-Indigenous Relations

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for her ongoing advocacy. Our hearts are always with the survivors and families of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls and two-spirited, LGBTQQIA+ people.

On June 3, we were with all the contributing partners across Canada when they came together to release the national action plan and the federal pathway to finally end the ongoing tragedy. This is supported by budget 2021, with $2.2 billion over five years to implement the concrete measures that will truly keep indigenous women and girls and two-spirited, LGBTQQIA+ people safe.

Small BusinessOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Patrick Weiler Liberal West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country, BC

Mr. Speaker, the pandemic-related lockdown measures dealt a hard blow to the tourism and hospitality sector, the backbone of the economy of West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country. Small businesses throughout my riding have been clear that the Canada emergency wage subsidy has been a lifeline without which they would have had to close their doors for good.

As restrictions on gathering are lifted and our economy can safely reopen, businesses are planning to hire more staff and do their part in creating well-paying middle-class jobs. Could the minister share what this government is doing to support them?

Small BusinessOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Markham—Thornhill Ontario

Liberal

Mary Ng LiberalMinister of Small Business

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleague from West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country for his strong advocacy for small businesses.

We have been there for businesses every step of the way in this pandemic. On the road to recovery, we are investing $600 million with the Canada recovery hiring program. This will help businesses hire new workers, hire back workers or increase the hours and wages of existing workers and support a quicker recovery.

We are going to continue to be there for Canadian businesses and workers.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Michael Chong Conservative Wellington—Halton Hills, ON

Mr. Speaker, I ask this question yet again. President Biden ordered U.S. intelligence to investigate two likely theories on the origin of the coronavirus: one that it originated from human contact with an infected animal, or the other that it came from a lab accident at the Wuhan Institute of Virology.

The government says that it supports the U.S. investigation. Given that government scientists at the Winnipeg lab worked closely with the Wuhan lab, will U.S. investigators have access to these government scientists and their relevant documents, including lab notes?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount Québec

Liberal

Marc Garneau LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as my colleague rightly pointed out, we support President Biden's call to fully investigate the origin of the COVID virus using the best science and information available. We in Canada will help in any way we can.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Michael Chong Conservative Wellington—Halton Hills, ON

Mr. Speaker, perhaps the government can start helping by answering questions that we have been asking about the national security breaches at the Winnipeg lab. Clearly, there were breaches and we need answers.

When will it start answering the questions we are asking: Why were the two government scientists fired from the Winnipeg lab? Where are these two government scientists? How did a Chinese military scientist get access to this top level lab in Winnipeg? Were there any unauthorized transfers of materials from Winnipeg to Wuhan?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Thunder Bay—Superior North Ontario

Liberal

Patty Hajdu LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I have written to the chair of the NSICOP committee to refer this issue to the appropriate place to study these questions. As well, the agency has provided the committee the unredacted documents through the House clerk.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Paul-Hus Conservative Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, Canada has an agreement with China that allowed Dr. Qiu to send information and virus samples to the Wuhan Institute of Virology.

In 2019, less than two months after Dr. Qiu coordinated a shipment of several viruses to China, including Ebola, she was escorted out of the National Microbiology Lab and the RCMP opened an investigation. It is obvious that Dr. Qiu was fired for a far more serious reason than shipping virus samples in accordance with established protocols.

Canadians have concerns, and they want to know why the Prime Minister is not telling them the truth.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Thunder Bay—Superior North Ontario

Liberal

Patty Hajdu LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, on the contrary, as the member opposite probably just heard, I have written to the chair of the NSICOP committee, which is the appropriate level of security to review items of national security. I have referred this issue to the chair. As well, the agency has provided the unredacted documents to the House clerk to work with that committee.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Paul-Hus Conservative Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, I see that the minister is trying to refer this issue to the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, but that is not a regular parliamentary committee.

We now know that China stole Canadian intellectual property concerning the development of vaccines through CanSino and is now attacking our top secret laboratories.

When the recipients in Beijing received Dr. Qiu's package on April 1, 2019, they sent us an email stating, “Looking forward to our further cooperation in the future”.

If we were already co-operating, what did Dr. Qiu mean? Is the Prime Minister trying to hide information from Canadians?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Thunder Bay—Superior North Ontario

Liberal

Patty Hajdu LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, researchers across the country have been working together and, indeed, with other international researchers to understand COVID-19, to develop vaccines, to create testing and screening equipment, and understand the virus as it evolves.

As the member knows, in this particular situation, these researchers are no longer with the lab. In fact, the director of the lab has been very clear that there is no connection with their departure and COVID-19.

It is irresponsible of the member to try and draw that link. I have referred this item to the appropriate committee with the appropriate level of security to review the documents.

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Martin Champoux Bloc Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, 30 years have passed since the Broadcasting Act was last updated. That was before social media.

Back in 1991, a “web giant” meant a massive spider in a horror movie. The Internet was slow as molasses, and people were more likely to have pagers than cell phones. Thirty years ago, the Conservative Party still had the word “progressive” in its name.

My question is for the heritage minister. Does he think we can afford to waste even more time before we pass Bill C-10 to modernize the Broadcasting Act?

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Laurier—Sainte-Marie Québec

Liberal

Steven Guilbeault LiberalMinister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague for his question.

The answer to his question is very simple. No, we cannot afford to waste any more time before passing Bill C-10. Every month that goes by costs our artists, musicians and technicians $70 million. We are losing $70 million a month. We have to pass Bill C-10 as quickly as possible.

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Martin Champoux Bloc Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, the member for Lethbridge told an Alberta newspaper that Quebec artists support Bill C-10 because they are outdated and rely on government grants as they are not able to make a living off of the art they are producing. She added that Canadians do not want the songs, films and material these artists produce.

Offering a weak apology on Twitter is not enough to make up for insulting thousands of artists across Quebec and Canada.

Will the minister join us in condemning these ignorant comments, which show a complete lack of knowledge of Quebec culture and unbelievable contempt for Quebec creators, and call on the Leader of the Opposition to apologize for his member's misguided comments?

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Laurier—Sainte-Marie Québec

Liberal

Steven Guilbeault LiberalMinister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, I completely agree with my hon. colleague. The comments made by the member for Lethbridge are unacceptable. She must apologize to the House.

The Leader of the Opposition must also apologize to the House. I am curious to know whether, according to the member for Lethbridge's criteria, Quebec's Michel Charette, who stars in District 31, a show that draws a record-breaking 1.8 million viewers every day, is one of those outdated artists.

Does she think that this is material Canadians do not want? That is unacceptable.

The member for Lethbridge and the Leader of the Opposition must apologize.

Agriculture and Agri-foodOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Lianne Rood Conservative Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government consultation period for the Canada Grain Act ended on April 30. My colleagues and I have heard from many stakeholders who participated in the consultations. On May 13, I sent the Minister of Agriculture a letter explaining that stakeholders are frustrated because of the lack of information available to them regarding the government's next steps.

When will the government tell the stakeholders what the plan is and offer a timeline for releasing the results of the consultation?

Agriculture and Agri-foodOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Compton—Stanstead Québec

Liberal

Marie-Claude Bibeau LiberalMinister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, I can assure my colleague that we conducted in-depth consultations with stakeholders across the country and we had a great response.

Departmental officials are drafting a report summarizing all of these consultations. We will then have to conduct further studies, because we want to make evidence-based recommendations. Reviewing the Canada Grain Act is a priority for us.

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

June 7th, 2021 / 2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Richard Lehoux Conservative Beauce, QC

Mr. Speaker, it has now been over a month since I sent the immigration minister an open letter, co-signed by 14 businesses in my region, to speak out about the endless delays and unnecessary red tape involved in processing applications from foreign workers. These businesses are waiting for landscapers, welders, mechanics and machinists, and they no longer know where to turn to get their files moving.

Santa Claus is basically their last chance. At least he answers all the letters he receives.

Will the minister finally take action for the good of these businesses?

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence Ontario

Liberal

Marco Mendicino LiberalMinister of Immigration

Mr. Speaker, we are on track to reach the threshold established by Quebec in 2021, which includes the family class and temporary foreign workers. We have also added resources. We implemented reunification policies, which are proof of our progress and our work.

I will continue to work with my colleague to ensure that these businesses are able to bring in all the immigrants they need.

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Joël Godin Conservative Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, QC

Mr. Speaker, the end of the pandemic is in sight, and thousands of businesses want to participate in the economic recovery. Unfortunately, the Liberal government is unable to find solutions to help these men and women who want to save their businesses by hiring foreign workers.

Setting aside the statistics and the many months of waiting, can the government take measures to give these businesses quick access to labour and thus support hard-working individuals and business owners in Canada?

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

3 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence Ontario

Liberal

Marco Mendicino LiberalMinister of Immigration

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the member opposite for his important question.

This year, we have already admitted approximately 8,500 skilled workers to Quebec, along with thousands of foreign workers. Not only are we going to meet the immigration thresholds established by the Government of Quebec in 2021, but we are also going to recover from the pandemic.

We will always work in co-operation with the Government of Quebec to support the economic recovery.