House of Commons Hansard #85 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was recall.

Topics

Criminal Code
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Paul Forseth New Westminster—Burnaby, BC

Mr. Speaker, last week the minister stated that the review of section 43 was merely part of a general review. In June 1991 the former Minister of Justice stated that $7.1 million would be devoted to

a three-year study. The three years is now up. In March the Toronto Star reported that 70 per cent of Canadian parents felt that physical discipline was sometimes needed for effective parenting.

What are the reasons for the government to interfere with the freedom of parents to effectively raise their children by spending significant amounts of taxpayers' money on reviewing legislation which a majority of parents feel should remain the same?

Criminal Code
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I have no intention of elaborating upon objectives that may have been in the mind of the last government or a previous minister.

Instead, I will concentrate on the purpose of the study at the justice department. As I have said, it is linked directly to our international obligations to ensure that our domestic laws reflect the accord among all civilized nations of the world that we prohibit the use of excessive force against children. That is exactly what we are looking at in this study.

Illegal Dismissal
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Christiane Gagnon Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Justice. On April 20, the Federal Court rendered a decision on Ms. Pitawanakwat's case. She was dismissed by the former Department of the Secretary of State in March 1986. The court concluded that her dismissal was illegal and due only to racial discrimination against this native woman. Despite this victory and eight years of legal proceedings, the government still refuses to reach a negotiated settlement on the amount of compensation, among other things.

Can the Minister of Justice tell us if he intends to settle with Mary Pitawanakwat before the deadline of June 17 set by the parties for reaching an agreement?

Illegal Dismissal
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I can tell the hon. member that we are very much aware of the need to reach a resolution of this case at the earliest possible time.

I met with Mary Pitawanakwat last Thursday in Regina and yesterday here in Ottawa when she was present for the National Action Committee on the Status of Women meeting. I assured her that through counsel at the Department of Justice and her own lawyer we are committed to the negotiation of the resolution of all outstanding claims as soon as possible. I have satisfied myself that those negotiations are continuing.

Following the court judgment in April we received instructions from the client department, the department of heritage, to enter into negotiations which have resulted already in some measure of agreement. There are still issues outstanding and we are working toward their resolution at the earliest possible time.

Illegal Dismissal
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Christiane Gagnon Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, how can the Minister of Justice explain that a seriously ill woman who has two children and was dismissed illegally must use all her resources and all her energy in court for eight years to obtain justice?

Illegal Dismissal
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, my familiarity is particularly with respect to those months since this government has been in office and I can tell the hon. member that, as I already have mentioned, we are committed to the earliest possible resolution of his case, particularly in light of all the circumstances of which we are very much aware.

Dairy Farming
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

David Iftody Provencher, MB

Mr. Speaker, my question is to the minister of agriculture. The standing committee on agriculture has a report with recommendations on the BST which must now be addressed.

Specifically the report addresses the one-year moratorium on the sale and distribution of this hormone product that was requested by the committee.

When will the minister respond as required by the rules of this House and provide Canadian dairy farmers with some certainty on this important matter?

Dairy Farming
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Regina—Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, first of all I would like to acknowledge the very hard work on the BST issue that was done earlier this spring by the standing committee of agriculture of this House.

On the precise issue of licensing or the matter of whether to issue a notice of compliance, I would advise the House that issue is fully and entirely within the jurisdiction of the Minister of Health. I know the Minister of Health will be making her decision in accordance with all the applicable laws and regulations in due course and that matter is entirely within her purview.

With respect to the government's specific response to the recommendations of the standing committee, I have not had the opportunity yet to consider those recommendations with my Cabinet colleagues but I do expect to have that opportunity

soon. While I cannot absolutely guarantee it, I would hope to be able to provide the House with the necessary response under the rules of the House hopefully before the House adjourns on June 23.

Taxation
Oral Question Period

June 14th, 1994 / 2:45 p.m.

Reform

Philip Mayfield Cariboo—Chilcotin, BC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Finance. The present tax system is unfair in its treatment of families. A victim of the current tax system is single income families. The difference in taxation between the single income family in which one parent stays at home to care for their children and the family in which both parents work is substantial and can range from $3,000 to $6,000 per year when the family income is $60,000.

When will the government start to treat all families fairly?

Taxation
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Scarborough East
Ontario

Liberal

Doug Peters Secretary of State (International Financial Institutions)

Mr. Speaker, the tax system in our country has been based on an individual tax system. It is not a family tax system. We do not have joint returns in this family and we do treat all taxpayers as fairly as possible.

Taxation
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Reform

Philip Mayfield Cariboo—Chilcotin, BC

Mr. Speaker, a recent Angus Reid CTV poll indicated that whenever possible caring for children in their homes was the preferred method of child care by Canadians. However, by interfering with family choices and penalizing families with stay at home parents, the current tax system prevents Canadians from achieving their preferred care for children at home.

Will the government introduce a bill to rectify this inequity?

Taxation
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Scarborough East
Ontario

Liberal

Doug Peters Secretary of State (International Financial Institutions)

Mr. Speaker, the matter that is referred to by the hon. member is a question that has come up previously.

I do not think we are going to introduce bills on that particular basis. We have a number of family systems in this country. A large number of people operate from single families, single person families, families in which both parents are working, and the child support part of our tax system is an important aspect to them.

Flags Of Convenience
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Guimond Beauport—Montmorency—Orléans, QC

Mr. Speaker, last week, we asked the Minister of Transport to tell us if some federal government ships were flying a Bahamian flag of convenience. On June 11, the director of public affairs with Marine Atlantic, Mr. Ted Bartlett, confirmed that three of his ships were registered abroad and were flying a foreign flag.

My question is for the Minister of Transport. Since we now have confirmation that three ships from Marine Atlantic, which is wholly-owned by the federal government, are flying a foreign flag, will the minister explain why this is the case?

Flags Of Convenience
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Acadie—Bathurst
New Brunswick

Liberal

Douglas Young Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, first I want to thank the hon. member for raising this issue again, since I just had the opportunity to review it.

It is true that three ships from Marine Atlantic are registered in the Bahamas, but I should point out to the hon. member that this has been the case for several years. I was not aware of that when the issue was first raised in the House. The hon. member could certainly have discussed it with the Leader of the Opposition, since the situation already existed when he was a cabinet member.

We will review the issue, but it is easy to see how it came about. The measure was taken precisely to avoid costs for the Government of Canada.

Flags Of Convenience
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Guimond Beauport—Montmorency—Orléans, QC

Mr. Speaker, could you remind the Minister of Transport that the hon. Leader of the Opposition left the Conservative Party in May 1990, while I will inform the minister that the Bluenose was bought in 1982 and the Marine Evangeline in 1978, under Liberal governments.

Since that dubious practice dates from the Liberal governments of the time, will the minister pledge to this House that such practices will no longer be used?