House of Commons Hansard #96 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was dna.

Topics

Governments
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Reform

Philip Mayfield Cariboo—Chilcotin, BC

Mr. Speaker, some members of the public accounts committee have just returned from Washington, D.C. after meeting with officials of the U.S. government, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the Inter-American Development Bank. The discussions were about increasing government's transparency and accountability and about supporting parliamentarians working to make their governments accountable to their people.

There is a great desire for governments to do what they were elected to do and to spend taxpayer money for the greater good of all the people. Our government in Canada, however, does not seem to share this desire for transparency and accountability. In fact, the treasury board is now gathering its resources to further limit the flow of information to parliament in the name of increased efficiency. We all want efficiency, but not at the expense of democracy and a fully accountable government.

I call on the Government of Canada to listen to those who know from firsthand experience the need for open and accountable government. Canada belongs to all its citizens, not the government. Give the people this respect.

George Findlay
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Rick Limoges Windsor—St. Clair, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize a great Canadian, Mr. George Findlay, a teacher at Princess Elizabeth Public School who received the Prime Minister's Award for Teaching Excellence.

Mr. Findlay inspires his students to stretch academically and to gain a sense of pride and achievement in their work. As a teacher he always prepares his students well for the transition to high school and adult life. Part of Mr. Findlay's teaching philosophy is “Once you are in my class, you are mine for life”.

I commend Mr. Findlay and all of the other award recipients this year for their outstanding teaching and dedication to students everywhere.

Health
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, that the Liberal's allow Alberta's bill 11 to go unanswered is absolutely shameful.

As early as March the NDP tried to table a legal opinion that showed concrete examples of how bill 11 violates the Canada Health Act, but the Liberals blocked us. Our legal opinion says that the enhanced service provisions of bill 11 violate the accessibility principle of medicare because patients can choose an enhanced level of service.

By upgrading the service to include extras, the service then becomes uninsured. Since speed and quality of service would vary according to ability to pay, this creates a two tier system and, as such, violates the accessibility principle in exactly the same way the Calgary eye clinics violate it, and yet for four years the Liberals have not enforced the act on the eye clinics because of the secret 12 point deal.

The fact remains that existing violations go unpunished, bill 11 goes unanswered and the health care system goes to rot under the minister's watch.

The Canada health care system needs a champion. If the minister cannot stand up to Ralph Klein, he should step down, resign and let somebody with courage and conviction take the helm.

Nurses
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Madeleine Dalphond-Guiral Laval Centre, QC

Mr. Speaker, on this International Nurses Day, I am proud to pay tribute to my colleagues, the nurses in Quebec.

Since 1994, in Quebec, we have celebrated Nurses Week. This year the theme is “nurses, expertise from the heart” reflects the commitment by these 65,000 health care professions, who provide quality care for the sick and their families, often under difficult circumstances.

It is not a matter of chance that the nursing profession was third last March among the top professions.

The listing of clinical expertise published by the Ordre des infirmiers et des infirmières du Québec numbers more than 600 projects focussed on the needs of the patients and their families. From all over Quebec, these innovative projects brilliantly illustrate the competence of nurses and their profound desire to provide care that is adapted to the latest technologies and able to meet the needs of an ever more diversified clientele.

To the nurses of Quebec and Canada, on behalf of the Bloc Quebecois, I say thank you. We know we can count on you.

The Late Justice Jules Deschênes
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Robert Bertrand Pontiac—Gatineau—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, Canada lost an eminent jurist on Wednesday, when Jules Deschênes, chief justice of the Quebec superior court, passed away.

We want to recognize, among other initiatives, his support for legal assistance and for a family mediation system, which have allowed Canadian society to make remarkable progress.

Born in Montreal on June 7, 1923, Jules Deschênes studied law at the Université de Montréal and was called to the Bar in 1946.

In March 1972, Mr. Deschênes was appointed directly to the Quebec court of appeal. He was chief justice from 1973 to June 1983. From 1985 to 1987, he chaired a commission of inquiry on war criminals in Canada. From 1993 to 1997, he sat on the international criminal tribunal on war crimes in the Balkans.

Among other distinctions, Jules Deschênes was presented with the Order of Canada, in 1989—

The Late Justice Jules Deschênes
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. member for New Brunswick Southwest.

Environmental Illness
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Greg Thompson Charlotte, NB

Mr. Speaker, today is the international day of recognition for chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia. Approximately 15% of all Canadians suffer from environmental illnesses, which include chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Environmental Illness Society of Canada for all the work it does in this area. The society works across the country to raise awareness of these illnesses.

In November the first ever national symposium on environmental illnesses will be held in Hull, Quebec. Thanks in part to the work of the society it is sure to be a successful and extremely informative event.

The time is right for the government to assure sufferers of environmental illnesses that they will soon receive the support and recognition they need and deserve.

I would like all members of the House to support my private member's bill, Bill C-416, which addresses this very issue.

International Youth Week
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Ian Murray Lanark—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, as this is the last day of International Youth Week, it is my pleasure to address the House on the many ways the government is helping young Canadians to obtain new skills and training to help them compete in the global economy and broaden their exposure to foreign cultures.

Through the youth employment strategy, six federal departments are investing nearly $35 million to help over 2,500 youth each year get this valuable experience. In today's global economy it is vital to end the “no experience, no job/no job, no experience” cycle.

These international youth internships and exchange programs are part of our answer to helping young people take control of their lives and to make wise career choices in the global economy.

These programs are getting results. To quote a recent participant in HRDC's internship program “This internship changed me from a graduate intern with no experience to an export market representative for a manufacturing firm at the cutting edge of technology”.

I encourage every young person who is interested in participating in such a program to contact their local Human Resources Canada centre or to look up HRDC's youth page on the web.

I have every confidence they will benefit from these youth projects and will learn valuable lessons that will last a lifetime.

Holland
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Reform

Peter Goldring Edmonton East, AB

Mr. Speaker, 55 years ago freedom arrived in the heart of Holland; freedom bringing hope for a future built upon the sacrifices of the day; freedom brought at a very high price.

Row upon row of Canada's youth rest on Dutch soil, testament to a supreme effort in bringing an end to Holland's war torment. The Dutch remember this true price of peace.

This week the people of Holland opened their homes and hearts and welcomed thousands of Canada's veterans. They honoured them on parade and remembered the dead. Three hundred thousand cheered Canada's war soldiers as they proudly marched under royal review.

The Dutch touched all with their sincerity and respectful thoughts for Canada's honourable war veterans and remembered war dead. Holland paused and gave its respect. I thank Holland and and Canada's war veterans.

Thomas Lobsinger And Hoby Spruyt
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

NDP

Louise Hardy Yukon, YT

Mr. Speaker, I would like to pay tribute to Bishop Thomas Lobsinger and Brother Hoby Spruyt who died in a plane crash while on route to Dawson City, Yukon.

My first recollections of the bishop and the brother were as a young mother with four children in Catholic school. They were at all the assemblies and all the council meetings. The bishop of the Yukon was always smiling, but I think it was his kindness that was so moving and always, always felt.

We shared a neighbourhood and, as good fortune would have it, we often crossed paths. Either of us would stop mowing our grass at a moment's notice in order to talk, always about justice as he was a powerful advocate for the poor no matter where they lived.

His humour and gentle nature inspired all who came within his sphere. For both men, their compassion extended far beyond themselves, their diocese, and their country. Bishop Tom and Brother Hoby dedicated their lives to the service of humanity. They are buried now but their spirits will never be buried.

Human Resources Development
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Reform

Diane Ablonczy Calgary—Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, what is so disturbing about the Modes Conili scandal is that the minister turned a blind eye to obvious wrongdoing. His own employees alerted him to the fact that workers were simply transferred from company A to company B, but after a so-called investigation he rejected the only obvious conclusion that no jobs had been created.

The government is covering up the investigation report. Why would that be?

Human Resources Development
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member is wrong again. The government is not covering up any report. The government undertook a report in 1977. I seem to recall being told that it did not show anything to act upon at that time.

However, as the parliamentary secretary said in the House, new information was received on Tuesday. It was reviewed on Wednesday, and promptly the government itself referred the information to the RCMP. That shows our intention and our commitment to having things done properly.

Human Resources Development
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Reform

Diane Ablonczy Calgary—Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, if the government is not covering up the report, why do members of the House not have it? We have asked for it. Why was it not tabled? It is being covered up and the Deputy Prime Minister knows that full well.

The minister must have hired Inspector Clouseau for that investigation because it only took a reporter two phone calls to have enough evidence to spark a police investigation. The minister was obviously too negligent or incompetent to check out the same officials that a reporter did. Or, did he have his own reasons for not investigating properly? Did the need to show job creation and get a fat campaign donation override the—

Human Resources Development
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The Deputy Prime Minister.

Human Resources Development
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, from the insinuations and innuendos in the question it is obvious that Inspector Clouseau wrote that question and is the chief of the Reform research bureau. They ought to get someone better to prepare the questions, if not to ask them.