House of Commons Hansard #30 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was nations.

Topics

Member for Chicoutimi—Le Fjord
Statements By Members

December 4th, 2007 / 2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Denis Lebel Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean, QC

Mr. Speaker, the member for Chicoutimi—Le Fjord, a member of the perpetual opposition party, the Bloc Québécois, will celebrate the second anniversary of his re-election to Parliament on January 23. For several years now, he has been trying to move into the limelight, knowing that he has no hope of influencing decisions made here.

His inaction and inability to make progress on issues affecting our region have given our Prime Minister and our government the opportunity to rethink policies that will enable our region's economy to recover and adapt to international market conditions and strong competition from developing nations.

I would like to remind my colleague and his fellow Bloc Québécois members that my party is all about taking action. We promised to work hard to meet the needs of Canadians. We will do exactly that, because our government has always delivered the goods.

Tribute to Volunteers
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Independent

Louise Thibault Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, two million people in Quebec enrich our society by spending 300 million hours volunteering for aid agencies. I want to thank all these people who selflessly commit to a cause and improve the lives of countless others.

What sets these people apart is that they give of their time and energy without expecting anything in return. The only thing they get out of volunteering is the feeling of being uplifted as human beings.

Every time a volunteer serves a bowl of soup to a homeless person, listens to a victim of abuse or helps someone else, people come together a little more. Every time a volunteer makes a difference in someone's life, humankind as a whole benefits.

I salute the volunteers in my riding, in Quebec and across Canada. I pay tribute to them because they often make the difference between despair and hope.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, yesterday we learned that the government was hiding a foreign affairs report on the seriousness of climate change.

Today we learn that the government is hiding another report, this time from Natural Resources Canada. Here is another report about the disastrous impact of climate change on Canada and the world. Even the authors of the report want to know why it has not been released.

Why is the Prime Minister hiding this information from the Canadian people?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, no such thing is true. The government is not hiding any particular reports. The government is more than aware of the problem of climate change and the government has laid out in the throne speech the very precise actions and positions it is going to take to combat climate change, both here and internationally.

I do not know why the Leader of the Opposition complains about that position because, quite frankly, he let it pass here in the House of Commons.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, as I was not given an answer, I will ask the question again.

Yesterday, we learned that the government hid a foreign affairs report on the seriousness of climate change. Today, we learned that another report, this time from Natural Resources Canada, was also hidden by the government.

Why is the Prime Minister hiding this information? Is it because of his aversion to transparency, his aversion to the fight against climate change, or both?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the Leader of the Opposition's claims are unfounded. There is no conspiracy here. The government position on climate change was clearly stated in the throne speech and the leader of the Liberal Party voted for the throne speech.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the government is hiding reports on the seriousness of climate change. The government is sticking to a so-called climate change plan that is so weak that it is rejected in Canada and abroad. The government is telling the world that it will do nothing unless everyone does something. This is a recipe for disaster.

Will the Prime Minister finally admit that he does not believe in the science of climate change and he wants Bali to fail?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the government has been very clear. We are the first government establishing mandatory emission reduction targets for Canadian industry. We are also taking a clear position that we need an effective international protocol in which all polluters participate.

Once again, the Leader of the Opposition knew this. The government spelled this out for him in the Speech from the Throne. He voted for it here. He should not go around the world and complain about it abroad.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Etobicoke—Lakeshore, ON

Mr. Speaker, while the Commonwealth was seeking consensus on climate change, our Prime Minister was setting up roadblocks. While the Australian prime minister was ratifying Kyoto, our Prime Minister kept saying Kyoto was a mistake. While the British prime minister called for “common but differentiated responsibilities” on climate change, our Prime Minister refuses to sign anything unless everyone does.

Why has the Prime Minister set the course for failure at Bali?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I think if the deputy leader of the Liberal Party looks at the declaration from the Commonwealth, it speaks of the necessity of all countries doing something and also speaks of differentiated responsibilities. So, if he actually reads the declaration, he will see that it is exactly the consensus document that was reached by all countries of the Commonwealth.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Etobicoke—Lakeshore, ON

Mr. Speaker, given that Australia has ratified the Kyoto protocol, given that the British are demanding absolute and major reductions, given that the international community is launching an attack against climate change in Bali, why does the Prime Minister refuse to even promote his own domestic targets on the international scene?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the deputy leader of the Liberal Party is wrong, wrong and wrong. He never lets the facts get in the way.

If he wants to use quotes, I can use quotes too. He talked about the Australian prime minister. Let us listen to what Kevin Rudd, the Australian prime minister, said. He said, “our position is clear”. He went on to say:

...developing countries need to adopt commitments themselves. That is absolutely fundamental and those commitments would need to have an impact, not just on the major emitters, but also have an effect on their own greenhouse gas emissions.

We stand with the new prime minister of Australia and we look forward to working with him to get the job done.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday Jean Charest said that the federal government must take a leadership role on the issue of climate change. The Prime Minister is doing exactly the opposite. When he was in opposition, he did everything he could to stop Canada from signing the Kyoto protocol. Now that he is in power, it seems he truly wants to stop the fight against climate change.

Will the Prime Minister admit that his “all or nothing” policy has just one objective: to ensure the failure of post-Kyoto and please western oil companies?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, on the contrary, this is the first government in Canada that has established mandatory targets for industry in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Again, this is the only government that has adopted targets. There are no targets for the provincial governments in this country.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister does not want to agree to any plan on climate change unless China and India are on board. These two countries produce far fewer greenhouse gas emissions per capita than Canada does.

Is the Prime Minister prepared to support a greenhouse gas emissions reduction plan on the polluter pay principle, taking into account emissions per capita, with absolute targets and 1990 as the base year? This is an opportunity for the Prime Minister to show leadership.