House of Commons Hansard #102 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was change.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I have to say that the only mockery in this House is that engendered by my hon. colleague's friends, the members of the previous government.

Our colleague, the Minister of the Environment, recognizes and accepts the efforts that have been made. That is why he is in Paris today. He is meeting with people and he will read the report. These things have to be done and I invite our colleagues to work together with us to decrease greenhouse gases.

Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Karen Redman Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, in 1997 the Liberal government created the position of environment commissioner to provide sound, independent advice to Parliament about protecting Canada's environment and working toward sustainable development, but after this past week it appears that the environment commissioner is not as independent as Parliament had originally thought she would be.

Will the Prime Minister support a motion to establish an independent environment commissioner as an officer of Parliament?

Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, we will look at all options, but in mentioning the environment commissioner, let us listen to what the commissioner said in the 2001 report: “The continued upward trend in Canada's emissions demonstrates that the government”, which refers to the Liberal government, “has not transformed its promises into results”.

The Liberals could not get it done. In 2002 the federal government's sustainable development deficit was growing. They could not get it done in 2003. There is a gap between what that government said it would do and what it was actually doing. Good intentions are not enough. The Liberals did not get it done.

Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Karen Redman Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I fear my hon. colleague has missed the point of my question. I will repeat it.

Rumours that the dismissal of the environment commissioner is related to a report that she presented last September will simply not go away. We on this side of the House have always believed in the importance of having a true, non-partisan defender of the environment who reports to Parliament.

Would the Prime Minister ensure that the next environment commissioner has the ability to advocate on behalf of the environment? Will he also agree that only Parliament should be able to dismiss the commissioner from her position?

Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, we do appreciate the hard work of the commissioner and the Auditor General. In 2004, the commissioner went on to say in her report:

Why is progress so slow? After all, the mandates and commitments are there, the knowledge of what to do and how to do it is there, and we know it can be done--some of our findings show that. I am left to conclude that the reasons are lack of leadership, lack of priority, and lack of will.

The Liberals did not get it done.

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, during the election campaign, the Prime Minister kept saying that he needed ministers to represent Quebec. However, what he forgot to tell Quebeckers—and the Boeing contract is a blatant example— is that he needed Quebec ministers to work against Quebec. New government, but same old Canadian formula for putting Quebec in its place.

Will the Minister of Transport and the political lieutenant for Quebec admit that by refusing to demand that Quebec be given its fair share, or about 60% of the contract spinoffs, the Quebec ministers, with an eye to their jobs, chose to put Canada ahead of Quebec's interests?

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we will make no such admissions since they are not true.

The facts are as follows. Colleagues on this side of the House, whether they are members or ministers, continue to serve the interests of Quebec.

With regard to this matter, we are confident that in Canada, and especially in Quebec, the aerospace industry will earn its stripes, but that will depend on the maturity of this industry and its ability to do the job.

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, Quebec was entitled to receive its due, that is the lion's share of the spinoffs. However to advance their careers, at least in the short term, the Conservative ministers from Quebec chose to abdicate their responsibilities to Quebeckers. The image is striking: in Trenton, Ontario, two Quebeckers will sign the contract and make official the surrender of the Quebec Conservatives.

Is the Minister of Transport and the political lieutenant for Quebec not ashamed to be part of such a regrettable spectacle, one that Quebeckers will surely remember in the next election?

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I am always flabbergasted by this kind of talk. To try to do something about the mystery of Quebec City, their solution was to parachute someone from Montreal into that riding.

With regard to the question, it is a little bit ridiculous to have the Bloc Québécois dictate economic development strategies for Canada. Its separation project is the most serious threat to the Canadian economy.

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Claude Bachand Saint-Jean, QC

Mr. Speaker, in Trenton, Ontario—which must now be Canada's new aerospace capital—the government is about to confirm that it is abandoning the Quebec aerospace industry with the blessing of Conservative ministers and members from Quebec.

How can Conservative ministers from Quebec be yes-men to such a betrayal? It is obvious that they are nothing but a bunch of doormats.

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Colin Carrie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, this government is committed to ensuring positive economic spinoffs, dollar for dollar, from our military investments, at the same time strengthening Canada's industrial base.

This is exactly what we are doing. Under the IRB policy, it is the responsibility of the Minister of Industry to ensure that investments made here in Canada are of the highest quality. We will continue to work for that for our industries.

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Claude Bachand Saint-Jean, QC

Mr. Speaker, how interesting that a member from Ontario leaps to the defence of the Quebec doormats when people start asking questions.

A year after they were elected, the Conservative members from Quebec have turned into the sycophantic servants of the federal powers that be.

How will they explain to their voters that they sold Quebec out to satisfy Canada? They will have to tell their voters that they have sunk about as low as cowards can.

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois has been sounding like a broken record ever since it first came here. They accuse us of being traitors and doormats for the industry, yet the only people getting in Quebec's way and interfering with its progress are the members of the Bloc Québécois. Once again, I must say that if, at the very least, they participated actively in developing their communities, that would mean something. But that is not what they do. Every time a Quebec company has a chance to demonstrate its ability to participate in the world market, the Bloc steps in to quell their ambitions. Doormats indeed.

The Environment
Oral Questions

February 2nd, 2007 / 11:25 a.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, the experts have submitted their report to the Paris conference, which is currently underway. They predict that we will see an increase in heat waves and heavy precipitation. We will also see more tsunamis and cyclones. The crisis is both real and immediate, that much is clear.

When will the government take action, beginning, for example, with cancelling the massive subsidies to the big oil and gas companies?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, my colleague, the Minister of the Environment, is in Paris today. Of course, we all recognize that climate change exists. We have often said this and my colleague reiterated that fact.

There is no denying the determination shown by the scientific community and I must assure my hon. colleague that action is being taken. In fact, just a few weeks ago, we announced nearly $2 billion in investments, specifically targeted at precise and concrete action.