House of Commons Hansard #102 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was identification.

Topics

Income Trusts
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Calgary—Nose Hill
Alberta

Conservative

Diane Ablonczy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the finance critic for the Liberals knows very well that the Governor of the Bank of Canada is an independent officer.

He also knows that not only is the Governor of the Bank of Canada highly respected here in Canada but internationally as well. I expect that is why the Liberals appointed the Governor of the Bank of Canada and why the finance critic, who was a member of the cabinet, endorsed that appointment.

However, I can understand why the Liberals would be rather embarrassed, because the Governor of the Bank of Canada said that levelling the playing field for business was long overdue.

Instead of looking at the mirror, I guess some people just try to shoot the messenger.

Justice
Oral Questions

February 2nd, 2007 / 11:45 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Pickton trial has focused enormous attention on the tragedy of the missing women from Vancouver's downtown eastside. It raises deeply disturbing questions about why Canada's justice system failed and why it failed sex workers.

The recent parliamentary report shows the harmful effects of the law and yet the Prime Minister has dismissed it.

I am not asking the Minister of Justice to comment on the trial, but I am asking him to be clear about what the government will do to protect the health, safety and human rights of sex workers.

Justice
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Conservative

Rob Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the government is certainly sympathetic to everything that is taking place in that regard. We will of course take the time to review the report of the subcommittee on solicitation laws and its recommendations and we will respond in due course.

However, there can be no doubt that prostitution victimizes the vulnerable, typically women, and it forces those who have few choices into a world with even fewer choices.

Justice
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have to say that vague assertions and sympathy will not change the reality.

I took Sereena Abotsway to vote. She died at age 32, never able to vote again because this House failed her, failed to change laws that could have protected her. I never want to wake up again to the news of a murdered street worker.

The federal government must come to terms with the contradictions of its position and recognize that law reform is urgently needed.

How much longer will the government ignore these women?

Justice
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Conservative

Rob Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, we are listening to all stakeholders. There are many aspects to the problem of prostitution and ensuring the protection of those who work in the sex trade is a priority. However, the government does not feel that decriminalization is one of those appropriate responses.

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Maria Minna Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the minister stated that her office had contacted women's groups in Vancouver with three proposed meeting dates.

I will quote an e-mail sent to me yesterday from women's organizations. It reads:

What the Minister said in the House [Thursday] was incorrect. We had not been contacted by her office at the time her statement was made. We had not been offered dates on which we said we were unable to meet.

Contrary to the minister's accusation against me, will she apologize to this House for providing false information?

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, my office had offered a date and, in fact, we were told the organization representatives could not be in attendance because they were going to be in New York City at that time.

We have now gone back and we are waiting for their reply on the new suggested dates.

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Maria Minna Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, the minister continues to do the same. I have evidence in the emails here. It is clear that the minister was the one deceiving and intentionally misleading the House yesterday, not me.

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Order, please. The hon. member cannot suggest that members are deliberately misleading the House. There is a procedure for doing that and we will not have it during question period. The hon. member will put her question forthwith.

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Maria Minna Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, those were the minister's words against me yesterday and if they were valid yesterday, they are valid today. I am sorry but they are according to Hansard.

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

We are not getting into an argument on it. The minister certainly did not say the member deliberately misled. If she had, she would have been ruled out of order.

We will move on to the next questioner. The hon. member for Hull—Aylmer.

Hog Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Quebec has delegated three ministers to try to resolve the crisis shaking the hog industry as the closure of the Olymel plant in Vallée-Jonction draws near.

The provincial ministers of economic development, labour and agriculture are in talks with Olymel and the CSN, which represents the unionized employees, in order to break the impasse. In the meantime, the Conservative government is twiddling its thumbs and not doing anything.

Why is the government not taking some action?

Hog Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Secretary of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, it is true that the current situation at Olymel is serious. However, we have repeatedly said that they can count on our support. The federal government will intervene in due time, when asked to do so. Currently, working groups are forming since this is a private matter. Producers may be indirectly affected, as well, and our programs will respond to that.

It is incorrect to say we are twiddling our thumbs. It is time to stop playing petty politics at the expense of the Olymel workers.

Hog Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, when the mad cow crisis shook the cattle industry, the Liberal government did not hesitate to allocate nearly $1 billion to support the producers.

Today, we have a minister whose riding is at the epicentre of the hog industry crisis and he is acting as though this were a trivial matter, sticking to his laissez-faire capitalist ideology.

Does the minister not realize that his abstract theories do not put a whole lot of bacon on the kitchen tables in Beauce?