House of Commons Hansard #127 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was employment.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

Noon

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, on four separate occasions in the House and at committee, the Minister of the Environment ruled out Canada's participation in international carbon markets.

Then the minister, on one of his international trips in search of his missing made in Canada plan, announced in Germany that he was considering reversing his position. Then yesterday the Prime Minister completely ruled out Canada's participation, only to be contradicted a half hour later by the Minister of the Environment in committee when he stated that Canada would participate.

Is the minister misleading the international community or is he misleading Canadians?

The Environment
Oral Questions

Noon

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the question is from the member who filibustered yesterday and shut down the environment committee.

The minister has been very clear all along that we will consider all options, but we will not send billions of dollars of taxpayer money out of Canada to buy hot air emission credits, as that member supports. We think it is better to spend those dollars in Canada to build new technologies, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to clean up the environmental mess left by the Liberals.

Modernization of Investigative Techniques Act
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-416, An Act regulating telecommunications facilities to facilitate the lawful interception of information transmitted by means of those facilities and respecting the provision of telecommunications subscriber information.

Mr. Speaker, it is quite an honour for me to table this bill, an act regulating telecommunications facilities to facilitate the lawful interception of information transmitted by means of those facilities and respecting the provision of telecommunications subscriber information.

The bill, called modernization of investigative techniques act, or MITA, is intended to ensure that telecommunication service providers build and maintain an interception capability on their networks that allows for the lawful interception of communications by our law enforcement agencies, like the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, but also our national police force, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, our provincial and municipal police.

Similar legislation is already in place in many countries, including the United States, the United Kingdom—

International Day for Commemoration
Routine Proceedings

March 23rd, 2007 / 12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval—Les Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, this coming Sunday is a significant date in history. I therefore ask you to seek unanimous consent in the House for the following motion. I move:

That the House recognize the importance of March 25, 2007, as the International Day for the Commemoration of the 200th Anniversary of the Act to Abolish the African Slave Trade in the British Empire.

International Day for Commemoration
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Is that agreed?.

International Day for Commemoration
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

International Day for Commemoration
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

(Motion agreed to)

Justice
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Conservative

James Lunney Nanaimo—Alberni, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have here a large petition of some 18,000 signatures largely collected by the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition.

The petitioners draw attention to the fact that section 241 of the Criminal Code of Canada states that everyone who counsels a person to commit a suicide or abets a person to commit a suicide, whether suicide ensues or not, is guilty of an indictable offence. The petitioners remind Parliament that the Supreme Court upheld section 241 in the Rodriguez decision, finding no charter right to suicide.

They call upon Parliament to retain section 241 of the Criminal Code, without changes, in order that Parliament not sanction or allow the counselling, aiding or abetting a suicide whether by personal action or by the Internet.

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, I ask that all questions be allowed to stand.

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Is that agreed?

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Bill C-265—Employment Insurance Act—Speaker's Ruling
Points of Order
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

On February 7, prior to the second reading debate on Bill C-265, An Act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (qualification for and entitlement to benefits) standing in the name of the hon. member for Acadie—Bathurst, a point of order was raised by the Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform to the effect that this bill would result in significant new expenditures by lowering the threshold for eligibility for some claimants and changing the formula for the calculation of benefits. The parliamentary secretary supported this interpretation by referring to three rulings where the Chair concluded that similar bills, which extended employment insurance benefits, required a royal recommendation.

Interventions on this matter were also made by the hon. members for Mississauga South and for Acadie—Bathurst. The Chair wishes to thank all hon. members for their comments on this issue.

In replying to the parliamentary secretary’s point of order, the member for Acadie—Bathurst expressed the opinion that a royal recommendation was not required since any new expenditure would be covered by contributions from workers and employers and not by the government.

I have examined the bill carefully and find that the changes to the employment insurance program envisioned by this bill include lowering the threshold for becoming a major attachment claimant to 360 hours, setting benefits payable to 55% of the average weekly insurable earnings during the highest paid 12 weeks of the 12 month period preceding the interruption of earnings, and removing the distinctions made to the qualifying period on the basis of the regional unemployment rate.

It is abundantly clear to the Chair that such changes to the employment insurance program, notwithstanding the fact that workers and employers contribute to it, would have the effect of authorizing increased expenditures from the consolidated revenue fund in a manner and for purposes not currently authorized.

Therefore, it appears to the Chair that those provisions of the bill which relate to increasing employment insurance benefits and easing the qualifications required to obtain them would require a royal recommendation.

In its present form I will decline to put the question on third reading of this bill unless a royal recommendation is received. Today, however, the debate is on the motion for second reading and this motion shall be put to a vote at the close of the second reading debate.

The House resumed consideration of the motion that Bill C-35, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (reverse onus in bail hearings for firearm-related offences), be read the second time and referred to a committee.

Criminal Code
Government Orders

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Before question period the hon. member for Surrey North had the floor for questions and comments consequent on her speech. I therefore call upon the member for Yukon for questions or comments.

Criminal Code
Government Orders

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

Larry Bagnell Yukon, YT

Mr. Speaker, I would like the member to comment on the presumption of innocence in relation to this bill.