House of Commons Hansard #167 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Atlantic Canada
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Mr. Speaker, the member should quit while he is behind.

As the words are falling from his mouth, he knows they are not true. As the words are falling from his mouth trying to defend the terrible record of the government he was a part of for so many years in comparison to the transparent, straightforward, getting the job done government of the Conservative Party, he should be ashamed.

The member should go back to Cape Breton and back to egg farming where he knows he might be able to crack a few eggs.

Agriculture
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Harold Albrecht Kitchener—Conestoga, ON

Mr. Speaker, for years Canadian farmers have had a difficult time competing against unfair U.S. subsidies.

As a result of years of Liberal inaction, our corn producers in particular have been hit hard. I know the corn producers in my riding of Kitchener--Conestoga have been battling hard to scratch out a living and to raise their families.

Would the Secretary of State for Agriculture tell this House what our government is doing to stand up for producers against the U.S. and its unfair subsidies?

Agriculture
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Secretary of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, these subsidies continue to pose economic harm to our producers, especially our corn growers. This is unacceptable and we encourage action.

That is why I am pleased to announce that our government will be requesting a WTO dispute settlement panel be established on the issue of U.S. agricultural subsidies. Canadian farmers deserve a level playing field.

While the opposition talks about supporting Canadian producers, this Conservative government is getting the job done.

Africa
Oral Questions

June 8th, 2007 / 11:45 a.m.

NDP

Alexa McDonough Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, our Prime Minister wants to wear the mantle of mediator. He imagines himself to be a bridge.

After this week's sorry display of weak leadership and rehashed promises at the G-8 summit, Canadians know that Canada's place in the world is more diminished than ever.

We stand with the nations that water down their international promises. Two years ago the world promised $50 billion to Africa. We are $30 billion short. Now the richest nations are saying that they will up it to $60 billion, but we are not to ask for details or deadlines.

When will the government announce details and deadlines for aid to Africa?

Africa
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Mr. Speaker, as we have seen on so many important files when it comes to international aid, the budget is going up for Africa. In fact, the aid for Africa reached $1.7 billion last year. The numbers are going up. The base line budget has increased again this year.

Canada is well on track to meet its Gleneagles commitments. Canada will double its international assistance to 2010 and will in fact double its international assistance to Africa by 2009.

Africa
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Alexa McDonough Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, millions of people will go without food today and 16,000 people infected with HIV, malaria and TB will die today while the leaders of the richest nations bid farewell at elegant cocktail parties and slap each other on the back for a self-proclaimed job well done.

Promises made four years ago have not been kept. G-8 promises from two years ago in Scotland have not been kept. We are $30 billion short of the goal, with no way whatsoever to determine which nations owe what and when. Why did Canada not insist on real goals with real results for Africa?

Africa
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Mr. Speaker, with the greatest respect, I am sure that the hon. member had breakfast this morning. I am sure that the hon. member herself has been to a few of those cocktail parties that she tries to show such disdain for.

In fact, with respect to Africa, this government has made significant commitments that increased the funding, with $450 million to support efforts to strengthen health care systems and $250 million to the global fund to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, $150 million of which will be specifically focused on Africa.

The Prime Minister also announced support for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. There was World AIDS Day money announced by the Minister of International Cooperation, with $120 million for 20 projects in Africa. These initiatives--

Africa
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

The Deputy Speaker Bill Blaikie

The hon. member for Mississauga East—Cooksville.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Albina Guarnieri Mississauga East—Cooksville, ON

Mr. Speaker, in December 2005 the Prime Minister gave his word to 150,000 veterans that they would receive immediate and full compensation for potential exposure to defoliants at Gagetown.

The Minister of Veterans Affairs promised to deliver a compensation package by fall 2006. In January he said it was weeks away, then it was the spring, and then this week he voted for a budget that did not identify a single dime for agent orange compensation.

I ask simply why he cannot keep a deadline and why can he not keep a promise and keep the Prime Minister's word to Canada's veterans?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, our government is committed to resolving the agent orange problem. The issue is in the cabinet process at this time. At an appropriate time, an announcement will be made.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Albina Guarnieri Mississauga East—Cooksville, ON

Mr. Speaker, we might as well be waiting for Godot. We have heard that promise before.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Peter Van Loan York—Simcoe, ON

That's when you were in government, I believe.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Albina Guarnieri Mississauga East—Cooksville, ON

The minister might think that he is the Artful Dodger, but the government is sounding more like Fagan.

The minister was fond of saying when in opposition that studies are just a way for the government to get to the next election without offering compensation. Now that the election is delayed, he says that these fact-finding missions are important.

I ask the minister directly, does he have no plan at all? Is he stalling until the next election or was his plan rejected by the Prime Minister?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, as I said before, we are committed to resolving the agent orange problem. This issue will be resolved as soon as possible.

Transportation
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, in Quebec, the granite and monuments industry is the lifeblood of entire towns such as Stanstead and Saint-Sébastien. The skills of Quebec sculptors, cutters and polishers are a tremendous asset in dealing with increasingly fierce competition from Asia. However, Transport Canada is forcing them to face this competition with their hands tied behind their backs.

Why is Transport Canada ordering blocks of stone, imported and washed according to the rules, to be turned back when they arrive at the port of Montreal, thereby denying the industry its raw material?