House of Commons Hansard #167 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Official Languages
Statements By Members

June 8th, 2007 / 11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval—Les Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the action plan for official languages, which was created by the Liberal government, will expire in 2008. Francophone groups across Canada and anglophones in Quebec have repeatedly told us how crucial this program has been to the development of their communities. They are concerned about the plan's survival and wondering whether the Conservative government plans to extend it. The Prime Minister recently stated: “The new government is committed to supporting bilingualism and linguistic minorities across the country”. Is this another empty promise?

As the Commissioner of Official Languages said: “The government’s message has been very positive. Unfortunately, the actions this government has taken in the past year do not reflect this message”.

The Leader of the Opposition promises francophone and Acadian communities that he will implement an even stronger action plan than the one he put in place in 2003, when he was Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs.

Douglas Jung
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Jim Abbott Kootenay—Columbia, BC

Mr. Speaker, 50 years ago on June 10, 1957, Canada's first Asian Canadian was elected to Parliament. As a Conservative, Douglas Jung was nicknamed the “Giant Killer” when he took out the Liberal minister of defence in that election. It was just one milestone in his notable career in Canadian public life.

Born in Victoria in 1924, the two term MP was the first Chinese Canadian to argue a case before the B.C. Court of Appeal and serve Canada at the United Nations. Despite not being recognized as an official citizen of Canada, Douglas Jung enlisted in the Canadian Forces in World War II.

The patriotism that he and his fellow Chinese veterans displayed ultimately paved the way for the repeal of the Chinese exclusion act, and to full citizenship rights for Chinese Canadians. Chinese Canadians continue to be leaders in many fields of Canadian life.

I call on members of the House to join me in celebrating the achievements of Mr. Jung in this place five decades ago.

Crime Prevention
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to expose the Conservative crime plan as an attempt to import a failed American style justice system into Canada. What has not worked in the U.S. is not going to work in Canada either.

The reality is that the Conservative scheme is simplistic and costly because the government refuses to use the most effective crime prevention tools. Using those tools means fewer victims.

When the Conservatives say “tough on crime”, they mean funneling taxpayer dollars solely into incarceration, not prevention. The truth is that for every dollar invested in crime prevention, six dollars are saved in policing and incarceration costs and there are far fewer victims.

Instead of just being tough on crime, we need to be smart on crime. The NDP wants to see tough penalties for violent offenders, but even more important, we want to invest to ensure that crimes are never committed in the first place.

We need to cut crime at the roots. The solutions are to fight poverty and addiction, invest in education, support our youth, build stronger communities and strengthen our police forces. That is being smart on crime.

Child Care
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Anita Neville Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, the status of women committee has recently completed a study on the economic security of women. Women from across the country repeatedly spoke about the need for quality child care so that they could go to school or go to work and know that their children were safe and cared for.

In Winnipeg South Centre there are more children on wait lists than enrolled in child care centres. Eighty per cent of the centres have lengthy wait lists.

The Conservatives' 2006 platform said that the Conservatives believe in freedom of choice in child care. Where is the choice?

In 2005 the Liberal government offered a national plan and signed the first early learning and child care agreement with Manitoba worth $176 million over five years. Now they get $9 million. Instead, the government shamelessly cancelled the agreement.

Wait lists and a small taxable allowance are not choice in child care. Families in Canada deserve better from the government.

Philippe Aumont
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Richard Nadeau Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, the city of Gatineau is home to an 18-year-old pitcher, a major league baseball prospect. His dream has come true. Yesterday, Philippe Aumont was selected by the Seattle Mariners.

According to experts, Philippe Aumont was very likely to be chosen in the first round. He was in fact the seventh pitcher chosen. Only two other Canadians have been selected higher than Philippe: Adam Loewen by Baltimore and Jeff Francis by Colorado.

Thank you to his family and to the Gatineau amateur baseball association for the support they have given Philippe.

The Bloc Québécois joins me in saying to Philippe Aumont that we are proud of his rise to the major leagues. We wish him the best in his career. Philippe is a role model for young Quebeckers who also play their favourite sport.

Sidewalk Art
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, it was with great pleasure that I took part, on June 1, in the 12th annual Fleurs de macadam happening.

This is a great community event that stimulates imagination, creativity and joie de vivre in thousands of children and adults.

More than 3,500 children from nursery, primary and secondary schools in the area gathered together in Aylmer. Everywhere I went, coloured chalk drawings transformed the grey sidewalks into a giant outdoor art gallery.

The Optimist Club of Aylmer served lunch to over 3,000 students, parents and teachers who took part in this unique cultural activity.

I would like to congratulate the president of the Optimist Club of Aylmer, Marcel Rainville, and his entire team for their dedication and excellent work. Tomorrow the club is celebrating its 35th anniversary of serving youth in the Aylmer community.

Congratulations and long life to the Optimist Club of Aylmer.

Senate Tenure Legislation
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Barry Devolin Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian public still awaits a public display of leadership by the Liberal leader regarding term limits for senators.

In May 2006 he expressed his support for term limits by saying that the best way to deal with Senate reform would be to “require Senators to agree to sign an agreement promising to step down after six years”. Later that same month he said, “senators should be placed on fixed terms of six to 10 years”.

In December he said, “I'm not against the idea to have a mandate for senators between eight and 12 years”. In February he declared that the Liberal Party supported term limits and said “a term limit is a good idea if it's not too short”.

Quite simply, the Senate must change and everyone knows it, including the Liberal leader. When will he put an end to privileged Liberal entitlements and tell his senators to pass the bill to limit the terms of senators and finally, for once, show some real leadership on this important issue?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Bush administration says it feels vindicated today after G-8 countries chose to endorse its go slow approach to climate change: no firm targets; no clear limits; no real action.

It did not have to be this way. The Prime Minister could have rallied his G-8 partners around the German chancellor's original goals. He could have held up Parliament's clean air and climate change act to the world as a model for real action on the environment. Instead, he helped to build a bridge to nowhere. Why did this Prime Minister fail the world?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, on the contrary. The G-8 meeting was, I think, a great victory for Canada, where the G-8 declaration actually holds out Canada as a model to the world of where to go on climate change. That was something endorsed by all the G-8 leaders.

I read in the media today that there are positive reports. The Montreal Gazette states:

[The Prime Minister] looked quite sure-footed this week...[the summit declaration] has Canada's fingerprints all over it. [For the Prime Minister] it's a leadership moment, one in which he has reclaimed Canada's modest but sensible role as honest broker in the single most important club in the world.

It is a great success for Canada. We are showing leadership again for a change.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

Some model, Mr. Speaker. A model toy train, perhaps, but nothing serious for the planet.

This Prime Minister failed the G-8 summit leadership test. He refused to adopt absolute emissions reduction targets, deciding that he would rather promote a resolution that will do nothing more than “seriously consider”—maybe, someday—a world greenhouse gas reduction target.

Seriously, what is there to be considered?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, thanks to our government's plan, we now have the credibility we need to play a leadership role on a global scale.

I would like to quote Jean Lapierre, who was a minister in the previous Liberal government. This morning, he said that this is not a failure, it is a success because it is realistic, a success because the European Union recognizes the role of the United Nations in the fight against climate change, a success because we can finally create a true global plan.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister even refused to support the simplest measures, such as improving energy efficiency by 20%.

All of the Prime Minister's photo ops and the Minister of the Environment's self-congratulatory attitude cannot hide the fact that the Prime Minister let down both Canada and the world at the G-8 summit: no targets, no limits, no action. Canada should have been a leader at the summit.

Why did the Prime Minister choose to promote the George Bush-Republican Party plan?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, according to the statement released by the G-8 leaders, Canada is a leader in environmental issues.

We are cited as a leader. Canada is seen as a model of what should be followed. We have been able to work toward the real step for long term climate change improvement: that of bringing in the big emitter countries like China, the United States and India.

That is why Angela Merkel, president of the G-8 for this meeting, declared it a big success. No one can escape this political declaration. It is an enormous step forward. We have very great progress and an excellent result.

I know the opposition does not want to believe the head of the G-8 and the head of the European Union. But guess what? We think that is a pretty good vote of--

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

NDP

The Deputy Speaker Bill Blaikie

The hon. member for Kitchener Centre.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Karen Redman Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the science is clear: allowing the Earth's temperature to rise more than 2° C will spell disaster. It will mean severe heat waves, floods, droughts and hurricanes. However, Canada fought to ditch any reference to these 2° which was a major goal of this G-8 meeting. Canada fought the science.

Why does the government reject science which tells us what must be done?