House of Commons Hansard #62 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was change.

Topics

Automotive Industry
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Brian Masse Windsor West, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise again today to call upon this House to institute a national auto policy. The Conservative government, supported by the Liberals, continues to move the auto industry in the wrong direction and cost Canadian jobs.

The 2008 budget in particular adds taxes to the auto industry and eliminates funding for new technology and programs that could actually create green sustainable jobs.

Why does the government continue to pursue trade policies where we cannot actually ship our auto products into other markets because of tariff and non-tariff barriers put on Canadians?

I call upon the Liberals to stand up and stop this disastrous auto policy. The Minister of International Trade, was a Liberal before he crossed the floor. He said the Conservatives would kill the auto industry. Well, he is right and he is doing it with his colleagues right now.

Status of Women
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Omar Alghabra Mississauga—Erindale, ON

Mr. Speaker, later this week women around the world will celebrate International Women's Day and its theme, “Strong Women, Strong World”.

We will remember Canadian trailblazers, Emily Murphy, Nellie McClung, Henrietta Muir Edwards, Louise McKinney and Irene Parlby, whose fierce determination overcame the prejudices of their time to pave the way for women to be recognized as persons in Canada.

This is also a time to remember that there is still more to do. Remember that Canadian women still only earn 71¢ for every dollar a man earns. Remember that the Conservative government cancelled the court challenges program. Remember that the Conservative government shut down the law commission. Remember that the Conservative government closed the doors of 12 out of 16 Status of Women regional offices.

On the eve of International Women's Day, we salute Canadian women and call on the government to stop making decisions that thwart their progress.

Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame Gala
Statements By Members

March 7th, 2008 / 11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Meili Faille Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday I denounced the CBC's attitude toward francophone artists. I will go one better today because the CBC decided to cut images of all francophone artists from the broadcast two months ago. In fact, that is why Martin Duchesne, a Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame board member and the Quebec bureau chief, stepped down.

He said that in previous years the francophone broadcasters were told to keep away from the anglophone broadcasters and keep their speeches short. The artists had to leave an empty chair between francophones and anglophones for the sole purpose of editing images out of the broadcast. This event was planned and structured to eliminate francophone artists from the televised gala.

What is even more appalling in this entire affair is that not a single member of Parliament from Quebec, except those from the Bloc Québécois, stood up in this House to denounce the CBC's shameful attitude toward francophones.

Status of Women
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Maria Minna Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, last week delegations from around the world were in New York to attend meetings of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women.

After two years in government, the only thing the Canadian delegation could tell the world was that it intends to develop a so-called action plan to advance women's equality in this country. There are no details, no timetable.

Two years ago the government's action plan led to the elimination of the court challenges program, the law commission, and 12 out of 16 Status of Women offices.

More than 17 Canadian organizations, representing thousands of women were at the UN. The reaction to the Canadian plan was swift, “all words, little action, no money for women”, all thanks to the Conservative government.

We agree that the Conservative government has turned back the clock on women's rights and slammed the door in their faces.

On the eve of International Women's Day, the Liberal Party applauds Canadian women, their achievements and the many organizations that advocate on their behalf, even if the Conservative government will not.

International Women's Week
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Sylvie Boucher Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, International Women's Week ends on March 8, which is International Women's Day.

Our government is working to support women's full participation in Canada's economic, social and democratic life, which will help achieve equality for all women.

Our government has taken real action to support women and their families. This week, we announced that five new women's shelters will be built. This will help fight violence against first nations women and families.

In addition, we have announced 14 more projects that will receive a total of $3.4 million in funding. For those of us on this side of the House, equality is not just a symbol; it is, first and foremost, our reason for being.

I would like to take this opportunity to personally salute all of the women in this House on this special day of ours.

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, the government is trying to scuttle its Cadman scandal. It is now even highlighting other Conservative scandals, and it is a long list, to take attention away from that taped conversation which captured the Prime Minister's very own words: “the offer to Chuck”, “there were financial issues”, “replace financial considerations”, “financial insecurity”, “make the case”. These have nothing to do with a party nomination.

When will the government realize this issue will not go away until the Prime Minister finally answers?

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the Liberals' enthusiasm for their Friday leader. That is good to see.

As I have said, the only considerations ever presented to Chuck Cadman were the considerations that we wanted to have him rejoin the Conservative caucus and present himself as a Conservative candidate.

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, the only thing piling up faster than snow in Ottawa is the number of Conservative scandals the Prime Minister will not investigate.

However, he is not the only Conservative to have a revealing conversation back in 2005 about Chuck Cadman. The now Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works had one too, also with a journalist. The parliamentary secretary explained the exact death benefit issue that was so crucial to Mr. Cadman. Again, that had nothing to do with any party nomination.

Can the government not see that stonewalling will not work, not this time?

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals are going to be fixated on this as a consequence of their not accepting the facts and not accepting Chuck Cadman's own words that the only offer made to Chuck Cadman was our desire to have him run for us in the campaign, and for him to be the Conservative candidate in that election. That is the central fact of this.

The Liberals are going to be continually spinning in the mud as they continue to ignore that fact.

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, the government's explanation is just not credible.

If those “financial considerations” mentioned by the Prime Minister on that tape back in 2005 were only to get Chuck Cadman to run as the Conservative candidate, if that was the only goal, then surely the party interest would be ongoing.

How many efforts were made to persuade Mr. Cadman to become a Conservative once again after the May 19 vote on the 2005 budget?

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, Chuck Cadman was always welcome to rejoin the Conservative caucus. As a matter of fact, after that vote there were a number of times when I saw Chuck Cadman around and I would tell him he was welcome back to our party any time. There were always efforts to have Chuck rejoin us. He was always welcome to come back.

The Liberals can continue their conspiracy theories, but the truth is they have already made up their minds on this issue. They have already decided that there has been a crime here without any evidence whatsoever. They have made the accusations outside of the House of Commons and they will be seen in court.

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister can try to evade the issue as much as he wants, but Canadians want some answers. On a tape recording, we clearly hear the Prime Minister say he authorized two legitimate representatives from his party to offer “financial considerations” to Chuck Cadman. The offer was to compensate Mr. Cadman for any losses he might incur if he changed his vote and an election was called.

Thus, the question is very clear: what losses are we talking about for which Mr. Cadman was offered compensation?

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, the only offer was the one I mentioned yesterday, and on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and last week. We wanted Chuck to run for the Conservative Party.

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, today is Friday. The Conservative government is pretending that it does not understand the seriousness of this scandal. We are talking about buying a member's vote. The government may not know this, but that is illegal. It is prohibited by the rules of the House of Commons. It is prohibited by the Criminal Code. It is prohibited by the Parliament of Canada Act. It is prohibited, period.

Does the Conservative government understand that it is the public's confidence in its elected officials that is at stake here, and that we are talking about a completely flagrant lack of respect for our democratic process?

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, I hope my colleague and friend does not hurt himself when asking his questions. He is pretty energized today.

I can understand if my colleague does not want to take my word for it. He does not have to. That is fair. That is common in our parliamentary procedure.

I would ask him to just take the word of Chuck Cadman himself when he was interviewed by Mike Duffy. Mike Duffy asked him, “--Conservatives were prepared to offer you an unopposed nomination if you would vote with them, and also help with campaign funding and so on. Was that offer actually made?” Chuck Cadman said, “Yes...that was the only offer on anything that I had from anybody”.