House of Commons Hansard #62 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was lenses.

Topics

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative agenda is clearly hurting women. Double the number of women live under the poverty line, the low income cut-off, as compared to men. Women are earning only 71% of the incomes that men earn, and that is only in their best earning years. It is worse in the rest of their earning years, leaving all kinds of women in this country behind.

We talk about aboriginal women and girls being left behind in the thousands. We talk about immigrant women. We talk about single mothers being left behind. What about senior women, for whom the best this government can come up with is to tell them to get a part time, minimum wage job in a big-box store? That is not the attitude we need. What is the government doing about this?

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Beauport—Limoilou
Québec

Conservative

Sylvie Boucher Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, women in Canada need help. That is why, this week, the Minister of Canadian Heritage, Status of Women and Official Languages announced the following amounts: $528,800 to Women in Cities International for a project entitled “creating safer communities for marginalized women and everyone”; $479,798 to the Native Women's Association of Canada for a project entitled “violence prevention toolkit”; $358,600 so that immigrant and visible minority women—

Status of Women
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

The Deputy Speaker Bill Blaikie

Order, please. The hon. member for Kings—Hants.

Science and Technology
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Scott Brison Kings—Hants, NS

Mr. Speaker, yesterday Dr. Arthur Carty told the industry committee that the need for a national science adviser has never been greater and that the government is “tarnishing” Canada's international reputation as a science and innovation leader by cutting that position. He also said that he is “dismayed and disappointed” that the Conservatives find scientific advice “unwanted”.

Why did the minister mislead this House by telling us that Dr. Carty is leaving voluntarily and that he supports the government's latest attack on science?

Science and Technology
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Colin Carrie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, we actually found out a lot yesterday. According to Dr. Carty, the former Liberal government concocted a science adviser, a position that was underfunded and understaffed, without a clear mandate, without a job description, with a huge expense account, without a reporting structure, without results, and without access to the cabinet and the Prime Minister.

It sounds like the Liberals are still disconnected from ordinary Canadians. This is another example of Liberal misspending and mismanagement. We feel that science and technology is so important that we replaced the Liberal position. We created a position with--

Science and Technology
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

The Deputy Speaker Bill Blaikie

The hon. member for Kings--Hants.

Science and Technology
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Scott Brison Kings—Hants, NS

Mr. Speaker, this is interesting, because before Dr. Carty spoke out, the industry minister said about Dr. Carty that he has made “significant and valuable contributions to Canada's international agenda”. He told this House that “Dr. Carty is a respected Canadian whom I hold in very high regard”.

Why, then, did the Conservatives kill Dr. Carty's position? Was it because Dr. Carty, like Linda Keen, dared to speak truth to power? Is it because this government prefers ideology to evidence?

Science and Technology
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Colin Carrie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, like I said, what we killed was that Liberal position, a Liberal position that was underfunded and understaffed, without a clear mandate, without a job description, and with a huge expense account.

This gives me the opportunity to talk about what we have replaced it with. We replaced it with STIC, the Science, Technology and Innovation Council, chaired by Dr. Howard Alper, a well-known scientist. By the way, it has a clear mandate and a clear description. It has public reporting.

I want to thank that Liberal member for allowing our budget to pass and our science and technology strategy to go through. I really do appreciate his support and so do Canadians.

Government Appointments
Oral Questions

March 7th, 2008 / 11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Todd Russell Labrador, NL

Mr. Speaker, at a time when there is so much work to be done on the environment, it is a shame and a pity that the minister has been distracted by his own ethical problems.

On the issue of a bribe of a federal appointment, was the Prime Minister's Office certain that this minister was telling the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth when he did his interviews with the OPP? Did the PMO authorize the minister to intervene in the OPP's decision to send the O'Brien file to the RCMP?

Government Appointments
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, I am going to have to go to the doctor. I almost had a heart attack. I thought the Liberals were going to ask a question on the environment, but no, they are not there. They are asking the same silly questions they have asked about imaginary scandals all the way through, but this one has a bit of an ugly side, an uglier side than usual.

That is because the member is asking a question in which he is suggesting that not just this government but the OPP is actually engaging in wrongdoing. That is the extreme point those members have gotten to. It is why nobody takes any of their allegations seriously: because there is no basis for them. The more it is demonstrated that there is no basis, the wilder the accusations get.

The fact is that the OPP cleared the minister. There was no wrongdoing.

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Tina Keeper Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, for over six months the Conservatives have used every dirty trick in their infamous disruption manual to block hearings into the Conservative in and out election financing scheme. It got so bad that MPs were forced yesterday to elect a new committee chair.

Will the new chair of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, or the vice-chair, confirm that a democratic vote allowing the committee to study the in and out scheme and hear directly from the Conservative candidates themselves will be his first order of business?

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

The Deputy Speaker Bill Blaikie

The hon. vice-chair of the committee.

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, I certainly hope that with the election of our new chair, the member for Elgin—Middlesex—London, there will be a new spirit of cooperation at our committee and we can finally get to this study.

Canadians have a right to know all about how the in and out scheme worked and they need to know this before the next election in case the Conservative Party plans to use this scheme again.

Seniors
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Raymond Gravel Repentigny, QC

Mr. Speaker, Ernest Boyer, President of the FADOQ network said: “The 2008 federal budget will definitely not help low-income seniors improve their lot”. Yet, when in opposition, the Conservatives promised to rectify the injustice perpetrated against seniors because of poor management of the guaranteed income supplement.

Given the current year's surplus of more than $10 billion, could the Conservative government not pay its debt to seniors who were adversely affected by granting full retroactivity of the guaranteed income supplement—monies to which they are entitled?

Seniors
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Blackstrap
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Lynne Yelich Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, this government recognizes that our seniors have built this country and they deserve to play a vital part through a strong voice at the cabinet table. We have increased the GIS to 7% and we have created a Secretary of State for Seniors. We have created a national advisory board to advise on seniors issues.

In the 2008 budget, we increased the exemption for GIS from $500 to $3,500. We want to thank the Liberals for assisting us with the passing of that budget.