House of Commons Hansard #77 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was port.

Topics

Official Languages
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, I can assure my Bloc colleague that our government is fully aware of the situation and that the 2010 Olympic Games will be completely bilingual. I understand his concerns, and I can assure him that we are aware of the concerns he has raised here in the House. The Olympic Games and all of the work the government is doing on this file will be bilingual in acknowledgement of this Canadian reality.

French language Television
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Luc Malo Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, Paris and its francophone partners continue to disagree about the role of the multilateral channel, TV5 Monde. Belgium, like Switzerland yesterday, has threatened to withdraw if France continues with its plan to integrate the francophone television network into the proposed France Monde holding company.

What arguments has the Canadian government expressed to France to ensure that TV5 remains a multilateral tool for the francophonie?

French language Television
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Kootenay—Columbia
B.C.

Conservative

Jim Abbott Parliamentary Secretary for Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, the heritage minister has taken note of these issues and it is under consideration.

Franco-Ontarian Association
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Anthony Rota Nipissing—Timiskaming, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Association canadienne-française de l'Ontario plays a key role in the development and enhancement of Franco-Ontarians throughout the province.

This year alone, funding has been reduced by almost 30%, resulting in the closing of one of its offices in my riding and possibly many other offices across the province.

Why has this Conservative government abandoned Franco-Ontarians?

Franco-Ontarian Association
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, it is very interesting to note that a Liberal member has asked this question because it was the Liberal government that slashed funding for Ontario's francophones. That is very interesting. Could he perhaps tell our government why major cuts were made in funding for linguistic communities?

Seniors
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Gord Brown Leeds—Grenville, ON

Mr. Speaker, a large portion of the population is aging and needs a greater level of care. We are hearing stories of the difficulties and abuse that seniors can sometimes experience with caregivers and even their own families. We know that the previous Liberal government did absolutely nothing to help vulnerable seniors experiencing the trauma of elder abuse.

Can the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development tell the House what this government is doing to help seniors who may be struggling with the issue of elder abuse?

Seniors
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Blackstrap
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Lynne Yelich Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, we recognize that seniors built this country and play a vital role in its future. They have a strong voice at the cabinet table. That is why we created a Secretary of State for Seniors and a National Seniors Council.

In budget 2008 we committed $13 million to combat elder abuse. Seniors know we care, but more importantly, they know that the opposition did nothing for 13 years. We did more in 24 months for seniors than the Liberals did in 13 years.

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Alex Atamanenko British Columbia Southern Interior, BC

Mr. Speaker, last week Kamloops lost 200 jobs when the Weyerhaeuser sawmill closed. Last summer close to 200 jobs were lost when Pope & Talbot closed in Midway. Working families are suffering in the Kootenay Boundary and in Kamloops. Families in Kaslo are also hurting due to the Meadow Creek closure. They still do not know if they qualify for the $1 billion fund.

Can the minister tell the House if the workers from Kamloops, Midway and Kaslo qualify, yes or no? If so, when will he release the funding?

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Saanich—Gulf Islands
B.C.

Conservative

Gary Lunn Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, in fact, the $1 billion community development trust money for targeting hardships went out to the province to administer these programs. We are delivering for our forest communities. We understand this is a very difficult time for them. We understand it is a difficult time for the sector right across Canada. That is why we are putting these programs in place.

I should also mention the other $400 million that we have already delivered for the forest industry, looking at innovation and new product opportunities. We are working with organizations like the Forest Products Association of Canada.

We are getting the job done. These programs will be delivered to the province in cooperation with it. We are looking forward to those results.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, more and more people in the north are concerned that review boards meant to protect the environment are becoming make work projects for Conservatives.

The most recent example of this patronage was the eleventh hour appointment of the failed Conservative candidate from the last election to the chair of the most important of these environmental protection boards, replacing the longstanding nominated incumbent.

Why is the minister ignoring the spirit and intent of these boards, which is to bring an independent northern voice to environmental assessments, by deciding that the only important qualification for the position is one's history with the Conservative Party?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, all the appointments that we make throughout Canada come from a very talented pool of qualified individuals, and that is the same in this case. Our record on the north is without parallel. Not since the Diefenbaker years has a prime minister focused so much on our northern issues.

In that member's own territory we can look to the Yellowknifer that said that our budget was one of the most progressive for the north in many years. I find it hard to imagine why that member is not supportive of the initiatives we have taken in the north.

Cluster Bombs
Oral Questions

April 11th, 2008 / 11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Mario Silva Davenport, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canada has historically been a leader in advancing peace around the world. This was clear on March 1, 1999, when the eyes of the world were on Canada as the Ottawa convention was reached banning the manufacture and use of landmines.

It is now time to make history again by banning cluster bombs. These are horrible weapons which do not differentiate between civilian and military targets. They injure and kill civilians long after they have been deployed.

When is the government going to show leadership by demanding a ban on the production and use of cluster bombs?

Cluster Bombs
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, I want to assure the hon. member that this government takes the banning of cluster bombs very seriously. We have been working with Norway and our partners to ensure that we can come to a proper resolution. We will continue doing that. I can assure the hon. member that we will be working very hard on that file because we agree with him that the issue of cluster bombs needs to be addressed.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Dick Harris Cariboo—Prince George, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals talked about the Kelowna accord, but for 13 long years they did nothing for aboriginals except come up with a bogus $5 billion press release in the dying days of their government. This press release, best described as cheap electioneering, had no budget, no specifics, no plan, no nothing.

Can the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development tell us how Liberal cheap promises, with no delivery, simply do not advance anything first nations really care about?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, clearly, the Kelowna proposals were nothing more than a press release backed up by false Liberal promises. If the Liberals were serious about these efforts, we would have seen them enact something in their 13 years. Even today, the Montreal Gazette calls the Kelowna proposals exactly the wrong approach to solving problems on reserve.

Clearly, our government has a different approach. We are actually getting things done. That is why we have cut in half the number of communities with high risk drinking water systems. We have resolved a record number of specific claims. We have tabled legislation to reduce the backlog of specific claims and we have paid out $1.2 billion so far in compensation. We are getting the job done.