House of Commons Hansard #77 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was port.

Topics

Canadian Heritage
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, what is clear now is that the minister has no say on the most important policies affecting Canadian artists and creators. She is there only to enforce the censorship agenda of the Prime Minister's Office.

If the minister hates the policy so much, why is she allowing herself to be used to implement right-wing ideologies? What is she afraid of?

Canadian Heritage
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, implementing the right-wing ideology of Sheila Copps and the Liberal Party, who came up with this idea? The reason she came up with this idea, she said, is that Canadians did not want their tax dollars funding pornography and undue violence. She is not the only person who held that view. The member for Markham—Unionville said just last month that he thought it was a very sensible proposal and that is why the Liberals supported it.

Why did the Liberals change their position one more time? Is there any issue on which they will stay in the same place for more than a few days at a time?

Securities industry
Oral Questions

April 11th, 2008 / 11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday in Toronto the Minister of Finance was back on his kick to create a single securities regulator in Canada. That idea, as hon. members know, has been rejected by Quebec and all the other provinces, except Ontario, because it is a costly and inefficient idea that interferes in provincial jurisdictions.

Will the Minister of Finance stop shooting himself in the foot—and shooting us in the foot—by undermining the current system and will he drop his centralist, inefficient plan?

Securities industry
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, again, the Bloc Québécois is desperately trying to create issues where there are none. We are not in the process of invading any jurisdictions of any provinces, including Quebec.

What the Minister of Finance has proposed is to consider whether we should, with a narrow, clear and precise focus, look together at the issues that are of concern to those people. A consultation will indeed be held and we will see what happens from there.

Securities industry
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities knows full well that everyone in the National Assembly is against this plan, including the finance minister, Ms. Jérôme-Forget, who wrote to the Minister of Finance to denounce this plan.

Yesterday was another example of the need for Quebec to have its own regulator. The Autorité des marchés financiers has approved the merger of the Montreal exchange with the Toronto Stock Exchange, but it has imposed conditions and given itself veto rights. If ever there is a single securities regulator in Canada and the Autorité des marchés financiers disappears, the vetos will also disappear and that would allow the Toronto Stock Exchange to take over all the financial activities currently handled by the Montreal exchange.

This seems like very good additional proof—

Securities industry
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

NDP

The Deputy Speaker Bill Blaikie

The hon. Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities.

Securities industry
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

On the contrary, Mr. Speaker, the hon. member has not proven anything. I repeat; this government respects provincial jurisdictions.

Again, when it comes to having a government that stands up to respect the provinces and provincial jurisdictions, people can count on us.

Securities industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Meili Faille Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, we held a debate in this House. The Minister of Finance is stepping up efforts to create a Canada-wide securities commission, which would take away Quebec's exclusive jurisdiction over this matter, and would concentrate everything in Ontario. This approach is not unlike the minister's scheme to lure turnkey projects to his riding.

Could the minister explain why, when it comes to his riding, everything is so simple, but when it comes to respecting Quebec's jurisdictions, everything becomes complicated?

Securities industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Absolutely, Mr. Speaker, this government will respect provincial jurisdiction. That is where securities regulation is at this point, but we heard loud and clear at finance committee yesterday of the problems facing those who are involved in the asset backed commercial paper. We do not have a system that protects our investors all across the country.

That is why the finance minister is looking seriously at this, but provincial jurisdiction will be respected.

Securities industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Meili Faille Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, banks fall under federal jurisdiction, but this falls under the jurisdiction of Quebec.

Does the minister's behaviour mean that he is trying to put his own political interests ahead of Quebec's, in order to get favours from his friends on Bay Street, in preparation for his future campaign for the leadership of the Ontario Liberal Party?

Securities industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I will repeat that this finance minister is absolutely respecting provincial jurisdiction, including that of Quebec, most importantly, but we do need to remember that we need to protect investors across the country.

We heard from many investors, including those from Quebec, who raised concerns that exist in regard to our system right now. That is of primary importance to us: protecting Canadians.

Government Programs
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, despite campaigning to clean up politics, the Conservatives are developing a disturbing pattern of patronage, political favouritism and mistrust. The latest example is a $45 million program for an ability centre, where it appears that only one organization in the whole of Canada fits the finance minister's criteria. It just so happens to be in the minister's own riding, with staff and family members on the board.

Will the minister commit today to extend the deadline to ensure that all interested groups can apply for access to this funding for this program? Will he commit to that today?

Government Programs
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Blackstrap
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Lynne Yelich Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, the deadline has not even passed yet. In fact, the enabling accessibility fund, if she would like to know, will invest $45 million over three years to contribute to the cost of community based projects across Canada that help people with disabilities. All proposals will have to meet guidelines. The deadline is April 30, 2008.

Government Programs
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is very curious that only one group in the minister's riding seems to qualify. No wonder Canadians are losing trust in the government. Whether it is hiding immigration changes in the budget bill or film censorship, whether it is sneaking drug advertising into a consumer protection bill or insulting the Sikh community with callous remarks, the pattern is very clear.

The Conservatives promised to do politics differently but they have not, so why should Canadians trust the government when it is appointing partisan hacks and funnelling money to groups with insider connections in Conservative ridings? They have lost the trust of the Canadian people. How are they going to get it back?

Government Programs
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, on the accessibility fund, the deadline has not even passed. Applications have not even been filed yet. How she has decided who has already received the grant is entirely beyond me.

In terms of matters like Bill C-10, we are trying to work together with other parties in a minority Parliament. This is why we were pleased on Bill C-10 that the NDP supported the bill. In fact, the member for Winnipeg North said this in the House when she was speaking about the bill:

Today we are dealing with a bill that arises out of concerns from the Auditor General about the perpetuation of tax loopholes and tax havens.

That is why those members were supporting it. They thought it was a good thing.

Apparently they are like the Liberals and they too are changing their minds every day on where they stand on the issues.