House of Commons Hansard #95 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was communities.

Topics

National Defence
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, in the previous government, the Liberals spent millions of dollars to find out that privatizing the supply chain was not only irresponsible, but extremely costly to the Canadian taxpayer.

My question for the Prime Minister is quite clear. Are there any discussions with Haliburton or any other companies regarding the privatization of the supply chain of Canada's military?

National Defence
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the government takes the supply of our troops extremely seriously. There have been some issues raised recently by the Auditor General, who alluded to about a penny on the dollar of the money that is spent to equip our troops.

After a decade of darkness under the Liberals and a long period of utter contempt by that member and his party for any kind of defence spending, I find it a bit ironic to get a question on an item like this by him.

The Auditor General, in fact, praised the department for taking action on the items she raised with respect to the supply system, even as her report was underway. As usual, we are getting the job done.

National Defence
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, the supply chain of the military supplies everything from pencils to planes. There are 3,000 businesses from Victoria to Gander that currently have access to DND. The privatization of that supply chain will kick them out of the business. As well, 1,600 full time public service jobs will be gone if it is privatized.

My question for the government is very simple. I know it cannot handle easy questions, so I will say it very slowly. Is it or is it not privatizing the supply chain of Canada's military?

National Defence
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, let me say this very slowly for that member and his party. This government supports the Canadian Forces. We will supply the Canadian Forces with the equipment they need. It will be done in the interests of the Canadian Forces. It will be done in the interests of Canadian industry.

The Prime Minister and the Minister of National Defence recently announced the Canada first defence strategy. That will give the defence department and the Canadian Forces the tools they need for the next 20 years and beyond to do the jobs that the member and his party would rather they not do in the first place.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, during question period, the hon. Minister of Fisheries and Oceans fabricated the notion that the previous government was going to close the Coast Guard college in Sydney.

This is a blatant falsehood, and I would like to invite him to correct the record and apologize.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl
Newfoundland & Labrador

Conservative

Loyola Hearn Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, let me remind the member that there is no graduation at the college this year simply because there was no registration three years ago. The college had been downgraded so much, plans were made to shut it down, and he well knows it.

Oral Questions
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

It sounds like a dispute as to facts to me rather than a point of order. I will consider the matter, one that is available for debate on another occasion.

Canadian Parliamentary Delegations
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I have the honour to lay upon the table the report of a Canadian parliamentary delegation concerning its official visit to Peru from March 14 to 20, 2008.

Government Response to Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Blackstrap
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Lynne Yelich Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8) I have the honour to table, in both official language, the government's response to seven petitions.

Interparliamentary Delegations
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

South Surrey—White Rock—Cloverdale
B.C.

Conservative

Russ Hiebert Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs and Minister of Western Economic Diversification

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34 I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, a report from the Canadian branch of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association on its recent bilateral parliamentary visit to Nuku'alofa, Tonga, from January 15 to 22.

Fisheries and Oceans
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Fabian Manning Avalon, NL

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans on the main estimates for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2009.

Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the seventh report of the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics.

The report recommends to the House an amendment to the conflict of interest code for members of the House of Commons. More specifically, with regard to the code for members of Parliament, it would have the effect that if a member were named a defendant in a lawsuit regarding matters before Parliament or a committee of Parliament, that this would not constitute furthering the private interests of the member or the interests of another person.

This is a very serious matter and we certainly look forward to having it dealt with by the House.

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Brent St. Denis Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-543, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (abuse of pregnant woman).

Mr. Speaker, the reason I am tabling the bill is many of us felt that Bill C-484, while it did attempt to accomplish certain things in protecting pregnant women from assault or abuse, left too many unanswered questions and too many doors were left open.

For those of us who are pro-choice, but did not want to go down that road, I have created a simple bill, which would provide judges with the ability to increase the penalties for those who would knowingly assault or abuse a pregnant woman.

I have had this tested to see whether it would open the door to recriminalization of abortion, and it will not. I have had it tested to see whether it would have any censure against the women herself, should she choose to have an abortion, and that will not be the case. In fact, it plugs all the holes left by Bill C-484.

I invite members, who felt as awkward as I did in not supporting Bill C-484, to look at this as a very helpful option to assist pregnant women, should they be attacked by those who are knowingly aware they are pregnant.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Excise Tax Act
Routine Proceedings

May 14th, 2008 / 3:10 p.m.

Bloc

Caroline St-Hilaire Longueuil—Pierre-Boucher, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-544, An Act to amend the Excise Tax Act (children's diapers and products for newborns).

Mr. Speaker, today I am pleased to be tabling in this House a bill to amend the Excise Tax Act in order to exempt children's diapers from the goods and services tax and so follow the lead of the Quebec government, which has not charged sales tax on these products for several years now.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Textile Labelling Act
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-545, An Act to amend the Textile Labelling Act.

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are increasingly demanding that our investments and consumption, both at home and abroad, be a constant testament to our principles and values of transparency and accountability. It is time that our government responds to this call.

My bill would require labels on clothing to include a reference number that consumers could use to identify the name and address of a factory where an item of clothing was produced. This measure has been highly recommended by a number of advocacy groups, including the Ethical Trading Action Group and Amnesty International.

If this bill is passed, Canadians will have access to even more information when making their purchases. For those of us who believe that under no circumstances should we benefit from the exploitation of workers in poor countries, knowing exactly where a piece of clothing was produced will allow us to vote with our feet: to refuse to buy clothing made in factories where conditions are unacceptable.

According to Amnesty International and the Ethical Trading Action Group, if the public knows exactly where products are being manufactured, businesses will have to self-regulate for fear that civil society will use this new tool to publicize the names of the companies responsible for unfair employment practices.

I hope this House will indeed support my private member's bill.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)