House of Commons Hansard #97 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was rights.

Topics

Minister of Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, in the past, we would read the daily Le Jour to find out about the sovereignist ideology. Under this leader of the Bloc Québécois, we can now read Allô Police and other supermarket tabloids.

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

May 16th, 2008 / 11:25 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canada has a forestry industry in crisis and a Conservative government that does not respond. The mill closure in Mackenzie, B.C. is just the latest example.

The government is allowing countless companies and communities to flounder and fail without planning for future market cycles. Without targeted help, forestry jobs will disappear, never to return.

Why is the Conservative government handing billions of dollars to oil companies while letting these forest families struggle with an impact that is devastating in local communities?

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Saanich—Gulf Islands
B.C.

Conservative

Gary Lunn Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the member is absolutely wrong. It is our government that has ended the tax subsidy for the oil sands projects in future. We are phasing that out.

In fact, we are providing billions of dollars to help those affected workers. Our Prime Minister announced a billion dollars in the community development trust, which was handed over to the provinces to deliver help to these communities directly. We are working with the industry on innovation, new market opportunities and opportunities for technology. The industry is very pleased with our efforts.

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, I challenge the minister to go to Mackenzie, B.C. and just see what the impact is on families and that community as a result of all of the jobs that are being lost there.

It is the same with the pine beetle. Climate change has allowed the mountain pine beetle to ravage the forests of B.C. The result of the red tide of destruction across B.C.'s interior is being felt in many communities and homes. This season will yet again see major fire risk because of the deadwood and climate conditions.

I would like to know what steps the Conservative government is taking to address the safety and security of communities at risk. Or will it be just another story of too little, too late?

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Saanich—Gulf Islands
B.C.

Conservative

Gary Lunn Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, I cannot believe the nerve of the NDP members who stand up and raise the pine beetle issue in the House.

When the infestation broke out, it was an NDP government in British Columbia that refused to act. It refused to control this. In fact, there are members of the NDP caucus who were sitting at the cabinet table. Everyone knows that this broke out in the mid-1990s when there was an NDP government that refused to deal with it because it was in a provincial park.

Our government has taken responsible action. We committed a billion dollars over 10 years. We are delivering. We are making a difference. The NDP members should be ashamed of themselves for not acting when they had a chance.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, on Monday the Prime Minister's spinners were saying that their new defence strategy, all 755 words of it, would cost $30 billion, but yesterday the Prime Minister also said there would be another $50 billion for new equipment.

Whether it is $50 billion or $30 billion or $30 billion plus $50 billion, there is still one glaring fact: none of those numbers are mentioned in the Conservative budget that was published just two and a half months ago. Where is the provision in the budget for $30 billion in new defence operations plus $50 billion in new equipment?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, as the Prime Minister said yesterday very clearly, this is a long term plan, and the long term plan calls for 20 years and to spend $30 billion by 2028, which is the operating budget. It will be annually by that time.

The other $45 billion to $50 billion is for capital expenditures. That is the plan, as the Prime Minister said, and that is the long term plan for the armed forces over that period of time.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, the parliamentary secretary just totally contradicted himself from yesterday. One shows respect for Canada's armed forces first and foremost by telling the truth. According to the government's own projections, there is absolutely no fiscal room to pay for this new defence plan.

Even calling it a plan is a stretch. According to the defence department, this $30 billion or $50 billion or $80 billion or $90 billion plan exists only in two speeches. At 755 words, the Prime Minister's speech was totally vacuous and, strangely, the defence minister's speech, the one that was supposed to have the details, has disappeared. How does the government explain such a farce?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Prime Minister and I made it very clear what these expenditures are and what was said about this plan.

What Canadians would like to know is what the Liberals' plan is on the carbon tax that they are going to be charging Canadians. Their leader has been saying that they are going to be charging Canadians a carbon tax. We want to know what is in their plan.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government presented a defence plan that no one is allowed to read. It announced costs that no one can agree upon. It has cut the department off from any kind of communication.

When will the minister give this House specifics on his so-called Canada first defence strategy? When will he tell us how much it will cost Canadians?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, the 20 year plan that the government has announced includes replacing six core fleets, including the destroyers, land combat vehicles and fixed-wing research and rescue aircraft. For the forces, it includes ensuring the continuity of defence infrastructure and ensuring that the Canadian Forces are ready to deploy where and when they are needed. The time for the decade of darkness is over. We ordered that, and that is in the plan.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is obvious that the Minister of National Defence and the parliamentary secretary are not able to answer the simplest of questions. How can we trust them with something as serious as a 20-year plan for our army?

The minister said that his plan would cost $30 billion, DND is talking about $50 billion, and industry stakeholders estimate nearly $100 billion.

My question is simple. Who is telling the truth?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, there is an operating budget and there is a capital budget. We have indicated what will be the operating budget and what will the capital budget. It is as simple as that. Now if the members do not understand the plan, that is fine.

However, Canadians would like to know about the carbon tax that the Liberals will charge them. That is an issue in which Canadians are interested.

As far as we are concerned, the Canada first strategy is where the armed forces are going in the future.

Air Transportation
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Mario Laframboise Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, in response to a question about the Mont-Tremblant International Airport, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety told us that he could not reveal anything about the nature of the discussions taking place. But the airport president, Serge Larivière, is saying that he would like to meet with the ministers concerned as quickly as possible. That is proof enough that there are no discussions taking place and that the parliamentary secretary is making things up.

Instead of saying whatever comes to mind, will the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities finally take his files seriously?

Air Transportation
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, I hope the member will listen closely. I said that the CBSA provided service at Rivière-Rouge/Mont-Tremblant Airport based on an agreement with the airport. The CBSA is willing to work closely with the airport on this important issue and hopes to find a resolution upon which they both can agree.