House of Commons Hansard #97 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was treaty.

Topics

Labour Market Training
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Blackstrap
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Lynne Yelich Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada has programs for all Canadians from coast to coast to coast, throughout ten provinces and three territories. We believe in education and training. We have put more money into child care than any other government, $5.6 billion in early learning and child care. We have invested in training and skills. That investment is more than any other government has done in history.

Interparliamentary Affairs
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

France Bonsant Compton—Stanstead, QC

Mr. Speaker, the executive of the Canadian section of the Inter-Parliamentary Union has adopted a Bloc Québécois motion calling for the offer to hold the Inter-Parliamentary Union general assembly in Quebec City in 2010 to be maintained. In addition, the secretary general of the Inter-Parliamentary Union has offered to come to Canada “in the hope that Canada will soon welcome an IPU assembly”.

Will the Minister of Foreign Affairs show some openness so that Quebec City can host this major conference in 2010?

Interparliamentary Affairs
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we fully support holding this event here in Canada, in Quebec City. My colleague, the minister, has said as much on numerous occasions. Obviously, we have to work with the decision-makers to move things forward.

However, some people on the opposition side, especially on the Liberal benches, like to stir up trouble, particularly certain senators from the Quebec City area who say that this will never happen.

Post-Secondary Education
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Michael Savage Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Mr. Speaker, last week I asked about the decision of the U.K. government to cancel the Commonwealth scholarships for Canadian students.

We know that the government spends a lot of time trying to shape and distort the news, but there must be somebody over there who reads it now and then, yet the parliamentary secretary to the minister responsible for higher education told the House last week she had never even heard of the scholarships. Last night the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation admitted his government was not even consulted and now it is scrambling madly to make up for this snub.

The government needs to stand up strongly for Canadian students. When is it going to start?

Post-Secondary Education
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, I told the hon. member yesterday in my answer during the late show that Canada was concerned about this decision and that we would be asking the government of the U.K. to revisit the decision.

Canada has approached the government of the U.K. to talk about revisiting the issue, as I said yesterday.

International Aid
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Leon Benoit Vegreville—Wainwright, AB

Mr. Speaker, buildings have been destroyed, cars flipped over, thousands of people killed and children buried in rubble. Canadians have watched this unfold on television on a daily basis and are left with a feeling of despair.

The Chinese authorities, to their credit, have mounted a major rescue effort with over 100,000 troops in one of the fastest reactions to a natural disaster that the world has ever seen.

However, Canadians want to know what their government is doing to help. Can the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation tell us what this government is doing for the people in China?

International Aid
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, we are all saddened by the chaos in the aftermath of the earthquake in China and this government stands ready to answer the call.

I am pleased to tell the House today that Canada has responded to the Red Cross appeal for international assistance and we will be sending them $1 million.

I want to emphasize what the minister said yesterday, that our government has committed to match dollar for dollar the donations made by individual Canadians.

I want to let the people of China know that we will do everything in our power to help them in their time of need.

Sport
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, there is no place in amateur sports for violence, bullying, exploitation or abuse. A safe and healthy sports experience starts with competent trained coaches to create an atmosphere of fair play and respect.

In light of recent incidences of violence in amateur sport that horrified many Canadians, why is our Secretary of State for Sport not using her office to ensure that Canada's 300,000 coaches are promoting fair play and fun and preventing this culture of bullying and violence that so disturbs many Canadians?

Sport
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, I noted the press conference my colleague had this morning on this issue. I think all members of the House from all parties agree with the sentiment of what he has just said. We just happen to disagree with the solution that he has proposed.

I think local amateur sporting organizations can take care of some of these things. I think local solutions to some of these local problems are how these problems are best handled. We saw that in fact with the Quebec junior hockey league when there was that violent incident that we all remember seeing on television.

We agree with the sentiment of what the member has proposed, but I think solutions are best found locally.

Sport
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, successive federal governments copping out has led to the expansion and escalation of the problem.

In my home province of Manitoba we have trained all 10,000 of our amateur coaches using a program designed by former NHLer, Sheldon Kennedy. The program is accessible, affordable and effective.

Why would our Secretary of State for Sport not promote and implement a national program to elevate the standard of coaching right across the country? Instead of opting for doing nothing at all and abdicating her responsibility, she has a golden opportunity to use her office for something positive, yet she does absolutely nothing that we can determine.

Sport
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Again, Mr. Speaker, I agree with the sentiment of what my colleague is saying, but I do not think it is fair in any Parliament to say, “Either it is my solution or there is no other solution”. There are other solutions. We believe in supporting, as I said, local sports organizations. Also, we support young kids getting involved in amateur sports. That is why we have the $500 per child amateur sport tax credit, so that kids can get more involved in amateur sport.

We believe in reaching out and supporting local organizations, the volunteer organizations at the grassroots in communities across the country that are helping young kids get involved in amateur sport, to participate in ways that are sportsmanlike and build camaraderie, to become young athletes with the kind of character that we know makes Canada very strong.

Tasers
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Don Bell North Vancouver, BC

Mr. Speaker, the government has been shamefully absent from the B.C. taser inquiry. Earlier this week, the only federal politician to go before the inquiry was the Liberal public safety critic who rightfully put the onus on Taser International to prove that tasers are safe. Even the chairman of the company admitted to the inquiry that tasers are not risk free.

It has been months since the RCMP Public Complaints Commissioner recommended that tasers be reclassified as impact weapons. When will the minister take action on this file?

Tasers
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. member knows, there are a number of investigations going on, including inquiries in British Columbia.

We have received the report from the Public Complaints Commissioner. As more information becomes available, we will deal with the issue.

Government Procurement
Oral Questions

May 16th, 2008 / 11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Harold Albrecht Kitchener—Conestoga, ON

Mr. Speaker, our government demonstrated our commitment to accountability by introducing the Federal Accountability Act as the first piece of legislation tabled in the House.

This legislation includes provisions, like the creation of the Office of the Procurement Ombudsman, to bring more accountability and transparency to the procurement process.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services give the House an update on the status of the Procurement Ombudsman and how this office will give small and medium business continued confidence in the federal procurement process?

Government Procurement
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, yes, it is true that yesterday the Minister of Public Works and the President of the Treasury Board announced the official appointment of Mr. Shahid Minto as the government's first Procurement Ombudsman and that the office is now up and running.

The announcement is a final step in the implementation of the Federal Accountability Act which our government brought forward after the last election campaign to strengthen accountability, fairness and transparency in all areas of parliamentary and public service and to improve opportunities for small and medium size businesses and enterprises when it comes to government procurement.

The Procurement Ombudsman will examine departmental practices in acquiring materials and services as well as make any appropriate recommendations to the relevant department for the improvement of these practices.

This is what we promised to do and we have gotten it done.